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Found 2 results

  1. Just over a month ago I revealed my latest creation to the world, a scale model of the light rail vehicles that are located in my home city of Gold Coast (Queensland, Australia). Lego G: by Aaron Coghill, on Flickr Just over 3 years old the light rail system here is currently being extended to comprise a total of 19 stations over a 21km single line, using 18 Bombardier Flexity 2 LRVs (light rail vehicles). My Lego version of the G: (gee, the local name for the trams) is a roughly 1:40 scale, 8 wide, 136 studs long (8.5x normal straight track lengths), 7 carriages in yellow, dark gray & blue. I worked on the design for months getting the proportions right. In a twist of fate that i was on the right track a technical drawing i found when printed at the build scale, a 9V motor unit has the same wheel base as the printed drawing. Like the Flexity 2, the overall unit is made up of three different carriage types. A wheeled drivers unit, a suspended passenger unit (with doors) and another wheeled passenger unit that sits between the suspended units. So a LRV is made up of an odd number of carriages with the odd numbered units having wheeled contact & even carriages suspended between. It is powered by two 9V train motors that are positioned in the first & last carriages. And due to its design performs nicely on standard track geometry including a full 4x (90deg) curve. The carriages are joined together using old school ball hinge parts (two) placed at the top and bottom of each carriage. This keeps them straight and in line with each other., and allows for a bit of vertical movement due to tables never being level at shows. The side panels are built with a snot technique of tiles on plates. A friend owns Print on Bricks and did the small tiles while the large G: were done at a sign writers. I also created a light rail station in the same style at is located in my city. Lego G: by Aaron Coghill, on Flickr Lego G: by Aaron Coghill, on Flickr Lego G: by Aaron Coghill, on Flickr The local paper did a small article on my creation and I will be displaying the model with GoldLinq (the operators) and Bombardier (manufactures) at two seperate shows these coming months. Lego G: by Aaron Coghill, on Flickr Lego G: by Aaron Coghill, on Flickr More photos here: I have to thank Ashi Valkoinen and his CAF Urbos 3 tram, Budapest [REAL MOC] post that gave me inspiration.
  2. This model was inspired by the Siemens SD-460 type light rail vehicles used by Metro Link in Saint Louis, Missouri. They are usually two sets used on every train, so just imagine a exact duplicate of the train above connected to the train you see. Basically it's four cars with only two walkways and four cabs, though only the outer two are ever used on the line. Also, the two cars with the inter-car connection are supposed to share a Jacobs bogie underneath the walkway. I didn't use one because it would cause problems storing the train in my boxes IF I decide to get it. the walkway. I didn't use one because it would cause problems storing the train in my boxes IF I decide to get it. The side of the model. The first set of pantographs on the far ends of the cars are used as ice cutters in cold weather (though they can be used in an emergency for power collection) , while the second, inner pair are actually used as the electric pickup points. This is not my map, I got it off Google. It is used by Metro Link on it's trains to show the stations used by the Light-Rail system. The Metro Bus routes are not shown, as their are too many routes to show on this type of map, though the metro buses usually use the routes of the old streetcars. The train is supposed to feature the "M" logo on it's front and rear ends, but their is no printing on the logo, which is a blue square with a red circle inside, which has a capital "M" in white located inside the red circle. (I used a black 1x1 plate because it stood out more.) Anyone wanting to read more about Metro Link and their plans for any future extensions and such should visit their wiki page here: https://en.wikipedia...ink_(St._Louis) EDIT: forgot to add the LDD file: http://www.moc-pages.com/user_images/80135/1453843587m.lxf