Search the Community

Showing results for tags '44 ton'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Frontpage, Forum Information and General LEGO Discussion
    • Guest Section - PLEASE READ BEFORE YOU REGISTER!
    • Frontpage News
    • Forum Information and Help
    • General LEGO Discussion
    • The Embassy
  • Themes
    • LEGO Licensed
    • LEGO Star Wars
    • LEGO Historic Themes
    • LEGO Action and Adventure Themes
    • LEGO Pirates
    • LEGO Sci-Fi
    • LEGO Town
    • LEGO Train Tech
    • LEGO Technic, Mindstorms & Model Team
    • LEGO Scale Modeling
    • LEGO Action Figures
    • Special LEGO Themes
  • Special Interests
    • Minifig Customisation Workshop
    • LEGO Digital Designer and other digital tools
    • Brick Flicks & Comics
    • LEGO Mafia and Role-Play Games
    • LEGO Media and Gaming
  • Eurobricks Community
    • Hello! My name is...
    • LEGO Events and User Groups
    • Buy, Sell, Trade and Finds
    • Community
    • Culture & Multimedia

Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Country


Special Tags 1


Special Tags 2


Special Tags 3


Special Tags 4


Special Tags 5


Special Tags 6


Country flag

Found 2 results

  1. Originally built in Sand Red by my father in the early 2000's, this industrial building is one of my dad's biggest creations. I modified it and brought it up to my specifications... okay, I whinged it from looking at the model. I took some liberties, (& made some mistakes) with the original model. I have redone the MOC in easier-to-buy white, with black window frames. This factory produces automobiles, and they are loaded onto three-level auto racks for transport around the country or around the globe. They are shuffled around the loading dock by a General Electric 44 ton diesel switcher in matching color scheme to the factory. The whole ensemble is owned by the OGEL automotive group, a division of Brickster Incorporated. The tracks side. The factory was originally built in sand red but since this color is extremely expensive and hard to find, I used white with modern black window frames instead. This end of the factory has a ladder to the top of the smokestack. Their is also a small water tower on top of the roof as well. Inside view, with the detachable roof removed. Dad never finished this part, and probably never will. The loading doors do open, and were modified from the original arched doors as they couldn't fit a forklift... then again, these doors might not either! This diesel engine is modeled after the GE 44 ton switcher locomotive. Why 44 tons, you may ask? I give you the answer from the Wikipedia article on this loco type: This locomotive's specific 44-short ton weight was directly related to one of the efficiencies the new diesel locomotives offered compared to their steam counterparts: reduced labor intensity. In the 1940s, the steam to diesel transition was in its infancy in North America, and railroad unions were trying to protect the locomotive fireman jobs that were redundant with diesel units. One measure taken to this end was the 1937 so-called "90,000 Pound Rule" : a stipulation that locomotives weighing 90,000 pounds (41,000 kg) – 45 short tons – or more required a fireman in addition to an engineer on common carrier railroads. Industrial and military railroads had no such stipulation. The 44-ton locomotive was born to skirt this requirement. The loco is dual directional, and doesn't have much to differentiate between the "front" or "rear" expect for the air horn and exhaust stack on one end in real life. My LEGO model lacks these, so it's only way to tell which is front is by the headlights: clear for front, red for rear. Also, the four studs are supposed to say "OGEL" (that's the owner of the auto plant and the 44-ton loco) while 101 should go on the three studs for the loco's I.D. number. This three level auto rack was originally found on LGauge .com as seen here. I redesigned that model and added tiny automobiles to fit into the racks. There is but a single plate worth of clearance between the automobiles and the rack above. The automobiles are attached using 2 x 3 plates, put they are removable... if you take the roof of the freight car off first! These tiny cars can seat a single figure each, and have two opening doors per car. The vehicles come in three color varieties, (red, white ,yellow) though a fourth (blue) is possible but is sightly more expensive. NOTES: I hoped this factory would be of some use for some people, as the original always has been gathering dust in the basement since it was built, as seen below: This is the original factory that was by my Dad around the years 2000 - 2004. it was built with parts from several Sand Red supplemental packs available at that time. It does not feature any interior, nor does it have a removable roof. But this thing is built STRONG: you have to really put your weight on it to press the roof together. It has never been determined what this factory made in-universe, though for my own purposes in my younger years, I pretended it made beverages. What beverages, you ask? Why, Dr. Leg O. Brick's Root Beer of course! LDD file for my version of the factory, two auto racks, GE 44 ton diesel loco, and 16 cars in three colors (red, yellow, and white) can be downloaded here. Comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome!
  2. This engine is modeled after the GE 44 ton switcher locomotive. Why 44 tons, you may ask? I give you the answer from the Wikipedia article on this loco type: This locomotive's specific 44-short ton weight was directly related to one of the efficiencies the new diesel locomotives offered compared to their steam counterparts: reduced labor intensity. In the 1940s, the steam to diesel transition was in its infancy in North America, and railroad unions were trying to protect the locomotive fireman jobs that were redundant with diesel units. One measure taken to this end was the 1937 so-called "90,000 Pound Rule" :[citation needed] a stipulation that locomotives weighing 90,000 pounds (41,000 kg) – 45 short tons – or more required a fireman in addition to an engineer on common carrier railroads. Industrial and military railroads had no such stipulation. The 44-ton locomotive was born to skirt this requirement. The loco is bi-directional, and doesn't have much to differentiate between the "front" or "rear" expect for the air horn and exhaust stack on one end in real life. My LEGO model lacks these, so it's only way to tell which is front is by the headlights: clear for front, red for rear. I am going to name this loco WFP number 7007. (WFP stands for Wabash Frisco & Pacific, which is the name of a 12 inch gauge ride-on railway in St. Louis, MO.) They don't have a real 44 toner there, but do have a Fairbanks Morse H10-44 (number 704) in the same color scheme, so I made this engine as a companion to the H10-44. In the spoiler tag below, you will find a real life picture of a 44-toner loco. (I got the picture from railpictures.net, It is NOT mine!) Just for comparison purposes, here is the H10-44 I was talking about. NOTE: The H10-44 is NOT included in the GE 44-ton's LDD file! The (updated) LDD file for the GE loco is available here. Build updated 3-14-17 with a better 44 ton GE unit, courtesy of Henry Durand over on Facebook's LEGO Train Fan Club. Thanks Henry! Comments, Questions, suggestions and complaints are always welcome!