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Found 6 results

  1. This modular station was inspired by a long since expired Cuusso / Ideas project, (not mine), and set 4554 Metro Station from 1991. I doubled the model in size and now added a quad-sided clock tower and removable six track long platform. I even put a wheelchair access ramp from the street side for compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). I plan on possibly getting the new station to replace this one after the Adventurers / CITY Jungle temple I'm building is done in real life. The street side of the station has space for 8 printed 1 x 1 letters, allowing you to name the station what you want along with a statue dedicated to the railroad's founder has been placed by the stairs. As a side not, the four clock faces are supposed to feature this print. The lower floor has the central ticket desk and two inside waiting rooms located under the two left and right wings. These wings also allow for access to the platform under the twin canopies. Also noticeable in this picture is the removable platform, which connects to the main model via a multitude of Technic pins. The second floor has the switching control room and station managers office which floats inside the exterior walls on some tile-topped pillars. This assembly is barely connected to the build by two studs. (NOTE: No stairs to the upper floor were made because that's how the official CITY sets are, so I didn't include any. Besides, it would have messed with symmetry of the station!) If you want to build this yourself, please see the LDD file here. Comments, questions and complaints are always welcome!
  2. This engine is modeled after the GE 44 ton switcher locomotive. Why 44 tons, you may ask? I give you the answer from the Wikipedia article on this loco type: This locomotive's specific 44-short ton weight was directly related to one of the efficiencies the new diesel locomotives offered compared to their steam counterparts: reduced labor intensity. In the 1940s, the steam to diesel transition was in its infancy in North America, and railroad unions were trying to protect the locomotive fireman jobs that were redundant with diesel units. One measure taken to this end was the 1937 so-called "90,000 Pound Rule" :[citation needed] a stipulation that locomotives weighing 90,000 pounds (41,000 kg) – 45 short tons – or more required a fireman in addition to an engineer on common carrier railroads. Industrial and military railroads had no such stipulation. The 44-ton locomotive was born to skirt this requirement. The loco is bi-directional, and doesn't have much to differentiate between the "front" or "rear" expect for the air horn and exhaust stack on one end in real life. My LEGO model lacks these, so it's only way to tell which is front is by the headlights: clear for front, red for rear. I am going to name this loco WFP number 7007. (WFP stands for Wabash Frisco & Pacific, which is the name of a 12 inch gauge ride-on railway in St. Louis, MO.) They don't have a real 44 toner there, but do have a Fairbanks Morse H10-44 (number 704) in the same color scheme, so I made this engine as a companion to the H10-44. In the spoiler tag below, you will find a real life picture of a 44-toner loco. (I got the picture from railpictures.net, It is NOT mine!) Just for comparison purposes, here is the H10-44 I was talking about. NOTE: The H10-44 is NOT included in the GE 44-ton's LDD file! The (updated) LDD file for the GE loco is available here. Build updated 3-14-17 with a better 44 ton GE unit, courtesy of Henry Durand over on Facebook's LEGO Train Fan Club. Thanks Henry! Comments, Questions, suggestions and complaints are always welcome!
  3. Polar Express Train Cars

    I'm still midway through my Santa Fe project, I need to get the files and everything uploaded to Rebrickable. I'm pretty sure I'm done with that, but I'm not sure what else to add to it before I get everything posted. For my new project, I thought I'd tackle the Polar Express! My collection is somewhat lacking in the train department, and given the difficulty of building steam in LDD, I decided I'd try to build the cars first. I had to sacrifice a few details for the sake of functionality, but besides that everything is pretty accurate and well proportioned IMHO. Some of these screenshots are slightly outdated, as I've moved the ladders to the bogies instead of the body, allowing for the couplers to be much closer since. This is the observation ending. This is the most recent screenshot of the car chassises, featuring the updated coupler and ladder positions. All the windows and doors are brick built, using transparent bricks, jumper plates, plates, and bricks. This allowed for the bodies to be much more accurate, with accurate window spacing and sizing. The base is also brick built, not using the standard train plates. One area I've always been self-conscious about is the rounded roofs on observation endings. I always experiment round for hours, playing with different combinations of tiles, curved plates, and cheese wedges. I'm still not 100% satisfied with the shape, but it seems to work for now. This is the interior. One of the biggest things I do when designing cars and locos is use jumper plates to put the seats, to give room for mini figures without using panels for windows and walls. This also allows for a larger corridor for mini figures and details. I tried to replicate the interior from the film, with the sideways facing seats, though there might be a table or two that I'm missing. I'll have to rematch the film for that detail. One of my favorite details is the SNOT for the back window, allowing for the three back windows present in the train car. I think this technique has merit for other prototypes, and you could modify it to make windows of most sizes while staying within the confines of 6 or 7 wide. There's also tiled floors, but you can easily delete the interior details to save cost if you decide to brick link them. If the maersk blue is a problem, it should be relatively easy to change to light blue, dark blue, or grey because it's all common bricks. Close up of the back windows, there's also jumper plates to stick figures in the back of the train. It's a bit short though, you may have to remove legs or only use short figs back there. Close up of the diaphragm. I used jumper plates and more SNOT to get them 3 wide, the correct width, without leaving gaps in the walls. I also added marker lights on the car ends, aside from the observation ending. The regular observation car. The interior of the regular observation car. I had trouble designing the seats, as I couldn't find dark red curved slopes, so I had to use cheese wedges and hinges to make the seats. Unfortunately, this means the seats are about a plate higher than I wanted them to be. If I could get some advice on that, it'd be awesome. My only complaint besides that would be that the observation ending platform is slightly delicate, as the floor and handrail is only held on by the tiles connecting it to the body. Files: polar_express_observation_car.lxf updated_polar_express_passenger_ending.lxf
  4. This station was inspired way back in 2013 by a long since expired Ideas project (link to my inspiration: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/34642 ), which was doubled in size and now features a double tracked platform + canopy and quad-sided clock tower. NOTE: You may want to cut two base-plates to a 8 x 40 size where the gaps are at the end of the platform. The station proper has removable upper roof and second floor sections. The top floor "floats" on tiles, and is removable to reach the sales counter on the main floor. Also removable is the platform and train canopy, as it is connected to the station via Technic pins. The double track train canopy was inspired by CITY set 60103, Airport Air Show, while the clock faces are supposed to feature this print: http://alpha.brickli...0pb024#T=C&C=11 The street side of the station has space for 8 printed 1 x 1 letters, allowing you to name the station what you want. If i ever did build this, which I probably won't, I would name it Glenncoe, after the location of a 12 inch ride-on real steam railway, The Wabash Frisco and Pacific Rail Road at Glencoe (spelled with only 1 "N") Missouri. (See their pretty cool website here: http://www.wfprr.com/default.htm ) The second floor has the switching control room and station managers office while the lower floor has the ticket desk and inside waiting rooms. By the way: the upper floor floats inside the walls on some tile-topped pillars, and is not connected to the build by studs in any way. NOTE: This train station most likely will never be built by me as I already have 3 stations as of now. But it IS build able in real life, so if anyone of you guys want to take a stab at this station, be my guest and please post the pictures both here and in your own thread. As such, here is the LDD file to the whole model, grouped so you can edit the station as you please: http://www.moc-pages...1463871791m.lxf Once again, questions, comments, and complaints are welcome!
  5. MOC: Grand Prix Auto Services

    Hello everyone! My latest build is finally complete after taking up most of my desk space for the last few months. It's called Grand Prix Auto Services. A Gas station/Garage which is of a streamlined style from around the 1930's/1940's USA. I struggled to build a car from that time with what bricks I have so went for a more late 50's look with the car and scooter. I've seen some great examples by fellow EB members L@GO and ER0L but felt with so many varied styles out there and not too many versions in Lego there was room for one more! Mostly I wanted to use some of the curved window pieces I had purchased some time ago and this was the perfect opportunity. Most of the model is built sideways with only a little vertical building in places. It's therefore a little less stable in certain sections. Anyway, enough waffle and on with the pics; Any feedback,comments or questions welcomed!
  6. Barrie's Department Store

    Hi everyone, Here is my latest build, Barrie's department store. It was inspired by a department store in my home city of Newcastle Upon-Tyne. I wanted to do a long building with a high window display and build something on a large scale. It comes with a fully furnished interior on 4 floors which consist of a food hall, home furniture, ladies wear and a restaurant on the top floor. I added a 1930's streamlined 'balloon' design tram to the street scene even if these were not found in Newcastle at that time but it was fun to build Here's a few exterior and interior shots; More pictures can be found on my flickr here http://www.flickr.co...s/52656812@N04/ Comments welcomed as always!