Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'WIP'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Frontpage, Forum Information and General LEGO Discussion
    • Guest Section - PLEASE READ BEFORE YOU REGISTER!
    • Frontpage News
    • Forum Information and Help
    • General LEGO Discussion
    • The Embassy
  • Themes
    • LEGO Licensed
    • LEGO Star Wars
    • LEGO Historic Themes
    • LEGO Action and Adventure Themes
    • LEGO Pirates
    • LEGO Sci-Fi
    • LEGO Town
    • LEGO Train Tech
    • LEGO Technic and Model Team
    • LEGO Mindstorms and Robotics
    • LEGO Scale Modeling
    • LEGO Action Figures
    • Special LEGO Themes
  • Special Interests
    • Minifig Customisation Workshop
    • LEGO Digital Designer and other digital tools
    • Brick Flicks & Comics
    • LEGO Mafia and Role-Play Games
    • LEGO Media and Gaming
  • Eurobricks Community
    • Hello! My name is...
    • LEGO Events and User Groups
    • Buy, Sell, Trade and Finds
    • Community
    • Culture & Multimedia

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


What is favorite LEGO theme? (we need this info to prevent spam)


Which LEGO set did you recently purchase or build?


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Country


Special Tags 1


Special Tags 2


Special Tags 3


Special Tags 4


Special Tags 5


Special Tags 6


Country flag

Found 235 results

  1. Greetings, shipwrights. Whether a novice, an apprentice, a master, or a veteran shipwright, following the process of others, sharing your own, and giving and receiving feedback can help everyone improve. What's the point? This is just a place for all of us liberally to post WIP's for feedbacks, tips, suggestions, and questions, without otherwise littering the BoBS forum with WIP's. You can post just one step in the process, or several over a period. It's all up to you. So I am working on a vessel/ship - what do I do? Post one or more pictures, questions, ship-plans, descriptions, etc. here, and hopefully someone will step in with some wonderful advice. At least, I expect to do so. I know NOTHING about ships - can I comment, and how do I do? Everyone with something constructive to say can comment. No need to be a scholar in historic vessels, medieval carpentry or sail making. Sometimes it might just be aesthetics, a crazy idea, a suggestion for a technique, use of a specific brick, or whatever you can think of. Just keep it nice and constructive. In return, builders posting here will pwomise not to take offense! I'd suggest tagging the builder you are commenting on. But I am not an expert - the arrogant elite will laugh at my puny attempts at shipbuilding! First of all, the arrogant elite was not invited. In fact, they have been given specific instructions to go back to their fancy little elitist coffee houses to talk about how brilliant they are. Secondly, regarding puny attempts, take a look at my first attempt at a ship just two and a half years ago... Well, you really don't have to look. Move along... Nothing to see here... The rather obvious point being, we all start somewhere, and no matter where you start, or how steep your learning curve is. The only requirement is that you want to share your process, learn from others, share your ideas, and/or improve. Soooo, is this something official? What will I gain from participating? EGS bonuses? HAH! This is merely me gone rogue - and I may hang from my toes for it! No official bonuses here. However, I'd like to see a bit more focus on the process and techniques of building here, and I think ships is an interesting place to start. This is, however, quite likely to be replaced, superseded, or added to by something official at some point in the future. Who manages this and keeps the record? Manages? Keeps records? Bwahahaha - forget it! Just post your WIP's and comments. Don't overthink it! ________________________________________________________________________ Kick off! Oooohkay, here we go: I have been working on a 4th rate, circa 50 guns on two decks. I present to you: The HMS Endeavour. Started here: Went here: And have ended here: She is supposed to be the first in a series of 4th rates designed for colonial waters. A 4th rate is a small ship of the line between 46 and 60 guns, just above frigate size. This one is (IC) specifically designed to serve as flagship for colonial squadrons, sailing in consort with frigates and sloops. Looking forward to hearing your comments! And to see your WIP's!
  2. snowvictim

    [MOC] St. Alexander's Church

    Greetings! I have recently took upon myself the task of recreating one of my favourite buildings lost to the ravages of war: St. Alexander's Church in Warsaw, Poland. It's quite an ambitious project (over 20,000 bricks) that I intend to finish by October. Background information: The church was completed in 1825 and was built in the neoclassical style. In the 1890s, the Russians, who occupied Poland, decided to remodel the building architecturally and expand it considerably. The temple was practically intact following the German invasion of Poland in 1939, and was almost completely razed to the ground as part of the planned destruction of Warsaw in late 1944 (only one of the bell towers survived). After the war, the church was rebuilt, however in its original form, not the one after the 1890 alteration (probably due to a combination of insufficient funding and the opposition to the Church by the new communist regime). My aim was to rebuild the church as it stood between 1890 and 1944. Notes on the build: Dimensions: the building itself measures 132cm x 76cm x 54cm (the build is situated on a 2x4 grid of 48x48 baseplates) Many people may be annoyed by this, but I decided not to build the interior for two reasons; one is practical, the other is technical. As for practicality, I came up with an idea to insert some LED lighting into the church so that it can be illuminated, which should combine beautifully with the trans-coloured bricks that make up the stained glass windows. Inserting a power source, wiring, lights, controlled, etc. may have been problematic with a completed interior. Regarding technicality, I conducted a lot of photographic research before designing the model in Studio. While pictures of the exterior are not difficult to come by (owing to the fact that the church was one of the architectural crown jewels of pre-war Warsaw), I had only found one of the interior, and the quality of it was insufficient to provide an appropriate representation of the interior. Although written accounts of the interior do exist, I wanted to stay true to the original. Granted, one cannot replicate everything in Lego (especially me, a mediocre builder at best), but I didn't want my imagination to taint the build. Photos of the actual church: (The church after being destroyed. Notice the one surviving bell tower. The bricks you can see in the foreground came from the church and were used to build other buildings for the returning population following their expulsion after the failure of the Warsaw Uprising). Renders: Note: the renders aren't complete, primarily because of technical limitations. I'm running an Intel i7 with a GTX 1080 and even that setup struggles sometimes. Also, the angles of the build make working in Studio annoying at times. Some elements that I wanted to put Studio considers as colliding with others (particularly when it comes to the dome), so I've decided to just do them in real life instead. These include the top of the dome, the roofing adjacent to the dome base, the statues on the roof, and some minor details here and there. The greatest challenge will be the walls of the dome; as you can see they're empty, and I may have to resort to non-Lego means. Building: More to follow! Most of the workpace is dictated by how fast the BrickLink orders arrive at my place.
  3. So I have (slowly) begun working on a castle, the Castle of Syndrifel. I started on the great hall and kitchen, because let's be honest, even minifigures get hungry. After building the great hall, I began to realize just how big this thing will be. I'm planning on building it in modular secutions due to the real estate it will take up. Do the colors look ok? Too much dark grey? Etc. The first two photos are the great hall and kitchen, sans furniture for the most part. A minifigure is there for scale. The white arch there is also just a place holder, as are the transparent bricks behind the royal table. Some furniture I've been working on. The far left might be counters, but I'm really not fans. The middle tan and black will probably be shelves and tables in the kitchen. Far right are 99% sure to be benches. Should I start building from the ground up? Right now I have ane idea of the walls. Ignore the white bricks, they're place holders, as are the full on dark gray. I'm thinking 12x12 for the towers, aside from the main gaates which might be 12x14 or something to give a bit more room. The center 4x4 will be filled in as well. I have six of those built, which are the amount of towers I plan on building.
  4. Finished MOC Do you remember my Reform Metrac H7X ? Reform also produces the Muli: As the project of my Citröen DS doesn’t really progresses, I do this project in WIP, to compensate. ^^ The functions will be close to the Metrac ones: 4WD with a 4 cylinders fake engine Steering with 3 modes Front and rear PTOs And I add: A pneumatic pump to add pneumatic tools Central joint (it’s only the front axle on the Metrac) Openable cab with a lever and a pump actionning a pneumatic cylinder. The best function! But this MOC will not be manual, because there is not so much room in the chassis. (I think it’s possible, but the playability will be extremely bad) So it will be remote controlled, using the BuWizz. So: Driving by 1 XL by axle Steering: 1 servo by axle. To have the 3 steering modes: a M motors controls a PFs switch -> it changes the sens of rotation of the rear servo, or it stops it. The pneumatic pump is powered by a M motor That was the start: And now I’m here: On these two pictures, you can see the rear PTO. On this side, the pneumatic pump: And here is the mecanism which allows the possibility to get 3 steering modes: The chassis is very, very compact. I think you can put an elephant on it, it will not move at all. For the tools, I think I’ll make a pneumatic arm (The pneumatic cylinders of the Mercedes truck would be very helpful, but I don’t have this set) And for the front I don’t know, so if you have ideas, tell me!
  5. General MOC-Discussion Ahoy! Ever felt like there's not enough general talk going on here about what matters most in these waters - MOCs? Ever got frustrated over a certain issue with a WIP that you could need help with? Ever thought about posting a WIP but didn't think it would deserve its own thread? Ever wanted to announce a huge, mind boggling, or simply your next project and ask your fellow EB members what they think about that idea? Or have you ever just felt the urge to tease everyone with a blurred picture of your creation or some facts about it before releasing it for good? Well, hesitate no further, this is the place for you! Use this thread as a vessel for all the otherwise unmentioned MOC related talk, use it to discuss sail sizes and capstan designs, ask for ideas, help others with their MOC issues and tease your fellow mateys... with pics of your creations, of course
  6. Hello! Welcome to my WIP "Midi" Scale Lego Modular City. Unlike Micro scale or Minifig scale, Midi scale sits inbetween those two. Above is a 16x16 corner modular base with a three wide sidewalk. The 1x4 Technic bricks are the connector bricks that allow you to connect the modulars together. Also, 1x1 bricks with a 1x1 round plates on top represent the people in this scale. Check out my "Midiopolis" Flickr album to see everything I've made so far in Midi Scale. https://www.flickr.com/photos/149607664@N06/albums/72157691144814160 Also, feel to check out and join my Lego Midi Scale Flickr group! https://www.flickr.com/groups/lego_midi_scale/
  7. Hey guys, here's a MOC I've been planning to make for quite a while now: the 1972 Winnebago Brave. RV's have gained virtually no attention in the world of Lego Technic, so I'm pretty excited to see what I could accomplish in this MOC. I also plan on bringing this MOC to BrickFair Virginia this summer. I decided to do a Winnebago for this project because my friend back in Iowa has a passion for Winnebago RVs. Out of the many Winnebago RVs out there (Cheftain, Indian, etc) and model years, I settled on the Brave because her favorite model is the 1972 Brave. Despite it being an unusual subject for Technic, I nevertheless plan to include all those "traditional" Lego Technic supercar functions on this MOC, such as steering, suspension, and transmission. Currently, the chassis is about 2/3 of the way complete, with most of the mechanical features now in place. In between the seats is a fake V8 engine connected to a massive 4-speed transmission shifted using the rotary catches from the 42083 set. The transmission is shifted using the paddle to the right of the driver's seat - it uses a rubber band mechanism similar to the one on the 42083 to rotate the catches 90 degrees for each press of the paddle. The gear ratios are 2.08:1, 1.33:1, 1.25:1, and 1:1.25. Both axles will have live axle suspension, and the steering mechanism includes a working steering wheel. This MOC will have no motors, and it is in fact my first MOC without any motorized functions. To increase visibility of the mechanics, I plan on incorporating a removable body and floorplan to expose the chassis down to its bare bones. I may also include a customizable floorplan to increase playability (like the Creator Ford Mustang set with all its customizable features). I may also include some accessories to go along with the model, such as a canoe or kayak. PS - shoutout to my friend for providing me brochures of the RV. Had all the information I needed to get the building process going. Photos:
  8. Hey guys, here's a new project I started recently. It is a model of the Volvo EC350E excavator, featuring pneumatics and SBrick control. As of right now I have the superstructure completed. All electronics for the model are contained within here. At the center of the superstructure is a 8043-style gearbox that switches the 3 L motors between left track, right track, and superstructure rotation, respectively, and boom valve, jib valve, and bucket valve, respectively. A M motor powers the gearbox shifting and the pneumatic pump simultaneously. This is possible thanks to a clutch gear on the gearbox shifting mechanism, allowing the motor to drive the pump even when shifting is complete. This will be my last MOC before I go off to college. I move in next Thursday, so I'll try to get at least most of it done before I leave. I won't be building as much anymore with college starting - maybe a MOC or two over breaks. However, if I don't get this MOC done before I leave I'll try to finish it in small increments in the weekends I come home. Photos:
  9. Good day! Sometimes I make MOCs that don't deserve a topic, or simply have WIP concepts that I don't publish . This will serve as a place where I post my WIP creations that may end being a MOC , and small sized MOCs which are too simple to post a video or create a topic.
  10. Been wanting to try this for awhile. Not bad. :-D Real windshield on the left, dyed one on the right. Basically I boiled a cup of water, added a teaspoon of turmeric, and dropped the windshield in and stirred it every now and then. I did this a couple of times, each time taking the windshield out and reheating the turmeric water until it was boiling again, and repeated the process. Afterwards I let it cool and then rinsed it off under some cold water. When you look at it with your own eyes next to a real trans-yellow windshield, the color is pretty close, but I could see adding another half (maybe whole) teaspoon of turmeric to the mixture. Right now it's a little bit on the green side. Adding more turmeric would definitely be an improvement.
  11. DarthMario

    [WIP] The Orville (Help Needed)

    I am currently trying to build The Orville, and before I got too deep into he process, I wanted to see if the engines were even possible to do in Lego while staying true to the shape of the actual ship. I have had minor success; I have the oval shape, but the part I am stuck on is how to make the outer edge higher than the inner edge. I am trying to avoid huge gaps between the angles because the ship has extremely sleek lines and that would ruin the aesthetic. Here is what I have so far in terms of a proof of concept: Reference model: here
  12. I switched this to a general LEGO Pokemon topic since I got carried away haha ============== Here we go, I edited the post with final pics. Suggestions, comments, hatemail, it's all welcome. =============== Features: •Amazing movement! •Mouth opening on command! •Excellent shaping, much fun, beautiful color! •The only pieces not available in LBG are the 4 wedges along the jaw and the 2 wedges on the tail. •The head is hollow, maybe 2 minifigs and a small cat can fit in there... LEGO Steelix by Henchmen4Hire, on Flickr LEGO Steelix by Henchmen4Hire, on Flickr LEGO Steelix Guts by Henchmen4Hire, on Flickr LEGO Pokemon by Henchmen4Hire, on Flickr
  13. Hey guys, here's a rather simple project I recently started. I wanted to build something that's highly playable and not too complex, so I decided to do a tracked vehicle of some sort. However, this one will be unique in that steering is not done by tank drive, or by traditional steering. It's by an articulation joint like a front loader. This model will have all-track drive, articulated steering, and a pneumatically tipped bed. The bed will be on the rear module, which will contain no motors. All motorization is done on the front module and the only things passing through the articulation joint/turntable are the drive axle and pneumatic hoses. Propulsion is done by a single L motor above the front differential, steering is done by a M motor that controls 2 linkages going in opposite directions with worm gears, and the pneumatics are controlled by a M motor that simultaneously drives a 6L pump and Sariel's autovalve. The mechanical elements do take up plenty of room in the front module, but once the bodywork is in place most of it should be concealed. My main purpose in building this MOC is to find an opportunity to really use dark azure Technic pieces. My Grapple Truck I6 and my current WIP Red Beryl X were both started with the intent of using dark azure pieces, but both times I was faced with a limited collection of them. I've recently ordered some extra dark azure pieces off Bricklink, and considering a cab on a model this size shouldn't really use that much pieces I think this finally be my first dark azure MOC. If you guys have any suggestions for me, please let me know. Photos:
  14. Hey guys, here's a project I've recently started working on. It's been a while since I built anything as I've been quite busy for the past couple months. Anyways, this will be a supercar project. My 4th supercar so far, hence the name "Supercar IV". To be honest I've run out of creative names after giving "Red Beryl GT" to my BrickFair 2018 MOC, so I'm happy to take suggestions if any of you have a better name in mind. From the photos below this may seem like a mere rebuild of my Red Beryl GT, but this MOC comes with several upgrades: A 4WD drive system A 4-speed gearbox, controlled remotely This will be my first supercar to contain such features, and if everything turns out well this could be my most mechanically advanced supercar MOC up to date. The presence of a 4WD system makes it easy to install a 4-speed gearbox, as I took advantage of the two gears of different sizes on the old differential serving as a central differential. I wished that I was able to make the shifting mechanism smaller or use a stepper mechanism for it, but a stepper mechanism is a bit too big and complex to fit in the available space and there is too much structure around the gearbox to make the shifting mechanism any smaller. Although the mechanism appears obstructive as of now, building seats and a roof over it should help conceal it. I am also planning on installing Brickstuff LEDs to this MOC, as well as potentially adding a 4th motorized functions (such as motorized doors or a motorized rear wing). If you guys have any suggestions for me, please let me know. EDIT: I've decided to name the MOC "Red Beryl X", as it's essentially an upgraded sequel to my Red Beryl GT. Photos:
  15. Greetings! After coming out of my Dark Ages and tackling both the excellent Ultimate 8043 & 42009 (see below) designed by Jurgen Krooshoop, I was hungry for another Lego Technic challenge. But I felt rather lost at this point: without a large collection of loose Technic pieces at my beck and call, motorized MOCs which weren't heavily based on existing Lego sets would require some hefty Bricklink investments from my part. Fortunately, a fifteen-percent-off-everything anniversary sale at a local toy store with an expansive Lego section made the choice for my next project a lot simpler: they had the 42043 Arocs set that had already been calling out to my wallet since way back in oh-fifteen. They also had a certain little gizmo called an SBrick in stock, which I had heard quite a few things about. My previous builds had involved standard PF receivers and remotes, so it seemed like an interesting new challenge to incorporate this new-fangled blue-toothed thing-a-ma-jig into my already-slightly-more-challenging attempt at "RC-afying" the Mercedes. I'm already a little way into the project, but I've already made a few false starts and moronic missteps, so I figured it might be educational for others to document my frantic flailing about experiences, so that they might avoid my (myriad) mistakes. The first thing I did, of course, was to order the necessary PF components: a Servo Motor, an L-Motor, an 20cm extension cable, and a couple of PF lights. In hindsight, this already turned out to be my first mistake: I hadn't done my research properly and hadn't realized that the SBrick requires an extension cable to be hooked up to a battery box. This meant I was probably going to be one cable short, since I didn't think the cable for the L-motor used for drive would reach. While I waited for these crucial parts to be delivered, I began preliminary work on the Arocs proper. After completing most of bags 1 to 3, I had three loosely connected main sections of the truck - the cabin housing the 6-cilinder engine and the L-motor that came with the set, the gearbox with the outriggers, and the rear section with the dumping bed and the differentials. In my mind, I could already see a problem arising: there was a drivetrain going from the rear wheels all the way to the engine in the front of the truck, which would obviously make the pistons move as you move the truck along. I already guessed I would be severing this connection by remove the driveshaft with the CV joint and attaching an L-motor in the center somewhere. Which would render the engine, the drivetrain, etc. utterly useless. This was not acceptable - not in the last place because my kids had unanimously decided that seeing the pistons in my 42009 mobile crane move was officially The Coolest Thing Ever™. So I fiddled about a bit before connection these three main sections, and eventually came up with this: Might be a bit hard to see, but... Basically, I placed an additional small gear directly in-between the L-motor and the gearbox, which allows it to power the axles and gears connected to the piston engine when in use. So, it wouldn't be connected to the drive anymore, but at least there could be some motorized eye-candy when one swung back the cabin and fired up the main engine. It wasn't long before my motors and such arrived, so the first I tried to accomplish was to connect the L-motor for the drive somewhere. One nifty solution I'd found involved replacing the engine in the front and using the long drive-train to power the rear wheels -- a technique I thoroughly rejected for several reasons: It seemed inefficient, and COOLEST. THING. EVER. So I figured I'd just bolt the bloody thing directly to the rear diff, as I'd also seen in this fascinating and classically scored tutorial vid by RC-master PPUNG daddy: It didn't sit right with me to just attach the motor with two pins like that though, so I have attempted to support it a little bit better without messing up the way the rear suspension works too much. Right now, it looks something like this: Not exactly perfect, but it seems to work well enough, even when I give the suspension a bit of a work-out. Next came the steering. My first attempt was based on this extremely helpful Youtube video by yu shine: Basically, this involved just connecting the Servo directly to the standard HOG steering mechanism for the Arocs, just below the two orange lights-slash-knobs at the top which you're supposed to turn. It seemed the most simple and elegant and -- being but a simple soul -- this naturally appealed to me greatly. It also didn't require the purchase of any additional parts, and left the mechanically unique way the steering on the Arocs model works intact. At this point I was able to put together a sort of prototype for the RC driving, by dangling the SBrick from the battery box and just hooking everything up in a makeshift manner. After installing the app, setting up the official 42043S profile, and playing around with my handiwork for a bit, I discovered the following issues: The L-motor was supplying quite a bit of power, making the truck actually pretty hard to control. Of course, there was a lot of weight left to be added at this point, so I was willing to reserve judgement for the time being, but given that my kids no doubt want to play around with this thing as well it'd be nice if I could prevent them from semi-accidentally ramming a massive Lego vehicle into, well, practically everything. Not sure how I could address though, other than from the software side. Placing the Servo motor where it was, behind the battery box, didn't actually fit all that well. The battery box itself actually pushed up against the servo when inserted, bending it back by at least a stud, which also frustrated my attempts to secure it in place a bit further. The steering was a bit... inadequate. The problems regarding the steering I recalled Sariel already mentioning in were only exacerbated here. It felt imprecise and rather unresponsive, and it didn't help that there was quite a bit of play in the wheels even with the Servo hooked up, meaning they weren't necessarily centered even when it was. So in the end, I stripped the away the steering mechanism and the wheels up front until I was left with this: After that, I decided to pony up and order the parts which -- after careful visual inspection of PPung's tutorial -- I figured I'd still need to mount the servo at the bottom, between the two sets of front wheels. So, mostly a set of gear racks and gears, in addition to some beams and various connectors used for bracing. This also gave me the chance to simultaneously order an extra extension cable from the same supplier, since it was pretty clear I was going to be needing it if I wanted to have any hope of hooking up the drive motor to the SBrick up front. And now, we wait... Although, to pass the time, I busied myself with rebuilding the back of the cabin, which I had previously taken apart to place the servo motor. I didn't need all the gears used for the steering mechanism, of course, and I figured I'd be better off trying to mount the SBrick in this space instead. For the moment, I came up with the following: I did notice the two black Technic pins still sticking out back there, and peeking ahead in the manual revealed that these will be used to help brace the pneumatic crane, once the time comes to attach that beast. As far as I can tell, that should still be possible even with the SBrick where it is, but no doubt I'll have screwed up somehow. We'll find out in the next update, hopefully! (Assuming, quite optimistically, that there is actual interest in such a thing. )
  16. Here's my latest project, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle WIP...It's a modular build in a 2x6 baseplate layout (48x48) that breaks down into 3 sections. There's a subway with an NYC passenger train in between the sewer lair and New York City. From the city sidewalk there's 2 sewer grates that connect to the turtle lair and training weapons with power functions in the lair for playability. Lots of LED lights throughout. I've been working on this build since September of last year and hope to finish in April.. LEGO WIP Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle Sewer Lair by Ben Pitchford, on Flickr LEGO WIP Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle Sewer Lair by Ben Pitchford, on Flickr Lego Wip Diorama by Ben Pitchford, on Flickr Lego Wip by Ben Pitchford, on Flickr Lego Wip by Ben Pitchford, on Flickr My Flickr Page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/127491317@N08/with/44971238321/
  17. Hey Eurobricks! I'm working on another large scale build but thought I'd update along the way...still finishing the subway then onto the streets and city buildings. Enjoy and feel free to critique! Lego Wip by Ben Pitchford, on Flickr Lego Wip by Ben Pitchford, on Flickr Lego Wip Diorama by Ben Pitchford, on Flickr LEGO WIP Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle Sewer Lair by Ben Pitchford, on Flickr My Flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/127491317@N08/
  18. It's about a time, since I've been ended my dark ages and now it looks like my way will be rather smaller attempts and "projects", then bigger and more sophisticated ones. My older builds had their own topics here and here, but I don't think that all of my next builds will be suitable for separate topics, so I decided to make this one, where I have intention to add all of my publishable builds. And for the beginning, here is my wip small manual buggy. Buggies are favourite Technic builds, there are many of them in all sizes, shapes and qualities. This one is intended to be small and simple, all manualy working. Now it has front and rear suspesion, openable cabin, steering and rear wheels conected to fake engine. I'd like to improve rear axle suspension, add HOG and steering wheel and some details here and there. And finaly adjust color scheme, although I'm not very disturbed with this clor vomit in this type of vehicle.
  19. Below some pictures of a WIP i'm working on. Plan is to make it fully working with rc pf. This means, forward-reverse, left-right, working PTO, and rear hitch. This is my first ever MOC using pf, rc and studless building. You might say i'm kind of a 'old school' Technic builder. Hope you enjoy, comments and questions are welcome.
  20. I really liked Nexo Knights, and I really liked all the little nods towards older castle themes without established locations potentially taking place in its world. So, I decided to try and create a Nexo Knights-refurbished version of two classic sets from the Fright Knights using LDD: Witch's Magic Manor & Night Lord's Castle, albeit combined into one, so that the Magic Manor serves as a sort of hideout/base under the Night Lord's Castle. The bit that I am currently stuck on is a suitable castle gate. The simple wooden doors of the official Knighton Castle set looked a bit weird, and as such I am trying to create a more sci-fi looking portcullis structure or portcullis alternative, in tr. neon orange of course. So far, I have tried using a bunch of 30064 stud/stick pieces (difficult to create a suitably sized structure without running into difficulty connecting the two sets of bars into a structure that can move as a single piece), the large sword pieces from Clay's mechsuit (as with the original use, strange-looking due to the lack of depth combined with the pattern and width) and finally the 4218 rolling gate pieces (serviceable, except the only source of these in tr. neon orange is over two decades old, and I'd like to actually be able to build this thing in real life at some point). If anyone has any recommendations, I'd be glad to hear them.
  21. bamsham363

    [MOC] Ferrari Dino 246

    New build still a WIP, but happy now with the shaping, just need to finalise the internals and doors, let me know what you think.
  22. Hi all, be kind, this is the first time I've actually started a topic here, and shared pics of my lego fumblings. I've been away from lego for 20 years, and then my GF bought me the lego millenium falcon for christmas, and it's totally rekindled my love (for Lego, not the GF, I loved her already...). Like many, I found the S-foils on the most recent T-70 X-wings rather underwhelming. The X-wings in the movie look so cool, aggressive, dynamic, and the new engine pods and the way the wings fold to become one single plane in cruise mode is very slick indeed. The Lego version is significantly less slick in this regard, and this bothered me. As is well documented, the wings don't even meet, let alone combine into one, the lower wing is studs down, which means the ugly plate underside is on show, and the dreaded blue rubber bands, both look out of place at the back of the engine pods, and pull the wings at an angle. I will say that I like the folding mechanism as a play function, and did not want to loose it. So first off, the closed position: When they're closed, there is no gap, no angle difference, and to all intents and purposes, it appears as though it's one single wing, just as it should. And now, open Again, no angle change due to rubber band tension. The bands are still being used, but I found a way to integrate them such that they pull the wings closed as they should, but not unevenly, and within the forward profile of the wings so that they're not obvious. In fact they now look like some kind of power cables on the engine undesides. Here's some close ups: I'll go into more detail on this tomorrow if anyone's interested, but essentially the now studs up lower wings have some 2x1 modified plates with pin loops with pins going into 1x1 technic bricks as the method of attaching them, with one of the pins sticking out for the bands to locate on. The bands then go around the back of another pin that replaced a cream coloured short pin on the body of the ship, then go up inside the upper wing engine where there's one of thes guys for them to hook on to: It has as much tension as the original system, but looks alot slicker, though i will admit it is a bit trickier to put together. the bands also seem to hold the lower wing onto the engine a bit too, which is nice. The rear landing gear is rubbish on the original, and i wanted something that would retract cleanly. The real ship has landing gear that emerges from the slopes between the curved engine and the wing. This seemed impossible to duplicate at this scale, and with the stuff for the new folding mechanism, so did landing gear on the engines too, so i mounted it to the body, at its widest part. It folds up and becomes part of the body curve at the back, which is nice. I apologise for the crappy lighting, again, I'll get better pics if there's interest. I may swap the grey part for black, but I don't have any at the moment. Elsewhere on the ship, I moved the cockpit back one stud, and started playing around reprofiling the nose a little. This is the next area for my attention and is a work in progress. Please feel free to comment, I'm open for any constructive criticism!
  23. Hey everyone, first post here and kinda of a new to tecnhic. So, keeping things short, I started work on a "Flatbed crane truck", and I would like to hear some suggestions about it. I am thinking on adding a small crane to the back of it keeping its open area. I am having some difficulties with the steering sistem and where to put the "fake motors". I left some photos on imgur, go check it out. https://imgur.com/a/91796Xe Thanks in advance.
  24. Hey guys, here's another post-BrickFair MOC I have planned that has an interesting backstory: While working on the CLAAS Challenger 95E I decided to make a crane attachment for it like the 42054. Of course, I wanted to make it much better as the 42054's crane didn't seem too appealing to me. Unfortunately, the crane ended up being way too big because I wasn't paying attention to the scale I was building at. I even put a directional gearbox beneath it to control two crane functions. The end result was something very similar to the 42054's crane attachment but ended up way out of proportion to the tractor itself, and I unfortunately had to scratch that idea. But something about this crane stands out to me so much (despite it being essentially another 9397) that I hated to get rid of it, which ultimately led me to propose another MOC. A grapple truck was something I've wanted to make since my early days of MOCs - I've made one back in 2014 but this one will, of course, be much more streamlined and realistic. I don't plan on giving it remote control (as I don't want to deal with wire organizing) but instead a single motor (either M motor or L motor) to drive a distribution gearbox that will control various functions. This would also be a good opportunity for me to use dark azure pieces, as I plan on making the cab that color. As of right now, I have the crane arm completed, but here's my tentative list of features: Single PF M or L motor, driving a distribution gearbox that would control: Outriggers (using Arocs gear racks/brackets) Turntable Boom elevation 2nd part of boom (whatever that part controlled by the small LA is called) Other manual functions would include: Extension Grabber (I'll probably replace it with something better - perhaps 42006's claw?) Basic features/functions would be: 2 rear axles connected to straight-4 piston engine underneath the cabin (double rear wheels, of course) HoG steering Tilting cabin (to reveal engine) Like the other MOC I recently started, I'll probably wait until after BrickFair to really work on it when I'll have all my pieces available after I take apart my BrickFair MOCs. If you guys have any suggestions for me, let me know in the comments. Anyways, here's some pics of that crane:
  25. Hello, For my latest project I'm building a supercar bit by bit, building the separate components first before assembling them. Starting with the Carbon Fiber Monocoque Tub: This one was for a great part inspired by the McLaren MP4-12C chassis, that one is said to weigh less than 80 kilograms (). (And guess what, mine weighs even less! ) This one wil most likely undergo many changes in order to fit with, yet to build, components. I'm considering using a carbon "cage" instead of a "tub" for my car though. But I won't know for sure until I start on the bodywork. Next is the Driveline: A Twin Turbo 3.8L V8 with 7-speed dual clutch gearbox and kinetic energy recovery system (KERS). I used some pictures from the Laferrari engine as reference. Without the intake manifold (those black plugs are where the rear half axles connect to the gearbox). I'm very satisfied with this component, It fits barely in the engine bay behind the tub though but I guess that's how it is supposed to be. If there was room to spare they would have just fitted in a bigger engine . Since I had these nice Ferrari stickers I might as well make this a Ferrari engine . That's it for now, perhaps I'll finish the next component tomorrow.