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Found 162 results

  1. "The Golden Frog" Restaurant (Restaurant "Zum Goldenen Frosch") Alost two years after my last MOC it's finally time to reveal my latest work. This is a modular building with a restaurant - "The Golden Frog" (or "Zum Goldenen Frosch" in german) on the ground floor. The second floor houses a psychotherapists office, and the top two floors feature an apartment. Summary: Parts: 5650 (excluding minifigs) Design: designed in stud.io from May to June 2021 and from December 2021 until March 2022 (got hard stuck with the design last summer and worked on other projects for a while). Highlights include the roof, where I tried to mimic the typical look of a copper plate roof as found on many older european buildings, the facade featuring lots of snot work, and the glass spiral staircase leading from third to the fourth floor. As usual, the model also has full interior. The color scheme using bright light orange might not be everyone's cup of tea, but I really like the color, so there you are As usual, head over to flickr for even more pictures: https://flic.kr/s/aHBqjzRQmw The copper plate roof. I'll leave it to you to figure out how it is built - I'll just say that all pieces are firmly connected. The restaurant's namesake is featured above the windows and door on the ground floor. Interior of the restaurant. The restaurant also features a piece by a local modern artist. It's cryptically titled "Entrails of a Star Destroyer". On the second floor, a psychotherapist has his office. Many of his patients find the loud ticking of the grandfather clock to be distracting. He enjoys analyzing their reactions to it. The third floor is the first of a two floor apartment. This floor has a kitchen, eating area and home-office working space. The luxurious kitchen has a big fridge and a kitchen island with further seating. The glass spiral staircase leads up to the final floor. It is built using panels. Curved slopes with cut-out create the nice organic shape of the banister. The top floor is less spacious then the ones below. It features the bedroom, couch and TV area and the bathroom. The bathroom features a big, open shower (with a coloured glass wall preventing spray down the staircase), toilet and wash basin. I hope you enjoyed my MOC - looking forward to any feedback, constructive criticism or praise you have to offer More pics on flickr: https://flic.kr/s/aHBqjzRQmw Tobias
  2. simon84

    [MOC] Toy Store

    After some time I finally found the time to finish my fifth Modular Building. With pleasure I present you my new work the "Toy Store". The "Toy Store" is a classic modular building, built on a 32x32 baseplate and consists of about 4420 bricks. The MOC consists of 4 modules (incl. roof). The base floor contains a well-stocked toy store. In addition to 3 display windows, it contains a small Lego assortment, a Starwars-themed section, sporting goods, remote-controlled planes and helicopters, teddy bears and much more. A corner staircase leads directly from the sidewalk to the terrace and 1st floor stores. On the left is a kebab shop with a small outdoor area with bar tables. On the right is Milos Hat Store - a small hat store with many huts. Another corner staircase between the stores leads to the law office of Mr. Right & Co on the 2nd floor. Clients are greeted by the paralegal in a small entrance hall. Through a narrow corridor you get to the lawyer's office. You can also see the whole project under MOC-113849 - Toy Store on Rebrickable. There you can also buy the building instruction as PDF for the rebuilding. Best you make yourselves a picture of it, much fun!
  3. paupadros

    [MOC] Florentine Palazzo

    Fine dine and get some pictures taken at the Florentine Palazzo! How am I so bad at keeping myself promises. Last time out, with the release of Octan Avenue, I thought that a full year between modulars was long enough. Well... this one took two years . Anyway, I think it was worth the wait. The Florentine Palazzo is my twelfth modular building and my fourth corner modular. Free Instructions for this model available at Rebrickable! This model went through a gigantic number of changes. It started as two separate projects that I joined into one. On one side, I had project code name "Worcester" (yes, I give my projects code names ), a new modular building on two 16x32 baseplates (à la Pet Shop or Bookshop) with a distinctly English architecture. Base inspiration was this pair of building in the town of (you guessed it) Worcester. I still might pick up this idea sometime, but it wasn't quite working out then. The other project was a redesign of my second modular, the Italian Villa (my first EB topic I believe) to make instructions. My techniques then were not the most elaborate and the builds weren't exactly designed for stability. Upgrading the Italian Villa would have meant a whole lot of changes probably, so I scrapped that too. But then I thought about doing a brand new modular in a similar vein, which is the Florentine Palazzo! Since it was going to get instructions, I thought about what I really would like to have in modular town. A companion to the Parisian Restaurant came to mind immediately. None of the subsequent buildings match its elegance in shapes and overall refined look. In terms of overall size and details, I tried to get close to the restaurant's greatness. As of late, I prefer looking at drawings rather than real buildings for inspiration. They leave more to the imagination and make me feel less like a plageriser. Anyway, the main inspiration for the palazzo was a building in the Alsatian town of Colmar (drawing · real building). It is not really a building that through one of my usual Google Maps trips I would pick out as inspiration, but the drawing made the creative juices start flowing. Initially, I tried to recreate the building faithfully, but I soon found that joining the upper "towers" closer together made for a more cohesive and interesting façade, so I went down that route. These days I rarely do a full 32x32 baseplate as a single building and the space next to the staircase led perfectly to a completely different kind of architecture next door. One of the styles of architecture that I had been wanting to put in modular form for a while is the architecture of Malta. To me it just feels like the architecture one would find in Sicily but with delightfully colourful timber balconies dotted about to give it interest. As some of you may know, restrain in colour choices really isn't my thing ( *cough *cough Baseplate Alley anyone? ) so this was an interesting exercise in exactly that. Anyway, I had so much fun "carving" details in the plain tan façade to the point that I might prefer this bit over the entire model. I particularly like how the façade keeps sloping back as it goes up. The buuilding was inspired by the Palazzo Ferreria in Valetta. ================== Interiors: Interiors have never been my biggest strength and probably will never be at this rate. Still, I've tried my best to make them quite interesting. Have I succeeded? Hopefully 1. Ground floor: Initially, I wanted to build a post office, but before doing any of the interiors, I showed the building to a friend of mine and he told me something along the lines of "Are you crazy? You should definitely be building a restaurant there!". To be fair, it does look like a prime spot for a restaurant, plus it matches the Parisian Restaurant, so restaurant it was. On top of that, the alleyway I had built under the Maltese house could theoretically be used for bringing stock to the restaurant, so that too makes sense. I think it turned out rather nice honestly. 2. Middle floor: Part of the problem of doing the exterior before the interior is that sometimes one has to mould the interior concept to what is already there. Ideally, the restaurant would have taken up two floors, but the exterior stairs with the fountain underneath was way too cute to remove. And having waiters go up and down exterior stairs didn't quite feel right. That's when the idea of a photography studio came, mostly because there was a dark room on the attic which would be pretty much be perfect for a developing room. The middle floor includes the cameras on sale plus a studio for studio portraiture. 3. Attic: The developing room was fun to build. An enlarger, three trays for developer, stop and fixer mixtures, a cupboard full of chemicals and a sink. I also had a photo drying string, but, honestly, Studio (where I make the instructions) is so crap at dealing with flexible parts that I deleted it after much frustration ================== To see everything that I haven’t been able to explain in words, feel free to take a look at the model yourselves, many of the “how was this/that made” are visible! 3D MODEL And, of course, the free instructions that you can use to build this model for yourselves! FREE INSTRUCTIONS =================== Thanks for reading through and hope you like the model!
  4. Middle Eastern Palace MOC - with MILS Plate I originally built this quite some time ago, straight onto three 16 x 32 baseplates, and needless to say it was very flimsy. I have given it a revamp by building a MILS Plate style base, using the tan masonry bricks. The model is now a lot sturdier and easier to move around. Middle Eastern Palace - MILS Plate by Samuel Sheppard, on Flickr Middle Eastern Palace - MILS Plate by Samuel Sheppard, on Flickr Thanks for looking! Sheps
  5. Scorpion Palace MOC Pieces: Approx. 1,650 Inspirations: Scorpion Palace 7418 Scorpion Palace MOC by Samuel Sheppard, on Flickr Scorpion Palace MOC by Samuel Sheppard, on Flickr Scorpion Palace MOC by Samuel Sheppard, on Flickr Thanks for looking! Sheps
  6. bricksboy

    [MOC] Bus Terminal Modular Building

    [MOC]Bus Terminal Modular Building I have finally completed the build. I am very satisfied with the outcome The building comes with two buses, one in countryside style and the other one in metro style. The building's first floor is a waiting lobby and ticket booth. The second floor is a coffee shop for minifigures having a cup of coffee and cake. The third floor(roof) is a little garden for minifigures to relax. I also created a review video. Welcome to take a look: More MOC on my homepage: https://www.bricksboy.com/moc
  7. "GREAT SCOTT!" A double-corner style modular of the famous Clock Tower / Court House from "Back to the Future!" What a joy and challenge it was to design this MOC! Not only was it a challenge to match the look of the building (classical architecture is particularly sensitive to proportions) but also make sure it fit within the confines of the Modular Building style. To limit the piece count (and because the inside of the building was never meaningfully shown on-screen), the interior of this MOC is bare-bones but functional (see more pics on Rebrickable). This leaves you with plenty of fun and opportunity to design your own look. Anyone interested can find the instructions here and on Rebrickable.com!
  8. Dakar A

    [MOC] Adaptive Architects

    Adaptive Architects is a 32x32 modular building, and the third fully custom modular that I've designed and created, from initial sketches to final build with instructions- the complete Lego product cycle, as far as a single person can at least! THE BUILDING The building was done in the style of a turn of the century American brick building, that has been rehabilitated as an adaptive reuse project, preserving the façade of the original building, but improving it for modern efficiency standards with corrugated iron woven into the structure of the existing brick. I wanted to play with the idea of a "solid" façade mixed in with the very square glass and metal structures that you see in a lot of swanky new developments in major downtowns. Of course, it also has to fit with the other modular buildings in order to really be called a successful modular building, right? The in-set porch gives a pleasing difference in depth compared to the rest of the modular street, and I think that it looks right at home with other American style modulars such as the Detective's Office and Brick Bank- the roof height of the "original" sections of the building match up with the existing rooflines, while the adaptive section rises above, both conveying how it was an addition on top of the existing building, AND giving a sort of observation platform to the rest of the modular street- a perspective that I feel like fits the adaptive reuse idea of melding the past (sight lines to the other buildings) with the future (lots of glass letting in light and opening the space above the more crammed street below). Of course, with such a heavenly, god-like view, who should get the penthouse suite but the head architect of the firm? I made liberal usage of the 1x2x2 window frame as cast iron legs for furniture throughout the building, both to decrease the overall number of part types required to build it AND because I feel like that sort of solid, thick steel construction is big in that neo-industrial aesthetic these days. I borrowed the design for the drafting boards from 4000034 System House- I just created my own arm out of the 3L bar pieces and adapters instead of the 3d printed solution or brick-built alternate used there. I also changed the boards to green, because all my experience with drafting boards has had them green, and not white! Finally, the lobby is the most detailed and colorful, in the Modular tradition. There's an architectural model, some project the firm is known for; the reception desk replete with minimalist logo for the firm; and a seating area with those moderately uncomfortable velvet stool things that are almost definitely there to look good and not be sat on! THE DESIGN PROCESS The initial form for this build came the way I always do it- some mood board research on Google, combined with ideas I amass day to day, and then some sketching to try and rough out a shape for the build. As you can see here, the porch has been a constant, even if the design of the rest of the building shifted around a good bit. However, as these things go, I wasn't happy with my first pass. It was too blocky and uniform. It didn't have the whimsy and charm that the Modular buildings embody for me. And that top gable didn't translate the way I'd hoped it would. So it was back to the drawing board. As you can see, this sketch ended up being MUCH closer to the final design. Parts were retroactively added, but the majority of the shaping came from this drawing. I find that combining the unlimited palette of Stud.io with the conceptual freedom of sketching does a great job in helping me to refine an idea without having access to the bricks needed to rapidly prototype. The boondoggle of the build was this gable, however. What I wanted to do was to have plates make up the roof portion, and a nice clean façade beneath them. What I quickly realized, however, was that the Lego system is not friendly to SNOT angles without an overhang, and that I would need a number of parts that do not exist (in dark orange, no less) to accomplish my vision the way I'd...envisioned it. So back to the drawing board (you can see my sketch for the roof done with standard roof bricks in the sketch above- that left page was done after the one to the right). Once I'd acquiesced to using plain old roof bricks, the construction of the build really flowed from there. This is my second draft, with incomplete interior and missing a lot of detailing on the upper floors. But the overall shape and character of the building was complete at this point. The little cornice/ornamentation at the top of the left column of the building took a bit of iteration. I was trying to go for a sort of wrought iron/rusted steel vibe with it, pulling inspiration from many of the buildings on my mood board. Ultimately I went with a more textured version of this that separated the brown section below and the wrought iron section on top, with a bit of the medium azure to carry through the accent color and really make it pop. FINAL THOUGHTS Thank you for reading and viewing my MOC! I'm really proud of this build and happy with how it came out. I feel that I successfully carried out the concept I was going for, and capturing the aesthetic I wanted. My favorite part is probably using the hinge bricks in brown as detail on the 2nd floor in order to get a more compact "recessed" pressed metal detail. Instructions are available through Rebrickable!
  9. This is my modular take on the Beatles concert on January 30th, 1969 at No. 3 Savile Row, then known as the Apple Corps HQ and studio. (it's back to being a house and hasn't been a studio since the mid-70's) I used half of set 76108 - Sanctum Sanctorum Showdown for the front, with a back I designed myself as that set was close enough to look passable as the original London building. I also specifically made the building more grayscale, as if the Beatles are bringing light and color to the world. You can view the photo of the original building as it is now in spoiler tags below. (WARNING: it's an very large photo from Wikipedia!) It's not my photo, either: NOTE: The following LEGO modular building was constructed for my father and his modular building collection, as he bought the bricks and I built it for him according to my design. (per his request) The figures used are from set - 21306 Yellow Submarine, and I would have included Billy Preston too as he played electric keyboard that day and for several weeks before in recording sessions, but my dad sadly misplaced the figure I created and he can't find it. (also, if you can't find George, don't worry - he is behind the chimney pipes. You can't quite see him, but he is there.) The Yellow Submarine film logo printed part will be replaced with a Beatles logo from the 2021 Art set when it arrives. The eight studs out front are for the figures (not yet built) to stop and listen to the concert. I couldn't find a picture of the back, so it's improvised, same as the inside details are fictional too. Also, I didn't include stairs in the building, because I was trying to just flesh it out in basics and worry about furniture and stuff later. The first floor (or ground, as some might call it) has a fireplace, couch, grandfather clock, a dining table with four chairs, and another table lamp. On the second floor is a bedroom with bed, cabinet, writing desk, a upright piano and a floor lamp. (I was thinking about John Lennon and Yoko Ono's week-long "bed-in for peace in Vietnam" when I designed this level) However, as Yoko is reputed to have broken up the Beatles, this will suffice for her as a figure. The items up here on the third floor include a table w/ two chairs, a record player and a lamp. There are also four bookcases of vinyl records (one for each Beatle) on this floor, along with one empty one. "I'd like to say thank you on behalf of the group and ourselves, and I hope we've passed the audition." - John Lennon, 1969 (at the conclusion of the concert and as heard on the album "Let it Be") My dad designed the Ringo fig's drum-set, and I have three of this stove-top part on order for amplifiers. Any Thoughts, Comments or Questions? I'd be happy to answer them! Also, side note: if you are a Beatles fan and have several hours to kill, watch the Get Back documentary by Peter Jackson. It's split in three parts and has nine hour overall runtime, but it's awesome.
  10. DK_Titan

    LEGO 10270 Bookshop XL MOD

    We have a long-term ambition to build our own - enlarged - versions of all (more or less) LEGO modular buildings. Previously we have built two buildings based on 10251 Brick Bank, and we have now finished the next two - a 76 cm high modification of 10270 Bookshop. It is not only the height of the buildings that has made this a comprehensive project, but also the fact that all floors are fully furnished and equipped with light from Light My Bricks. For part of the interior, we have taken our starting point in 21328 Seinfeld and 10291 Queer Eye - The Fab 5 Loft, but in addition to this a lot of energy has been put into designing furniture, lamps and other furniture for all the floors.
  11. Dragon Fortress MOC Pieces: approx. 1,294. Modular building with ground floor, 1st floor, 2nd floor & roof. Inspirations: Lego 7419 Dragon Fortress. This MOC is my take on the classic Lego Orient Expedition set, which was quite easily the best historic Asian building produced by Lego (imo). Dragon Fortress MOC by Samuel Sheppard, on Flickr Dragon Fortress MOC by Samuel Sheppard, on Flickr Dragon Fortress MOC by Samuel Sheppard, on Flickr Dragon Fortress MOC by Samuel Sheppard, on Flickr Dragon Fortress MOC by Samuel Sheppard, on Flickr Thanks for looking! Sheps.
  12. sheo

    [MOC] Temple of Technology

    Another simple modular building which uses my old idea of spinning gimbals. Video demonstration: Instructions are available on Rebrickable. Thank you for your attention!
  13. Simple 3-story modular building with a working elevator. Building instructions are available on Rebrickable. Thank you for your attention!
  14. simon84

    [MOC] Post Office

    Finally it's done! For the past 10 months, whenever I've found the time, I've been working on my new project "Post Office". My first corner house from the Modular Building series. Besides the challenge of 45° angles in Lego to build nice and stable, the biggest challenge with the corner house was certainly the small space. You can also see the whole project under MOC-88507 - Post Office on Rebrickable. There you can also buy the building instructions as PDF. Best you make yourselves a picture of it, enjoy! As already mentioned, the Post Office is a modular corner building. The MOC consists of an old post office on the first floor, a design agency on the 1st floor and a small yoga studio on the top floor. The MOC has a lot of details on each floor. It is built on a standard 32 x 32 baseplate and includes 11 minifigures and a small mobile flower wagon. Ground Floor - Post Office On the first floor is an old classic post office with two counters. In the post office there are many details like a copier, a packing corner or postcard racks. Outside there is an ATM and a flower seller with a small flower wagon. 1st floor - Ninja Design - Design Agency On the 1st floor, next to the passage to the outside spiral staircase to the top floor, there is a small, fully equipped design agency with work desks, eating area and sitting area. Many details such as posters of print campaigns, awards, a bookshelf and a water dispenser enliven the modern furnished office space. 2nd floor - Yoga Studio Small yoga studio on the top floor with a locker room, a gong and a water dispenser. There is an old clock on the outside that can be operated from the roof. Roof From the 2nd floor, a ladder leads to the flat roof. The roof is deliberately kept simple next to two air conditioners has made a small bird comfortable on the roof.
  15. Kristel

    [MOC] Ocean Drive

    It’s been quite a while since I have designed a modular building - none since 2017 actually, according to the my albums over on Flickr!. There have been a few ideas, but they never went further than thought bubbles in my head. Then LEGO Ideas announced the “You’re the final piece” contest to create something that could become the design for a jigsaw puzzle. Jigsaws are what you will often find me doing when I’m not doing something with LEGO, so I knew I wanted to do something straight away. Quite a number of ideas came to mind, the first of which was a nature based one that turned out to be a disaster! Nothing more to be said on that one. Another idea was a set of townhouses. After playing around with some colour combinations, I settled on the different shades of blue, thinking that it looked like the various colours of the oceans around the world. And so “Ocean Drive” became my working title before I had even put two bricks together. The other inspiration was the colourful row houses that you find in parts of London. Particularly, the style of the windows on the first floor (the middle floor for those who are not Australian!). Ocean Drive is a busy street, with the kids currently on holidays for the summer. We have the twin girls being looked after by their grandma, who is about to receive a bunch of flowers from her neighbour. There’s a young boy playing with his cat, a handyman just finishing a job at number 3 and a teenage girl walking her pug. The buildings in this street started off as individual facades, each of them representing a 16-wide modular building. However, I ended up connecting them where there was trim using the 1x8 door rail as they just wouldn’t line up neatly, despite supposedly being the same dimensions! This also meant that they no longer met the modular building standard. Anyway, I couldn’t build a building like this and not have it meet the modular standard, so I made one in Dark Turquoise (arguably the most beautiful LEGO colour!). This is what it looks like as a 16-stud wide modular building: I then got a bee in my bonnet to do up instructions for the individual townhouse. You can download them via Rebrickable. More images available on Flickr. Hope you like it!
  16. Giacinto Consiglio

    [MOC] Old Town Tower

    Hi all, I'm very happy to introduce my latest modular building, coming after long months of university activities hijacking my free time. The set houses a leather shop in the far right building, inspired by Renaissance architecture, an empty house in the far left one, just sold to a new tenant, and a 13th century watchtower in the middle. Hope you like it!
  17. Leewan

    [MOC] Vintage Police Car

    Since the upcoming Modular Police Station won't come with a car, I've decided to build one myself : It's inspired by 40's American Police cars, and I did my best to make it look like the official sets so it won't look out of place in a Modular Street. The doors can open, and the roof and rear windscreen can be easily removed to access the interior, where there's room for two minifigs. Ideally it would be a police officer and the terrible Donut Thief buf of course I don't have them yet, so I used the minifigs from 40409 Hot Rod instead. Speaking of which, here's a comparison shot between the two cars : Instructions for this model can be found on Rebrickable : https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-59900/Leewan/vintage-police-car/ If you want to try different colour schemes, modify the model (to turn it into a civilian version for example), or simply see it under every possible angle, you can check the 3D model on Mecabricks : https://www.mecabricks.com/en/models/Jk2Ex0qPa9A PS : Oh, I almost forgot something, shame on me. I wanted to say a big thank you to @_shaddow_ for his help.
  18. Following the events of The LEGO Movie 2, Emmet Brickowski got to work on building Lucy and himself their dreamhouse again. He made it a bit bigger, a little better, and a lot stronger... just in case of any future Duplo attacks. It also features an attic for extra storage space, on top of the already-new second story. It is a modular style building, with removable floors and connection pins. The furniture (and house colors) were partially inspired by set 70831: Emmet's Dream House/Rescue Rocket, and a few of the official modular buildings. The car was modeled after the 1957 Plymouth Fury, made famous by the Stephen King book "Christine". (It's also a 1983 horror movie of the same name.) I took the original model of the Christine car made by user @hachiroku, which I would link to but can't seem to find anymore... The rear of the house has the entry point to the Duplo Fallout shelter. Why a fallout shelter? Well, the house is from the late 1950's after all... plus, the Duplo creatures are bit rougher in their attitudes and might go about doing something drastic if they don't get their way. Upstairs is the only bedroom, which is plenty big enough for Lucy & Emmett with their respective pictures on the wall above the bed. (They are stickers, sadly) Downstairs is the living and dining rooms, plus the kitchen. It also has the connection pins to hook into the modular building standard. I don't have any real world pictures of the vehicle (yet), but it's been built in real life for some years now... I just have to photograph it. Instead, here are the screenshots I took of the model in 2017 below: The car was modeled after a certain red '57 Plymouth Fury. I made the car black instead of red and took off the parts which I thought would be unstable. This meant taking off the rear wheel covers, revising the front bumper, adding different wheels and a few other small things. The rear of the car features a very ingenious set of taillights. Kudos to Hachiroku for this simple, elegant design! I've already started parts finding for the house part of this project (and I've made quite a dent in the price), so keep your eyes peeled for more pictures coming soon! (Also, I know the parts are kind of dusty, they've been sitting on my desk a while.) As usual, thoughts, complaints, comments and questions always welcome!
  19. Hey guys, I’m searching MOC instructions and LDD files for my near-future huge Lego city. I plan of course doing some MOC modulars but there are some very nice MOCs created by other people! I made a list of all the designers I found, I hope that list helps some other people who search modular instructions! Here are the MOCers with instructions that are definitely worth looking at (with no particular order): —Brick Ative (by @lookl and @Pakita) ebay Rebrickable —SteBrick (by @stef2280) Bricklink Stebrick Rebrickable —Snaillad (instructions on sale by @2013-lego) (by @snaillad) ebay Rebrickable —Sheo (by @sheo) Rebrickable —peedeejay (by @peedeejay) ebay Rebrickable —bricksandtiles (by @Giacinto Consiglio) ebay Rebrickable —Kristel (by @Kristel) Rebrickable —brickcitydepot (by @brickcitydepot) brickcitydepot ebay Amazon no starch press Barnes and Noble —Ryan Taggart (by @ryantaggart) snakebyte.dk LDD File of Construction Site –geo.gr (by @Gunman) ebay —BrickToyCo (by @Tobysan) BrickToyCo —hermez (by @hermez) Rebrickable —mestari (by @Mestari) Rebrickable —Huaojozu (by @Huaojozu) Rebrickable —2013-lego (by @2013-lego) (his own designed modulars) ebay Rebrickable —Duncaadkin0 (by @Dakar A) ebay —BrickBuildersPro (by @lgorlando) BrickBuildersPro ebay Amazon —The Brick Show Shop The Brick Show ebay —andrepsramos ebay TISMSTORE Rebrickable –Brickstruct Bricklink Brickstruct —10214 Alternative Build (by Garom) Rebrickable —The Magic House (by valgarise) Smart Bricks —Bob's Burgers (by jtam1608) ebay —Villa Maison (by @marcosbessa) (found the LDD file on LDD gallery as it’s no longer available in his own website): LDD File —Train Station (by @LegoWolf) (link to download the LDD file is on his Flickr): LDD File Here are some other ones (those which doesn't really interest me but I'm sure that will interest many others): —SkywardBrick Rebrickable —TheUniqueBrick TheUniqueBrick Rebrickable ebay —A *Deal* 4 U (by waltzking) Bricklink —Bricker and Co Bricker and Co ebay —Bjor Schoute ebay —sabriyo Sabriyo Customs ebay —Bauanleitungenmartin ebay —Berth Rebrickable —Soar Brick soarbrick ebay —gryffindorcommonroom ebay —scottcdavid ebay —sodabilly ebay —bolbuyk Rebrickable —deconstructor1 ebay —jval (Need for Brick) Bricklink Rebrickable —Fully Brick Models Bricklink —Brick Vice Bricklink Rebrickable —BrickusMaximus Bricklink —SonicSunday Rebrickable —Brickalive Rebrickable BlocK Shop —custombricks.de CUSTOMBRICKS Rebrickable —The Royal Church (by ateameric) Rebrickable —Alternative for Town Bridge (by Albertovax Corner) Bricklink —Bowling Alley (by drtyksh) ebay —Book Store (by Lair of Maedhros) Bricklink So that’s all I found. Maybe you wonder “why he’s asking for new instructions, he already found enough!” I ask it because I’m just purchasing/will just purchase the instructions in the categorie “must-have” . In LDD gallery, there are some interesting MOCs, you can download them too. I hope that list helps some people and some people helps me by recommending/finding more modular instructions/LDD files Cheers!
  20. Dufflefan

    [MOC] The Diamond Theatre

    Hi Everyone, I’ve been a member here for a while, but this is my first post. I thought I would share my first MOC modular building: The Diamond Theatre. I’ve always loved the modular buildings, and I started to create one when I discovered Lego Digital Designer a while back (this project has taken quite a few years!). I wanted to try to build something a little different, but which also kept the nature and character of the modular buildings, so I decided on three rules to try to follow. First, I’ve seen loads of amazing MOC modular buildings here on the forum with great colour schemes, but that skill level is rather beyond my capabilities, so I decided to try a building with a colour scheme similar to real life structures. I remember visiting Legoland (Billund) as a kid and seeing the London section, so I wanted my modular building to loosely replicate the Legoland large-scale “landmark” replica buildings. Second, I wanted to use a 48x48 baseplate as I felt it would provide more space and scope for details to capture the architectural features of a typical old London theatre; grandiose exteriors, cramped staff spaces, (very!) outdated toilets, and a dimensionally (vertically) imposing auditorium. Having a larger footprint also meant a better chance to avoid some of the building experience criticisms of some modular buildings (such as the first and second floors of the Grand Emporium being very similar/repetitive). Third, I wanted to find a way to include all the Lego themes I loved in my childhood. I came up with the idea of a “modular insert” section inside the modular building which could be used to recreate any past (or current!) Lego theme which interested any potential builder. In part, this led me towards building a theatre as the stage would be the ideal modular section to achieve this. I designed a classic castle stage set, a classic pirates stage set, and a stage where The Beatles are performing (as a nod to the Yellow Submarine set, although I understand this is artistic license given the live performance history of The Beatles!). Of course, other modular stage sets such as classic space, or perhaps a set replicating a famous real-life musical could also be designed as the “modular insert”. A sort of model-within-a-model. I really have no idea whether I made the most of these three ideas, but it was really fun to try (albeit completely digitally). I’ve put some captions about each of the images below, but any feedback would be appreciated. Thanks for looking, and thanks very much to all those who build, maintain, and develop Bricklink Studio – it’s a great free program and given this project started in the old Lego Digital Designer, I’m grateful I was able to continue it after support for Lego Digital Designer was ended. Anyway, enough talking!... (Please click for larger photos) THE COMPLETE BUILDING: The design is loosely based on London’s Piccadilly Theatre, which I focused on as I wanted to see if I could create a curved façade. I also used the building’s colours as a reference. Also, I tried to make the street furniture as “Londonesque” as possible – the bollards, signpost, postbox, and bicycle: THE GROUND FLOOR: The gap behind the stage area is for the “modular insert” section(s). I’m not experienced enough with Bricklink Studio to know how to show the inside details, so I simply hid some of the bricks and rendered the model again to show areas of the inside. Above is the ticket desk/booths, the stall to purchase programmes, entrance to the auditorium, and the stairs. Below is a close up of the ticket desk/booths. The above image is the dressing room and the rear access to the ticket desk/booths. Below is the view of the auditorium and the stage (with the rear wall “blank” installed, rather than a “modular insert” stage set). THE FIRST FLOOR: The first floor features a brick-built advertisement, the upper circle (though not really a "circle"!), box seats, the patron’s bar, toilet, catwalk/bridge, spotlight platform, some old promotional posters (a nod to the Palace Cinema), a chandelier (a nod to the Grand Emporium), and an award display. The above view shows the walkway, upper “circle”, spotlight platform, box seats, and patron’s bar. Below is a view of the catwalk/bridge from underneath also showing the stage lights. The above view is from the front just above the stairs on the ground floor showing the entrance to the upper "circle", the bar tables, and the award display. Below is the area in front of the bar showing the old promotional posters (the nod to the Palace Cinema). Another image below of the patron’s bar, this time from the side above the stairs, showing the position of the chandelier (a nod to the Grand Emporium) and the entrance to the box seats. The two below images show the details of the patron’s bar and the chandelier: Below is the old-fashioned toilet in the front corner of the first floor: THE ROOF: The access doors on the left in the above image don’t lead anywhere, it just seemed to be a feature on the rooves of a lot of older London buildings, so I included them as an additional detail to make the roof a little more interesting to look at and build. There is also space for a 2x6 counterweight brick to be added should it be required if I ever do build the model in real bricks. THE “MODULAR INSERTS”: The first image below shows the ground and first floors stacked together, the gap in the rear wall into which the “modular inserts” can be switched in and out, and some exposed detail of the catwalk/bridge of the first floor. The second image is of the very basic wall “blank” which can be installed to create an empty stage. Each of the modular inserts is built upon a 10x16 stud base. First is the classic pirates insert/stage: I also made a classic castle modular insert/stage (my apologies if I have a mix of shields here!): There is also a Beatles modular insert (a nod to the Yellow Submarine set). I took a little bit of artistic license here of course as obviously The Beatles hardly performed live in their later years, and I also had to swap George’s hair as I couldn’t find the 18858 part used in the Yellow Submarine set: Below is the detail of the piano. Again, there’s some artistic license here as this piano design is from more recent shows Paul has done, but I liked the art design on the piano, so I thought including it would make for a nice detail: THE MINIFIGURES: Below are the minifigures which I would include if this were a real set. The first image is of the theatre staff. Two ticket sales/bar managers and a stage technician: Next are the patrons (these aren’t chosen specifically for any reason): Then the actors from each of the sets; classic castle and classic pirates: And, of course, Ringo George, Paul, and John (sorry for the render not being the best): CUSTOM PRINTED PARTS: At first, I didn’t want to create a modular building which would need any custom parts – be it shape, colour, or printing. I planned this as I believed it would be best should I ever get the chance to actually make the building from real bricks. However, as I developed it, I thought some custom printed tiles would actually add a lot to the character of the whole project, so I changed my rule. I did however make sure I would only use tiles and only the known colours in which those tiles have been produced (I guess these could be stickers if needed, but I figured printings would be better). I used Adobe Illustrator and the Part Designer in Bricklink Studio to create the custom prints/tiles. Below is the complete set of custom printed tiles that would be required: Finally, an image of the whole building from above: I guess the only other things to mention are that all the bricks and parts are available in the colours used (with the only exceptions being the custom printed tiles mentioned above), and that all connections are “legal” Lego building techniques. All moving parts are completely functional, and I ran a stability check in Bricklink Studio which showed it was very solid. Excluding the minifigures, the total parts count is 5227. There are of course a few details which I’m sure better and more experienced builders could improve, and there are a few untidy areas here and there. Anyway, any comments would be much appreciated. Thanks!
  21. Loslyn

    (MOC/IDEAS) Galleria Barca

    GalleriaBarca01 by Loslyn Loslyn, on Flickr GalleriaBarca02 by Loslyn Loslyn, on Flickr https://ideas.lego.com/s/p:8f2904fdc2fc439bb500b7b7b4ad8928?s=m This is my Modular Building based on Gaudi's Casa Batllo. It's on IDEAS (please support it if you like it). Once it has had its time on IDEAS I will move the model to a 32 by 32 plate. I will then hopefully have space for a lift that mostly works rather than mostly being jammed! Does anyone have suggestions/recommendations for elevator mechanisms? Thanks
  22. Giacinto Consiglio

    [MOC] Fine Arts Shop & Newsagent's

    I'm very happy to introduce you my latest modular building, once again celebrating the joyful and elegant Art Nouveau Architecture. The buildings house a Fine Arts Shop and a Newsagent's on the ground floor, a therapist office on the first floor of the left building, a writer's messy room on the second floor, and the newsagent's apartment on the upper floor of the right building. I'm particularly satisfied by the right building, as I wanted to include some features from the renown Maison Saint Cyr by arch.Gustave Strauven in Bruxelles, as well as the very hard-to-find nougat colour, recently used in 1x10 plates as well as older 2x4 plates: these are the only "stackable" pieces in that colour. Hope you like it!
  23. Giacinto Consiglio

    [MOC] Corner Terrace

    Hi everybody! I'm happy to show you my fifteenth modular building, the Corner Terrace. Its architecture mainly draws inspiration from Mediterranean old towns and it's my first attempt at a 32x64 corner modular building, as well as an inverted corner solution. The first floors host a hardware shop and a wine shop; upstairs, a flat on two levels in the Sand Green building and a potter's lab in the white townhouse can be found. The terrace itself also offers a couple of tables to customers wishing to taste their wine enjoying a nice view of the city. The model uses 4826 pieces. Hope you like it!
  24. thenightman89

    [MOD] 123 Sesame Street Modular Building

    "Can you tell me how to get how to get to Sesame Street?" While the official 123 Sesame Street set (21324) is undoubtedly adorable, it does not easily fit into the Modular Building style. I challenged myself to convert the set into the Modular style using pieces almost entirely exclusive to the set. The only pieces that I needed to use in addition to the set's pieces were tiles for the sidewalk, two 1 x 2 brick with hole (in medium nougat), and a 16 x 32 baseplate. With the modifications, I think this design fits rather nicely alongside the official Modular Buildings! Anyone who may be interested in the instructions can find them here and on Rebrickable! Like all official Modular sets, I was able to design the building to be enclosed on all four sides. Additionally, the roof and second floor can be removed to view and access the interiors! The interiors contain many of the same memorable details from the official set (e.g. Ernie's iconic bathtub); however not all of the same details could be included since the official set's building is 6 studs wider. Below is a closer look at the front and back - since I limited myself to only using the pieces in the set, you can see the dark orange bricks from Hooper's Store needed to be used to provide a "weathered" look on the back. Now I can't wait to pick up the set and it this to my LEGO City!
  25. ReplicaOfLife

    [MOC] Bakery & Toy Store

    Hello everyone, this is my latest modular builing, the Bakery & Toy Store: Principal design in stud.io was done in 6-7 weeks & finished by the beginning of August. Then I spent another three weeks working out kinks, improving the build etc. Collecting the parts & ordering all the bones I was missing took another few weeks, and then I had about a month of fun building it (I took my time ) Basics: ~5500 pieces 4,1 kg 42cm high As usual, I just had some basic ideas when I started working on this. There were also two parts I wanted to use: - I was lucky to get a number of 4 x 4 plates in delicious sand-red relatively cheaply at the beginning of the year, so those had to go in! - and I got a few 32007 (Technic Tread Hub) from a bulk lot I purchased, and when I saw that piece, I immediately pictured it used on a facade somewhere Besides the bakery and toy shop, the building also houses Bennys Robot & Droid Repair Shop and a two-storey apartment First time I went for a brick-built lantern. The shelves are stacked in the toy store, including lots of Lego! And lots of delicious stuff can be had in the bakery. Now we enter Bennys Robot & Droid Repair Shop. Benny, being an honorary graduate of the Clarkson School of Engineering, wants to start work on this robot. His colleague would prefer a more delicate approach... The shop's security system is run from the desk. This is the first floor of the two-storey apartment. The staircase is built sideways (the one leading up to this floor aswell, but I failed to photograph that one properly ) The kitchen counter, looking rather unassuming, also features extensive SNOTting within. The top floor has the spacious living room with a huge, wall-mounted TV. Guitar & Amp and another book shelf provide entertainment when you're done with Brickflix. The guest bedroom doubles as a home gym. Size comparison to the town house from the Book Shop. It's not quite fair, but that was sort of the point . That being said, I don't think the Town House looks that out of place next to my modular, despite being so much smaller. As usual, there are more pictures on flickr for anyone who's interested. I appreciate any comments, praise or critique. Tobias