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  1. (note; this is going to be a very long post, with many pictures and lots of reading. I enjoy those kind of posts by others, so when I post myself, I try to do likewise…) Let me spin you a yarn of fellow-rovers A tale of briny yearnings on a grey Monday morning, and of building a Legoset known as the 3in1 pirates set 31109. So get a drink and get a snack. Sit back, this is going to be a long one… And while you’re at it, could you spend this old sailor a ration of rum too? Good boy… This is the tale of… the briney brick 48: All Hands... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr I have not always been this salty dog you see before you now. Once I lived in a tread mill. Rising each day at dawn, sipping tepid tea while reading a news paper, pushed papers at an office, and going home for a meager meal and sleep. Day after weary day. Spilling tea from cup into saucer was the about the biggest adventure that could happen. Than one grey day, while reading the same bugger and bore as always in the papers, and sipping my tepid morning tea, it hit me; The briney brick... (1) by Jan Kusters, on Flickr (The heyday of my Lego origins was way back in the sixties, when Lego wheels were new. It means modern Lego can easily baffle me with things that go together one way, but not another way. While messing with Classic Space, I learned that bricklinking lose bricks was a certain road to trouble. Brilliant ideas turned out to be impossible once I received certain bricks. And at the same time, often solutions – when found – turned out much easier than expected. Classic Space taught me a valuable lesson. For modern Lego; start with one or more sets to learn the tricks, and to get a bunch of Lego that works well together. So when I decided to go into Lego sailing, I decided to buy a set. In fact, I had already done that, but that was still old Lego; set 398, the Constellation, was from 1978, and was mostly build from the kind of bricks I knew.) 0147 b afd 27-4-2018 em5 2578 by Jan Kusters, on Flickr It was a beautiful ship, very much along the lines of what I build as a kid, but better. And once I build it, I loved modifying it to give it a better rigging. (see https://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?/forums/topic/173194-uss-constellation-set-39810021-and-some-mods/&tab=comments for more on that build). It also taught me that I find it hard to build a set without at least some modifying. I tend to have my own ideas, even when guided… But this set was still too old, nothing like the classic Pirate ships that came out during my dark ages. I had turned my gaze towards Lego Pirates at a perfect moment; by the time I decided I really wanted to build such a boat, Lego came out with two fantastic new sets; Pirates of Barracuda Bay (set nr. 21322) and the Pirates 3in1 Creator set (nr. 31109). I loved them both! With Corona hitting the world and sending us all into more or less of a lock down, I found myself spending less money on going out and travel. I had time, I had some money, lets get them sets! I stashed away my 'old school' bricks, and my Classic Space bricks, bought 4 small drawer cabinets, ordered the sets for my birthday, and started… Entr'acte: work station finaly ready for action... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Modern sets, in modern drawers... Set 31109, the 3in1 Pirate set from 2020, and the 21322 Pirates of Barracuda Bay set. I did not start with building those set right away. I was determined to make the most of it, and spread the fun over a long time. So I opened up the sets and sorted all the bricks into the drawers (and one large box for the bigger pieces). The plan was (and still is) to slowly work my way up to building the ships, wrapped in a story that slowly unfolds itself on my display shelf. I would modify where I so fit, and bricklink parts I needed, but with these two sets, I had a solid collection of modern Lego that would get me a long way. It was time to send Minifigme on an adventure… The Briney Brick... (2) by Jan Kusters, on Flickr With little money and even less experience, Minifigme did not quite start his nautical adventures as he had pictured it. No big boat and happy crew singing merry sea shanties. No one would hire an old inexperienced geezer as crew. And a small boat was all he could afford. A very small boat! Small, but good enough to learn the ropes. And the friendly second hand ships sales man threw in even a sea chest for provisions. As kind of a life boat to go with his ship… Last year, I had bought the 3in1 Deep Sea Creatures set 31088 and liked that a lot (I bought even two of them). Fish! by Jan Kusters, on Flickr I found many alternate builds for this set online. More than enough to give Minifigme all the adventures he dreamed of when cooped up behind his desk. A small boat is more than enough for adventure! Minifigme soon learned the sea is a big adventure alright. The Briney Brick... (3) by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Not two glasses out at sea, treetops and high rise hotels sank behind the horizon, and Minifigme came under attack of a giant prawn! Fighting for his life and provisions, he came out victorious, but with new respect for the sea and what lies beneath. The Briney Brick... (4) by Jan Kusters, on Flickr An antennae, knocked from the giant prawn, made for an excellent fishing rod, nice to add to his provisions. Although the first catch was not very inviting to eat. Raw swordfish, anyone? The sword might come in handy though... The Briney Brick 6 (a) Sea life... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Not everything in the sea turned out to be monsters and trouble. Minifigme’s first whale sighting was cute enough… The Briney Brick 6 (b) and more sea life by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Until mommy dear showed up in a protective mood. The big whale was a known Lego alternate build with instructions online. The baby whale came from a Youtube channel (https://youtu.be/kWajNobR2Uo). The Giant Prawn is based on something I saw online, but build in my own way. Then one fine day, Mini-me spotted a lonely little island. Land Ho and all that! The Briney Brick 8 (a) Land Ho! by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Greetings from... Uhm.. Err... The Briney Brick 8 (b) Land Ho! by Jan Kusters, on Flickr There was a lot of driftwood on that Island, and Minifigme started to expend his little boat. Life on a deserted Island, with fish, coconuts and driftwood, what more could one want? Some proper tools perhaps. Of course the ocean is big and empty, but once you find a sweet spot, you’re bound to get company. And so one morning, Minifigme woke up to the sight of this… The Briney Brick 9 (a): PIRATES! by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Pirates! The Briney Brick 9 (b): PIRATES! by Jan Kusters, on Flickr A whole bunch of one legged Pirates – and one rather weathered looking castaway – had invaded his little island! (here's where I started modding stuff. Just little bits. After all, them pirates had been on their raft a long time, and they were pirates, not fishermen...) After the first shock, they turned out to be quite a friendly bunch. And once Minifigme was willing to share the driftwood and the fish he caught with them, they soon became best of friends. The Pirates were not lazy and pretty handy with a lot of things. They quickly started to make the island a lot more inhabitable. The Briney Brick 10 (a) by Jan Kusters, on Flickr The Briney Brick 10 (c) by Jan Kusters, on Flickr The Briney Brick 11 (a): Done... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr And so life became pretty easy going on their little tropical paradise... The Briney Brick 11 (d): Done... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr The Briney Brick 12 (a): by Jan Kusters, on Flickr The Briney Brick 12 (b): by Jan Kusters, on Flickr The Briney Brick 13 (b): going native... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Minifigme has even gone native by cutting the sleeves from his shirt and by getting some ink done. Now this was all nice and dandy, but I have to admit, once everything was done, them pirates and Minifigme turned rather lazy and boring, almost like a bunch of Pensionados lazing about on a tropical island. Luckily one day Pip, the youngest mate, noticed a something in the sand, when the quartermaster removed some shrubbery. The Briney Brick 23 (a): X never EVER marks the spot... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr X never EVER marks the spot! Except when it does of course. The Briney Brick 23 (b): X never EVER marks the spot... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr There are not many things that get Pirates fired up like a hint of some hidden treasure, so they burst into activity right away. The Briney Brick 23 (c): X never EVER marks the spot... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr The resulting dig did not bring the expected loot, but it did point into a direction that Pirates can never resist. Skeletons? Maps? Thaddaway? There must be booty beyond that horizon! CAST OFF FORE AND AFT! MAKE SAIL! The Briney Brick 24: The fleet sets sail... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr And so a small armada packed up, cast off and set sail. Each in or on his own craft… And then, one foggy morning: The Briney Brick 30 a: as the fog slowly clears... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr 'Driftwood ahead! Lots of driftwood! Oh, uhm, and some sharp pointy rocks too, by the way…' As the morning fog cleared, it turned out to be more than just driftwood. The Briney Brick 30 b: as the fog slowly clears... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr And thus our intrepid crew came across a ship, wrecked on a small rocky island. After a careful check and some deliberations, It was decided to try and fix the ship up again. The Briney Brick 31 c: Them poor sods... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr With the wreck came 3 new crewmen. Good honest traders by their own admission, but willing to join the Pirates if that would get them off the rocks. Meet the brothers Port and Starboard, and Big All. The Briney Brick 34 b: Heave Ho mates! by Jan Kusters, on Flickr The ship’s hold turned out to be a treasure trove of tools, paint and other useful stuff. The Briney Brick 33 c: What do we have here? by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Deep down in the hold of the wreck, the quartermaster even found a couple of canon barrels, perhaps used as ballast, or else for sale. Apart from the wreck itself, these were the best finds! The Briney Brick 34 c: Heave Ho mates! by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Heave ho! Lining up parts of the hull and pulling her together again. The Briney Brick 35: Men at work 1 by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Remind me Port, how was it again? Measure once, cut twice? The Briney Brick 37: Men at work (4) by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Heave Ho again! Moving wood. Moving so much wood! With all the rafts taken apart, and shortening the ship a few feet, there was more than enough wood to rebuild her. The Briney Brick 37: Men at work (3) by Jan Kusters, on Flickr The ship had no gun ports, it had indeed been a harmless merchant. With the canons found in the hold however, it could become so much more. If only some gun ports could be cut… Modding time: I added a deck. Simple; the original open deck had an 8x10 stud hole, so a 8x8 grill plate with 2 2x8 plates on the sides would fill it nicely. Entr'acte: the ship from set 31109, and some small modifications. by Jan Kusters, on Flickr The briney brick 43: heave ho once more by Jan Kusters, on Flickr I also added a capstan to the centre of the grill plate, so my poor crew no longer had to dangle like a bunch of grapes from a rope to haul something. It also makes it easier to take out that deck part and reach the guns below. The Briney Brick 40: The downside of good ideas... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr The only downside to the added deck is more deck to swab. Pip had been pretty impressed by the figure head. Of course it had lost some of its charm, with a lot of wood weathered and silvering. Time for a touch up! The Briney Brick 33 a: What do we have here? by Jan Kusters, on Flickr The Briney Brick 39: a ship taking shape 2 by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Intermezzo 2: adjusting the Ginger Mermaid... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr (more slight modding; from left to right from original to what is now the figure head (number 4) and one beyond) The Briney Brick 39: a ship taking shape 1 by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Quartermaster in a bosun’s chair, giving the captain’s quarters on the original just brow ship a lick of fresh paint. (thus restoring the wreck to original 31109 colours). And more modding time. The Briney Brick 42 (c): Adding a closed forcastle by Jan Kusters, on Flickr I wanted to close up the front of the fore castle. That in itself was easy enough, although it took me a time to decide on windows or a door to access the galleon. And I wanted to change the bow sprit a bit… The Briney Brick 42 (a): Adding a closed forecastle by Jan Kusters, on Flickr A wall in the fore castle was simple enough, and much to my delight, the shutters in the arched windows can swing out like this! Who knew! I had spend weeks agonising over windows or door in that wall... Entr'acte: the ship from set 31109, and some small modifications. by Jan Kusters, on Flickr I also altered the Capstan on the fore deck a little. Set directly on the 1 layer higher frond deck. Stud shooters with a 1x1 round brick instead of a plate make excellent swivel guns... And if closed studs are used, they will even shoot that brick... The Briney Brick 42 (b): Adding a closed forcastle by Jan Kusters, on Flickr The forecastle is now Baldies domain, the galley. With a good stack of rum of course. Most of my mods to the ship are based on a replica 17th century ship, de Halve Maen (the Half Moon in old Dutch). It is a replica of a Dutch small(ish) seagoing ship. The original was from 1609, a sailing replica was build in 1989 in Albany, New York. That replica spend some years in the Netherlands, which gave me a chance to visit it. In my view the lines of the ship from set 31109, with its high fore castle and high stern, remind me of a late 16th or early 17th century ship. So it might be something like this, a fast ‘Yacht’, or a small galleon with a smallish crew. Staysails and the gaff-mizzen are from later date, when ships also became less ‘curved’. The only things really missing from the 31109 set are lateen sails on the mizzen and a Bonaventura masts at the back. I could not figure an easy way to fit them (the masts of the Lego set are actually too far back) and they would make the cabin at the back less accessible (the entire poop deck flips up). I could, however, add a bowsprit-mast with square sails instead of stay sails. The gaffed mizzen stays furled up on my ship. Most fore- and aft sails on these ships were more for steering and balancing the ship on course than for going faster. The full ship... Galley in the fore castle... The briney brick 44: Raising the masts by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Raising the masts… For now I would like to keep this ship pretty much as brick build as I can. I am curious about how it compares to the 'specialize parts' ship from Barracuda Bay. For that reason I am also using the Technic-part build masts, although I think the one piece masts like the Barracuda Bay has looks better (and I can find those even in brown). Entr'acte: the ship from set 31109, and some small modifications. by Jan Kusters, on Flickr I did change the masts a bit with bricklinked parts. I made them ‘stepped’ like real masts would be, and I replaced a bunch of grey ‘washers’ with brown half tubes. Entr'acte: the ship from set 31109, and some small modifications. by Jan Kusters, on Flickr I also changed the way the sails are attached a bit, they are now all on pins with a ball, and a ball cup at the spar, so I can move them about more easily. So far the rigging is my only real departure from the 'brick build' style. The rubbery string rigging from set 31109 looks fine, and fits better than what I am using now, but I like how I can pose minifings in the old style one piece rigging. It is also easier to partly disassemble things quick for posing figures or taking pictures… It is possible that, at some point in the future, I might decide to do my own rigging in real rope, and sails in paper or cloth. That is what I did ad a kid; I would build a (rather rudimentary) ship in Lego (not much else was possible in the sixties) with wooden dowel masts and spars, and spend days on making a rigging from darning wool and cutting sails from old handkerchiefs mom would give me after enough begging. But that would only be once I decide to change the ship into display instead of active play use. Which might be a while or never… The briney brick 47 (a): launch day... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Finally it was time to launch the rebuild ship. With the new shiny figure head, the ship practically named itself. ‘The Crimson Mermaid’, what else could it be? The briney brick 47 (d): launch day... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr The launch party would have been even better had one man remained on board to drop the anchor. As it was, after the launch there was a mad scramble and swim to get the ship before she drifted off. Luckily Monty (the weathered looking castaway) had made friends with a shark, and that proved handy to catch up with the drifting ship… the briney brick 49; Pip at the steering wheel... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Another small mod, and very much not historically accurate for a ship this age; a compass binnacle with steering wheel and compass light. An actual ship this age would have been steered with a whipstaff or even a tiller below deck, and commands shouted down to the helmsman. But I have a bright crew who comes up with great inventions… And I have a steering wheel… I have even added a working compass-brick I found on Bricklink. Final modding: I did make some changes and extra’s in sails. For all sails I added spars with furled up sails, to use when the ship is anchored. For sailing conditions I added one fully deployed large sail, to be used on the foremast or mainmast, and I added a spritsail (on the bow sprit) and an furled up upper spritsail instead of the stay sail of the original set. The mizzen sail is also usually kept furled up. And so here she finally is, in all her sailing glory... The Briney Brick 54: dead calm... by Jan Kusters, on Flickr Entr'acte: the ship from set 31109, and some small modifications. by Jan Kusters, on Flickr The Crimson Mermaid!
  2. Ahoy there, and welcome to Jose's Inn, located on the scenic Skull Rock boardwalk just a stone throws away from the pirate port itself! This Inn has all amenities of (both ship-or-land-based) home, such as five cozy beds and a large wine cellar stocked with all best ale's, beers, wines and spirits. The food served is guaranteed by our cook Dan "Dysentery" McGee to be the best served in all the world's navies, with no-maggots* crackers a staple of the pre-dinner meal! We are also proud to feature twice-a-week amusements by "Davy Jones and the Cursed Immortals" as our house band on Monday and Friday nights. Come around for such hearty songs such as "Point of Know Return", "Wooden Ships", "Octopus's Garden", with "Hotel in Tortuga" as their usual closer. The rear of the tavern, with the crow's nest-like lookout on top. Inside and upstairs are the (cost is per night) beds. Downstairs is the tavern area. So come on down to Jose's Inn, where our famous waitstaff (Manfred the waiter on left, Rosemary the barkeep on right) will treat you like old friends! (*Crackers may or may not contain maggots. Resulting disease may vary; Check with your local barber for more details on whether the crackers may be safe for you!) Davy Jones and the Undead Immortals Band are, from left to right: - Cpt. Vanderdecken, on drums (cursed God on a trip round the horn of Africa, so God cursed him) - Corporal Punishment, on guitar (from a Spanish expedition to El Dorado) - Major Paine, on bass guitar (officer from the English Civil War) - Davy Jones, on vocals (made a deal with goddess Calypso to ferry souls to underworld) NOTE: Their instruments are made from ectoplasm and not visible to living beings, thus they are not visible here. MODEL NOTES: This tavern idea came to me in early February, and was built in late May, and is based off set 31109's B-model with the printed sign from set Pirates of Barracuda Bay (from the Ideas set 21332 number . I thought I should build accommodations for my pirate crews upon arriving at Skull Rock, and it will hook into the boardwalk via clips on both sides of the model's dock easily. The song list is the one I thought long and hard about... thinking of REAL songs with pirate or ship themes, however slight, was hard! However, the easiest one to add was because of @Professor Thaum and his awesome pirate-y rendition of Hotel California, as seen in the post linked to above in the actual song list and again here, because I love it so much. Comments, questions, suggestions, and complaints welcome!
  3. This topic has a lot of photos inside, to make it easier for everyone to see the latest version of my MOD, I have editted this first post to show version 5, 14th Nov 2020. Your feedback is welcome or share your MOD ideas Please! Port View by R Y, on Flickr Bow by R Y, on Flickr Stern Starboard by R Y, on Flickr My Lego collection consisted mainly of SW sets and its MOCs, I was tempted to get the 21322 Barracuda Bay when it came out in April but decided to save up for the UCS A-Wing, which I still haven’t got around to build yet, I have been modify the 75175 A-wing. A-Wing Mod by R Y, on Flickr I wasn’t too keen on the 31109 Creator Pirate Ship when I first saw its photos, especially the brick-built sails. During the Queen’s Birthday long weekend, I was reading posts on OZLUG of buying multiple sets to make it a bigger ship; that grabbed my attention as I mod all Lego sets where possible after I figured out Bricklink. However, at RRP of $160 AUD each, I might as well just buy the 21322 for $300 AUD; then again thanks to OZLUG, I realised that they are $119 at Kmart, meaning $238 worth of investment, no brainer! I quickly read up on reviews from Brickset and Brother’s Brick, how the completely brick-built design is its selling point, instead of using specialized boat hull pieces. My local Kmart had no stock, so I went to the next nearest one, nothing on the shelves again and a store girl told me all they have is already on the shelfs even though the online stock check shows limited availability. Disappointed, I was about the leave the store empty handed before I talked past the customer service counter, there was only one person in line so I decided to wait and check. The service girl was very helpful and checked the stock room for me, it turned out they do have three at the back, which I gladly picked up two; she told me apparently people try to steal Lego all the time, so they keep the good stuff at the back. I had to wait for my baby to settle and sleep before started building that night. As the original model is built in 3 sections: bow with forecastle, waist, stern with captain’s cabin; I decided to build 2 x waists sections and have 3 masts. I always build repetition sections step by step simultaneously instead of finishing one section and start another, personally I find this method quicker. My aim is to stick to the original Lego design and finish the hull asap, redesign the masts into foremast, mainmast and mizzen mast, and use the remaining pieces to touch up and make the 2 waists transition smoothly. 31109 Long Side View by R Y, on Flickr I wanted to rig the ship from the bowsprit to the stern flagpole, I had to move the “Plate Round 2 x 2 with Pin Hole and 4 Arms Up” to the mainmast beneath the lookout so the arms are equal distance to the diagonal spars from the foremast and mizzen mast. I spent more time on the foremast and rigging than any other sections. I tried a few different arrangements before settled down on the current layout, where the rigging goes down to the bowsprit from the upside-down diagonal spar. I used light bluish grey Technic Bush instead of the yellow ones provided. The hose piece is still slightly short and the bowsprit is pulled upwards, but the jib sail hides most of it. Overall, I was happy that I achieved my goal. Masts and Rigging by R Y, on Flickr I added a 1 x 2 red brown plate to each of the gun port openings so they are not too close to the waterline, I initially wanted to add 2 pieces per opening, but they were too high and affected the guns inside. You can tell where each of the section ends with the breaks from the 3027 6 x 16 plate in dark tan secured with 2 x 2 blue round tiles. I made sure the 1 x 4 special plates overlap the gap to secure the sections. The alternating red and light orange strip along the deck worked out perfectly, I was initially worried that I may get a double up of same coloured plates with my MOD. Joins of the Sections by R Y, on Flickr As Lego only gives half the number of guns compare to the gun ports, having 2 sets gives me 4 guns to fill up the front gun deck, squeezed 2 minifigs inside with torches. Gun Deck with Baboon by R Y, on Flickr I plated over the opening next to the gangways on the 2nd waist, to make it look like a quarterdeck, but not really raised due to the limitation of my skills in the mod. I really like the brick-built rowing boat from the alternative Skull Island bult, I made it longer using 2 x 2 slopes at the stern and made other changes as certain parts were already used in the main ship built. I also built a boat rack with 4 cheese slopes and some plates. The rowing boat fills up on the empty quarterdeck perfectly, I really like how it turned out. Rowing Boat by R Y, on Flickr With the 2 sets of 3 human minifigs, I swapped around their outfits, brought in a pair of black legs to swap out the peg leg. Now I have 6 different minifigs, I left out the epaulette for the officer to differentiate him from the captain. a9 by R Y, on Flickr a8 by R Y, on Flickr I built the red/green parrot and blue seagull according to the instructions, again had to use some different pieces due to availability. Lastly, I added the pet baboon hanging off the shroud, it’s a really fun build where its arms and waist are twistable to get a good pose. Baboon by R Y, on Flickr I really liked how this MOD turned out, this is probably the cheapest and easiest way to get a Lego 8-gun full-rigged-ship (three or more masts), even the 21322 only has only two masts. It’s around 58cm long from the tip of the bowsprit to the edge of stern flag, around 36cm tall from the tip of mainmast to the bottom of the hull, 19cm wide at the horizontal spars. With the elongated waist, it makes the forecastle and poop deck seem small in comparison, a bit out of proportion to be honest; but at this stage, I don’t have the skills to design and make them bigger. Side Front View by R Y, on Flickr Top Front View by R Y, on Flickr Back View by R Y, on Flickr
  4. Captained by a Welsh fellow named Henry Smithfield, this ship, the "Yago", originally operated out of what became one of the Southern-most English Colonies. The mission was as a privateer to harass any Spanish ships coming from the Caribbean to the old world with gold and silver, (plus harass and steal from the French), for around five years, starting in 1705. But eventually, Cpt. Henry grew tired of paying his due of treasure to the English crown, and set off to make his own way in the world "free" of any government. He moved his base of operations to a small abandoned island in the Caribbean with his crew, used by Islanders from years prior. He got his crew to complete a fort, and used it as his base of operations. He plundered many a French, Spanish, and other nations' ships, along with his former comrades in the English navy. In early summer 1717 the Yago was last seen by some trappers on land (near what later became the port of Savannah, Georgia) sailing low in the water, going north, unknowingly into the path of a massive hurricane. The resulting wreck has never been found, and it was rumored to have been loaded to the gun-ports with gold and silver taken from a Spanish treasure ship by Florida's southern coast. (which had been found, incidentally, empty of most of it's treasure in the 1960's.) This could explain the heavily laden shape of the Yago that day in June 1717. As to what happened to the ship after it left the later-day Savannah area is anyone's guess, as it seems to have vanished without a trace off the face of the Earth. In reality, this ship's shape is inspired by set 21332, (Ideas' "Pirates of Barracuda Bay") but with the brick-built sails of set 31109. (Creator "Pirate Ship") The ship features the Ninjago pirate's flag as I don't have a way to make my own. (I don't want to change it anyway, as it reminds me of being inspired to build my original pirate ship by the Skybound sub-theme of Ninjago.) The stern of the ship, features the ship's wheel and flagpole for the ship's flag along with the ship's name, "Yago". The green feathers of my parent's talkative pet bird, Yago, (actually a Nanday Conure we rescued 11 years ago) inspired me to name the ship after him. I also tried to think of a bird shaped figure-head for the bowsprit, but failed to think of a good way of doing him justice. The ship is devoid of any major below-deck features, except for the eight firing cannons. The only place there is any real furniture is the captain's cabin and that consists of a table and rotating chair. The table features a nautical chart, wine glass, and a set of scales for divvying out loot to the crew / ship's purse. (for repairs and "edibles" stocks) Captain Henry Smithfield (in green) and his crew. (he has his old sword here. Need to update this picture!) Here is the Nanday conure my pirate ship is named after. You guys can also build you're own version of "The Yago" and the dock now that the LDD file is available here at my Bricksafe page. NOTE: six parts are missing from the file: Two of this 1 x 2 rounded-edge plate in black, for the rudder. Four of this black part 1x1 bracket, near the bow. There are some pieces placed next to the ship, which are for the rudder, above the amidships ladder on the sides, and for the bowsprit area. UPDATE: The ship is finished, with new pictures and text detailing the ship's history... what do you think of it? Any and all comments, questions, suggestions, and complaints are welcome!
  5. The light house of Skull Rock was once kept lit by a order of monks, who believed the nearby skull-shaped cliff face (carved by the former native islander inhabitants) was a sign from "The Man Upstairs" that is was an evil place. The monks were later killed off in 1708 by scurvy and other diseases, leaving only one alive who went insane from the ordeal, claiming he saw ghosts of several past wrecked ships' captains. In 1710, the pirate Captain Henry Smithfield of the infamous "Yago" found skull island and skillfully managed to sail through the island coral reefs unaided except by the light and a keen sailor's intuition. He was inspired to take over operation of the light, but eventually had to maroon the mad monk on a nearby deserted island as he was too crazy even for pirates! The light is still lit only occasionally, mostly when trying to wreck merchant and pirate hunter ships onto the reefs to be plundered thereon. This island is known to the area's native islanders as Hazar-dues, or to it's pirate inhabitants and imperial captives as Skull Rock. NOTE: The name of the island is said like the word, "Hazardous" (which is quite apt for it's windswept rocky surface!) I'm taking @Faladrin lead with his similar model and one-upping it to include the entire skull rock, and a dock for pirate ships of all types! NOTES: The set conversion is mostly (98%) finished as of 1/28/21. The as-yet unbuilt lighthouse portion is on order from Bricklink as of yesterday. This new piece will replace the crane section of the dock. I've also realized that all the set 71722's features are tied together by gearing / rods, such as: - The rotating scythes on the walkway to the officer's quarters behind the eyes. - the moving "wave" walkway to the base of the waterfall. (which opens up!) - the lowering / raising of the wooden cage holding the (deceased) bluecoat Admiral. ..and all this is activated by cranking the large U-shaped handle on the left! The front clips of sets 71722 (Skull Sorcerer's Dungeons) connect to a wooden dock model (seen below). The two Ninjago set's (the other is 71717, Journey to the Skull Dungeons) will be modified to have blue parts instead of orange and trans-orange for the bases and "lava drip" parts. I plan on using these sets, plus this dock, in conjunction with my other pirate ships, seen below. Inside the lower portion of Skull rock is the pirates treasure room, with gold aplenty and a few jewels. The upper floor is for the Captain Smithfield when not at sea. Here is the lighthouse proper. The wooden crane is for offloading cargo / loot off the smaller boats after leaving the big pirate ship. The spinning lens idea is from 70431 (Lighthouse of Darkness) from the Hidden Side theme. The front clips of sets 71722 (Skull Sorcerer's Dungeons) connect to a wooden dock model. (seen farther down the page) The two Ninjago set's (the other is 71717, Journey to the Skull Dungeons) are currently being modified to have blue parts instead of orange and trans-orange for the bases and "lava drip" parts. I plan on using these sets, plus all the custom dock / lighthouse parts for my island. This building model comes apart into three modular sections: - lighthouse, lower level (this is sleeping / storage area for the crew when not at sea.) - light house, upper level (storage area for whale oil for keeping the light lit) - actual light - (rotates around, though it's usually lit for use in misguiding ships onto the nearby rocky coral reef surrounding Skull Island.) The docks model also comes apart into three modular sections: - The working wooden crane (left side, which will be implemented into the lighthouse) - The corner with cannon (behind the others) - The dock extension (right side) Here is that unlucky monk today, with his one-shot pistol on Twenty-paces Island. (I'm getting a palm tree for this island.... still have to order the parts!) The whole setup of Skull Rock so far. The Minecraft-based Seacow, as captained by Peg-Leg Stevie. Not sure what to call this type of ship, though it kinda reminds me of the Santa Maria from Columbus' first trip. The brig Yago, as seen here and captained by Henry Smithfield. The Golden Bounty pirate junk, as seen in this topic and led by Captain Soto. (picture of Joly Roger goes here) Captain Hook's Jolly Roger isn't done yet, so no picture or topic... waiting on a certain flying boy for that. The Silver Crab is not built yet, but is captained by Bob "The Sponge" Squarepants and can be found here. This is the Hell Bent, and is led by Captain Victor "Jawbone" Blucher. It can be found here.
  6. This ship was heavily inspired by set 4195 (Queen Anne's Revenge) for the ship itself and set 31109 for the brick-built sails + pirate flag. The vessel is named the "Hell Bent", and is crewed by sailors-turned-demons, led by Captain Victor "Jawbone" Blucher. It will be built after the "Silver Crab" pirate ship is done. The vessel has eight cannons ready to fire at a moments notice. The rear of the ship has the nameplate on the stern, right below the custom brick-built pirate flag. The model has a removable steering area for access to the captain's quarters, which has a desk and chair with two wall lanterns nearby. Captain Victor (the figure on the right side) lost his lower jaw after a pistol shot at a vision of The Man Upstairs rebounded unto him, and was turned into a demon (along with his crew) by said entity for his crime against nature. He also gained an painful iron jawbone as an additional punishment, and so he could communicate with his crew verbally. The Hell Bent and it's crew have roamed the 7 seas for about 28 years now, only allowed to enter a port once every seven years for a week. Just like the legendary storm-tossed Flying Dutchman and it's infernal crew, this ship is a bad omen at sea for merchants, but strangely is considered a good one for pirates, since it was a pirate ship to begin with. Usually, if the ship is sighted by a merchant ship, the crewmate who saw it will then die and join the demon-crew's ranks, but for pirates, it is allowed to get closer to exchange news of the world via bags of mail / news clippings / etc. sent over in waterproofed bags. (In reality, I'm going to use Nexo Knights lava soldiers' heads and torsos for the crew and captain.) If you have any thoughts, questions, complaints, suggestions, or comments, please post them below!
  7. Captained by a Scottish fellow named Albert McCartney, this ship, the "Kintyre", originally operated out of what became one of the Southern-most English Colonies. There mission was as a privateer to harass any Spanish ships coming from the Caribbean to the old world with gold and silver, (plus harass and steal from the French), for around five years, starting in 1705. But eventually, McCartney grew tired of paying his due of treasure to the English crown, and set off to make his own way in the world "free" of any government. He moved his base of operations to a small island in the Caribbean with his crew, where there resided a abandoned French attempt at a fort from years prior. He got his crew to complete the fort, and used it as his base of operations. He plundered many a French, Spanish, and other nations' ships, along with his former comrades in the English navy. In early summer 1717 the Kintyre was last seen by some trappers on land (near what later became the port of Savannah, Georgia) sailing low in the water, going north, unknowingly into the path of a massive hurricane. The resulting wreck has never been found, and it was rumored to have been loaded to the gun-ports with gold and silver taken from a Spanish treasure ship by Florida's southern coast. (which had been found empty of most of it's treasure in the 1960's.) This could explain the heavily laden shape of the Kintyre that day in June 1717. As to what happened to the ship after it left the later-day Savannah area is anyone's guess, as it seems to have vanished without a trace off the face of the Earth. This ship is named the Kintyre, and is a recolor and MOD of set 31109 (3-in-1 Pirate Ship) in the Creator theme. She is captained by a Scottish fellow named Albert McCartney (nicknamed McCartney the Green for the color of his ship and clothes), a former (fictional!) privateer turned pirate. Some parts are missing, as the plastic pirate flag from Ninjago, 12 lattice window pieces, etc. And yes, the name of the ship and it's Captain are both Paul McCartney references. (The Mull of Kintyre and Uncle Albert / Admiral Halsey songs along with their creator's last name inspired the names of the ship and it's captain.) This MOD was also inspired by this very similar model by Eurobricks user @Wurger49. The name of the ship is supposed to go on the back of the captain's cabin spelled out in 1 x 1 printed tiles, located just below the flag pole. The Captain's cabin has a desk and chair. Eight cannons are ready for firing on the Kintyre. It was said by the trappers that last saw the Kintyre afloat that one or two cannons were pushed overboard to make the ship more buoyant. (Most likely against the weight of the treasure they had just stolen from the Spanish ship in Florida.) Excavations for enlarging the port of Savannah in the 1970's found two such cannons buried under two hundred year of ocean silt. These were confirmed by the proper authorities to be of the same age and type used by the English Navy around the time of Kintyre's construction in 1699. The only question remains is this: where is the rest of the ship and it's treasure? Questions comments, and complaints are always welcome!
  8. Hi everyone! At last I got my own 31109 which I started building the smalles build first, the 3rd model: Skull Island. I have seen several nice MOCs and MODs around this set so far so I wanted to add one myself. I saw all those left over pieces and so started to build a small pirate ship only by using the left-over pieces. Here is what I came up with: Hope you like it. If someone has a good idea for improvement, then you have to be fast or build your own addition to the island! I want to tear everything down soon to build the 2nd model and then the ship