Lasse D

Eurobricks Fellows
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About Lasse D

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    Sallad thief!
  • Birthday 09/24/1984

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    <p> Jack Stone and 5580</p>

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    LasseD

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    Denmark
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    Building LEGO creations and programming.

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    Denmark
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  1. I am working on a new container lifting mechanism, similar to the one you saw in the red crane many years ago in this thread. For this I have updated the containers As can be seen above, the containers now have a floor. The floor also makes them more robust, and the cost in parts is negligible. In total each container has of 11 of the big 5x11 technic panels. The Icaras container is almost unchanged. By using jumper plates, the spacing of the lines on the sides is more realistic, and by using a row of tiles on the top and bottom, the exposed technic parts are kept at a minimum. The Lunar Industries container has had the *Industries" line removed and the letters have been updated. It is a much cleaner design now The OCP container now has the same colors on both sides and I have kept it in the dark colors There is a new container with a Weyland Yutani logo. We are building better worlds, after all Finally there are a couple without logos: As you can see, there is a common theme with fictional logos as decorations. Choosing logos is, however, not easy as the canvas is only 10 pixels tall. Do you have any good ideas for logos on the two plain containers? Once I have a functional lifting mechanism, I will see if I can make a fancy crane - this time one that does not drop containers from 1 meter of height!
  2. That's a really good looking 2000GT - the curves of the sports car are instantly recognisable. Now I say sports car, but it is arguably more of a GT car. In any case, it laid the groundwork for Toyota sports cars and has become a very important part of the heritage of the brand. This is an extremely rare sports car. I passed a couple of them last year as they were leaving Nordschhleife for the N24. They were joined by a pair of Mk 4 and a pair of Mk 5 Supras. The collaboration with Yamaha has been a great journey. It even included acoustic tuning of the first super car by Toyota, the Lexus LFA.
  3. This is a scale 1:20 (Legoland Miniland scale) BMW M8 GTE. I built this car for Le Mans in 2018 and brought it to the race for some pictures because, why not. The car was initially built from pictures and size information available before the big race. This is why it has a big ///M-logo on the roof. As always I have been using Griddy for the design and this was the setup I was using during the initial design: Stickers and updated pictures became available shortly before Le Mans and I had just enough time to remove the ///M logo and get stickers made before leaving for the race. There was no time for a nice picture of the car before leaving, but here it is right in front of the real deal: And we were also allowed out on the track itself on the Friday before the race. Here it is together with the other GTE PRO race cars next to the historical Dunlop bridge Now. The thread title says [WIP] instead of [MOC]. This is because I have only been spending 3 weeks on the car before it was brought to Le Mans in 2018. Now I want to improve it before making building instructions as has been done with most of the other cars (only the Vantage and M8 are currently not done). One of the details I want to improve is the front. The "hood" on the real car has a significant slope. In the LEGO model that should translate into a lowering of the headlights. In order to do this I have reduced the height of the lower assembly from 2 to 1 brick in height: I also want to see if it is possible to make a more realistic headlight design. Option 1 is this one with 1x1 plates with tooth in trans black, while another option could be what you see on the other side: I am personally partial toward the original headlight design as it looks more "BMW like", but I would love for others to give their input and nudge me in the right direction of this design which has been bothering me for... well 2 years now. Update on July 7, 2020 I have decided on continuing with a version that combines the trans black side as shown above with the original headlight design. This allows for the inside of the headlights to curve together, while the outside remains "BMW-like". Continuing with the sides. These are mostly carried over from the original design. The main changes here are the lower black trim pieces and the sides being pushed half a plate outward. The height is a massive change, as can be seen by placing the two cars with their noses next to one another One of my main challenges with the front is to get the fenders right. I might add 1x6 tiles over the wheels to recreate the sloping hood of the real car. The center of the hood also needs a complete overhaul with the angular ///M lines while maintaining the aero elements. The next update will most likely first be in 2 weeks, but any suggestions are as always welcome.
  4. I have downloaded it recently and tried to make it work on MacOS. However. It seems like it doesn't work anymore. I get the following error: *** Terminating app due to uncaught exception 'OC_PythonException', reason: '<class 'AssertionError'>: Unknown device with id 66 being attached (port 70' *** First throw call stack: ( 0 CoreFoundation 0x00007fff3cf59acd __exceptionPreprocess + 256 1 libobjc.A.dylib 0x00007fff6765da17 objc_exception_throw + 48 2 CoreFoundation 0x00007fff3cf73629 -[NSException raise] + 9 3 _objc.cpython-38-darwin.so 0x000000010e3988fe PyObjCErr_ToObjCWithGILState + 46 4 _objc.cpython-38-darwin.so 0x000000010e390c64 -[OC_PythonObject forwardInvocation:] + 708 5 CoreFoundation 0x00007fff3cefb67e ___forwarding___ + 780 6 CoreFoundation 0x00007fff3cefb2e8 _CF_forwarding_prep_0 + 120 7 CoreBluetooth 0x00007fff3c9d7ed4 -[CBPeripheral handleAttributeEvent:args:attributeSelector:delegateSelector:delegateFlag:] + 239 8 CoreBluetooth 0x00007fff3c9d800e -[CBPeripheral handleCharacteristicEvent:characteristicSelector:delegateSelector:delegateFlag:] + 115 9 CoreBluetooth 0x00007fff3c9d3a7e -[CBPeripheral handleMsg:args:] + 297 10 CoreBluetooth 0x00007fff3c9ce368 -[CBCentralManager handleMsg:args:] + 198 11 CoreBluetooth 0x00007fff3c9c97db __30-[CBXpcConnection _handleMsg:]_block_invoke + 53 12 libdispatch.dylib 0x00007fff68dde5f8 _dispatch_call_block_and_release + 12 13 libdispatch.dylib 0x00007fff68ddf63d _dispatch_client_callout + 8 14 libdispatch.dylib 0x00007fff68de58e0 _dispatch_lane_serial_drain + 602 15 libdispatch.dylib 0x00007fff68de63c6 _dispatch_lane_invoke + 433 16 libdispatch.dylib 0x00007fff68de5792 _dispatch_lane_serial_drain + 268 17 libdispatch.dylib 0x00007fff68de6396 _dispatch_lane_invoke + 385 18 libdispatch.dylib 0x00007fff68dee6ed _dispatch_workloop_worker_thread + 598 19 libsystem_pthread.dylib 0x00007fff6901f611 _pthread_wqthread + 421 20 libsystem_pthread.dylib 0x00007fff6901f3fd start_wqthread + 13 ) libc++abi.dylib: terminating with uncaught exception of type NSException Abort trap: 6 And the versions of software are: bleak 0.6.4 bricknil 0.9.3 curio 1.2
  5. I had a similar issue, and had also been away for a year, and I simply created a new account. Controllers at SBrick are fairly simple, so I don't mind making them from scratch.
  6. Lasse D

    [MOC] [EBFS] [MMM] Theme Park Fountain

    Thanks. I'm glad that you like it. The fountain, however, seems to have stolen the show. It has received 3 times as many replies as when I presented the bouncy castle!
  7. Thanks you. I'm glad that you like it. I have finally finished the building instructions for the trailer: https://brickhub.org/i/607 In the video I show how the trailer compares to the 12 years old one, and how they both interact with the SBrick-controlled truck. It is clear that the new mechanism is both a lot quicker and easier to use than the old motorised one. I also show hot to change the battery (another operation which has been made much easier) and how the rear lift gate operates. The reason it tool me so long to create building instructions was a combination of me learning to use LDCad, and the fact that this trailer is quite unconventional in its construction. This is the progress after 2 evenings of work: And then again each of the next 4 days: In order to prepare for these instructions I have updated buildinginstructions.js to detect when LDCad creates generated parts so that they show as parts (and not as models due to the .ldr suffix). Also. The website brickhub.org now shows the glow-in-the-dark parts as glowing when you turn the light down: So all in all the instructions ended up being a 14 day project. On the positive side, all building instructions created in LDCad should from now on show correctly on the website, and if you create something with glow-in-the-dark elements, then they should also work. Who would be interested in a new US style truck for the next model team model?
  8. That would be awesome, as I do not recall who told me the story of the price. It was most likely during one of those tours in Billund from way before LEGO House. The comment regarding nationality was because you shouted (used many exclamation marks) in your initial response where you mentioned Hungary. Intend doesn't translate into text. I had not brought up any points regarding nations or legal points, so I just wanted to make it clear that I don't have any ill thoughts about anyone because of their nationality.
  9. Lasse D

    Scale Modeling General Discussion

    Is this forum still moderated, or have the rules changed?
  10. How come you didn't quote the price of the micromotor, you know, the only motor I was specifically referring to? My comment was not an attack on your national identity. It was insights into the problems that LEGO was faced with back in the days where they nearly went bankrupt. Notice also how I said it was one of the issues - not THE single issue. Big companies rarely fail due to a single problem. And if you want to point out the leading problem, then I would claim it was the juniorization of the product line which drove customers away. However. That can only be a claim on my side - I do not have any insights to back up that this is the leading issue, only that it appears to be the worst.
  11. Lasse D

    Eurobricks Flower Show: The Showground

    Theme Park Fountain
  12. My entry to the Eurobricks Flower Show is this fountain from the classic 1995* PlayStation game "Theme Park": The fountain has moving elements as shown in this short video (1 minute): In order to stay true to the original design, I have limited the amount of flowers to a little handful of water-lilys. Apart from the blue water and moving elements, the model consists of a lot of SNOT, such as in how the smaller lower basin is constructed. I have tried many different construction techniques for the falling water between the basins, including Bionicle claws and various designs with cones. The solution with lightsabre blades seems to work the best. You can see the construction techniques in detail in the building instructions here: https://brickhub.org/i/604 Alright. So [MOC] and [EBFS] makes sense, but what is [MMM]? you might ask. Well. Right now it is not much. I have tried to create a new standard for showing moving minifigs in City layouts since 2016. Until now the modules I have made have been a complete failure, but it finally seems like I have found something that resembles a usable standard. Here is a short introduction: MMM stands for "Moving Minifig Machine". MMM consists of modules, such as this basic straight one: Or this corner module: The fountain is an "MMM Gadget" which fits into the "gadget slot" of the standard modules: There are two gadget slots in the straight module, but only the left one has the power take-off for the fountain: I think it will all make more sense when seeing how it all works together in this video: *Originally released for DOS in 1994, but I only have the PlayStation version from 1995, so that is where the graphics are from.
  13. Allow me to finally introduce a project that has been a source of many sleepless nights, frighteningly advanced hair loss, and multiple failures since 2016: Moving Minifig Machine Like GBC, "MMM" consists of modules. The module in this thread is a Mindstorms-powered fun fair ride where the minifigs move in, jump, and then leave. See the short introduction here: The idea was born at a LEGO event. The audience always loves GBC, but most builders prefer to build city layouts. MMM is an attempt at combining the movement from GBC with minifig-scaled buildings. Modules are based on raised base plates. This allows for the conveyors and mechanical components (such as a Mindstorms NXT as seen in this module). The front wall allows the builder to showcase the name of the module. It can also be left blank as seen in the adjacent modules, or you can tape printouts onto them with some interesting information of the modules. See building instructions for standard modules here: https://brickhub.org/i/themes.php?theme=MMM The design of this module is based on the classic game Theme Park by Bullfrog which was released in 1994. The "graphics" of the modules I have built are form the 1995 port to the Playstation. This screenshot is from the DOS version: You can see a very fancy version of the in-game model in the cut scene at 8:17 of this video: The module uses a single L-motor for the two tracks. It uses a mechanical "diode" to make the outer track go in a single direction, while the other can change direction. I show it in detail in this update: An NXT motor is used to raise and lower the jumping pillow, while the walls move in and out. Finally, an M-motor is hidden in the "pillow" to move the tracks on it that connect with the outer track at an angle which allows for entry and exit that works fairly reliably. You can see me testing it in this video: I have tried a variety of designs for the pillow which would allow it to be built in red. Designs include rolling cylinders and free-spinning wheels. All of these attempts failed horribly, and I decided on compromising with a gray pillow. I know it is not much, but I hope that you can see the idea behind this. The project might fail - it has done so many times - but I also think it has potential. I have more modules planned and hope that you will enjoy the presentation of them. And if you think that I'm exaggerating when I say 2016, I must begrudgingly say that it is true. Here is an unlisted video of the layout as it were in 2016. The modules have since then been redesigned:
  14. Yeah. You probably have a small fortune on your hands there since these are made on official equipment and with LEGO logos. Fun fact about the micromotor. These were unbelievably expensive to produce. The micromotor did in some sets cost LEGO more to produce than what the set was sold for! Mismanagement of funds like this was one of the reasons for the financial troubles in the late '90s and early '00s. Even the Technic space shuttle was sold at a loss! LEGO has since then introduced strict control of production cost for all of their parts, and the price of some parts even vary based on color.
  15. Here is the latest version of the Renault Magnum. It is nearly identical to the previous one, but instead of the expensive PFx components it has a normal Power Functions receiver and a pair of lights: Building instructions for the new Magnum with Power Functions can be found here: https://brickhub.org/i/596 The truck and trailer in full: The main change from the previous Renault Magnum is up top where the Power Functions receiver peeks out: And the roof can be opened to grand access: Other changes include the design of the headlights to accommodate the Power Functions lights: and for the building instructions the full coloring of the truck changes with your selection. I show a couple of alternate colors in the video. As for the trailer, it is now complete in the first "prototype" version. As seen in the video, the legs and decoupler work extremely well, and you can also see the Glow In Dark effect as highlighted previously. It seems to not be suffering from the whole floor being upside down. The main work will be done on the rear opening and lift mechanism: The top opens, but doesn't close completely - this is one of the things I want to fix. The lift can go up and down, but I would like the closing mechanism to work better so that the cheese slope is not necessary for guiding it closed. Here the two Coke trailers can be seen together for comparison: I expect the next update will be with an improved trailer. But I would also like to make a proper truck for it.