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Found 249 results

  1. The Lost Tomb, is one of my latest creations. Our adventurer, Indiana Jones, descovers the lost tomb of the Islanders' King. I hope you like my creation, and I am open for your comments! Take a close look at the video that follows; by George Patelis, on Flickr The Lost Tomb is Revealed by George Patelis, on Flickr You can find more photos at my Flickr Account
  2. Hi everyone, Two little question regarding Power Functions: 1. Is it possible to combine 2 L-motors with 2 XL-motors at the same time, working on the same gear of a car (2,0-2,5 kg) or will only motors of one type work? 2. How many M-, L- and XL-motors can be used on a single 8887 rechargable battery box (to move the same car as above) at the same time? Thank you in advance! xXFoxhound90
  3. Thought the EB Technic community might appreciate this remake of the 2001 Bionicle set I built for a contest on another forum. It features the same RC tracked drive and swiping claws as the original (this time powered by Power Functions elements, rather than a giant RC brick) plus light-up eyes via PF lights. https://youtu.be/Q76HBzIxZ0E (Apologies if this belongs in the Action Figures subforum - I thought it was probably a better fit for the Technic forum?)
  4. One of my more popular MOCs from Rebrickable: Compact Motorized Compressor with Auto-valve Link. Features: Air tank Automatic pressure switch M motor and 6L mini pump compressor Very compact 15 x 11 x 7 stud size Easy removal of battery box This compressor uses 1x 6L mini pneumatic pump but can easily be modified for two pumps, the automatic cut-off pressure can also be adjusted by changing the strength of the rubber bands attached to the pneumatic cylinder. Full gallery, 3D file, and PDF Instructions available on Bricksafe. Some photos: Auto-valve: The compressor working very fast:
  5. [GBW] Part 1: "The Power of the People" The Plantasea forces recruit men from all over the country in order to man all military units and reserves. The recent attack on Filace means only one thing: War is inevitable! [MOC] The Main Gate [GBW] by BoBKiD206, on Flickr The MOC: MOC] The Main Gate [GBW] by BoBKiD206, on Flickr MOC] The Main Gate [GBW] by BoBKiD206, on Flickr MOC] The Main Gate [GBW] by BoBKiD206, on Flickr MOC] The Main Gate [GBW] by BoBKiD206, on Flickr MOC] The Main Gate [GBW] by BoBKiD206, on Flickr As a small extra, the MOC features Power Function lighting. The following pic was taken in total darkness with just the power fuctions lights on. [MOC] The Main Gate [GBW] by BoBKiD206, on Flickr
  6. Hello fellow builders! I felt that it was finally time to share with you all something that I've been working on/ playing with for a while now: My L-Motor Frame. L-Motor Block Types by Nick Jackson, on Flickr The concept for this project was to create a stable platform on which (primarily) steam engines could be produced with less motor& cable obstructions. L-Motor Block Types by Nick Jackson, on Flickr This would then allow the engine's body to be built relatively free of electrical components, or crammed with them in the case of tank engines. L-Motor Block Variants by Nick Jackson, on Flickr I think that the most interesting part of the frame is the fact that it is easily modifiable, and can essentially go from 2 to 7 axles! At the time of writing this however, I've only dared to go up to 4 axles for a related project. L-Motor Block Variants (2) by Nick Jackson, on Flickr Hopefully these frames and their different gear ratios will inspire you to make a steam engine! Although, there are a great many European engines that are not steam, but employ connecting rods for their drive wheels. L-Frame with Medium-Large wheels by Nick Jackson, on Flickr Lastly, here are some alternative wheel sizes that you may be interested in. These are made possible by the work of BigBen Bricks and @Shupp. The smallest feasible size would be the Medium-Large drivers by Shupp. These would need a bit of reworking from a standard L-Frame in order to clear switches and such. New Wheels!!! (2) by Nick Jackson, on Flickr Here, a set of XL wheels from BigBen fit nicely on a standard frame. L-Frame with XXL wheels by Nick Jackson, on Flickr And, by upgrading to the longer frame size, you could even accommodate 6 of Shupp's XXL wheels! Hopefully this post will benefit everyone, but moreso people who've had a difficult time getting into trains, and especially steam! Please, let me know your thoughts, and definitely share your ideas for a potential future build that might benefit from this design! Oh, and here's the link to the files: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B9xAgBdzDImZaFFsM2lGVkdmcEk Thanks for reading, ~M_Slug357~
  7. Hi! Two years ago, I did a motorizable cherry picker for a contest on the french forum TechLUG. So, I used the comments I had, and I decided to : - Use a more little scale - Better proportions - I did a better cab. In the first MOC, it was too heavy because of the battery box inside it. - The first cherry picker was motorizable by a M motor ; this one is only motorized, more simple and efficient. To summararise : Better proportions (I hope ^^) Only motorized I use inverted gearboxes for : - Outriggers - Arm - Turn table And the manual functions : - The steering (of course) - Extension of the arm So, here's the result: The simplest function is the steering. But there is the L motor over it. So, I used three 16t gears to turn the wheels directly by their axle of rotation. And now, the gearbox. It's an inverted gearbox : the "out gears" turn in the opposite sense. So, when you invert the position of the driving ring, you invert the rotation of a function. Here are screenshots: The outriggers can up the truck: the wheels don't touch the floor. To finish, the arm. It has a triple deformable quadrilateral. I needed so much time to do it, but it's nice to see in action. And the video :
  8. Im new to this forum so hi everyone ;) i have fun with PF from few months, and i want to buy a li-po and customize it to lego, i got two of real power hungry buggy motors, and i want to feed em' as much as i can :D I only need to know which voltage is maximum for motors, and for reciever, i have maken a research across internet, and ive heard that motors can handle max 16volts , and reciever just 9 volts, but ive heard too that motors can handle max 12 volts and that reciever too, on many forums i have read different numbers, so i have to ask here :) i have found light and small 14,8 volt li po 850 mah, in good price and i like it, but i dont want to burn my buggy motors and rest of PF, im wondering too about rc unit voltage, if it have 6 aa 1,5v bateries fully charged, it could generate 9v as normal pf battery box but when i compared them, rc unit is way better, and buggy motors are way faster, i hope that someone can help me :)
  9. While looking to buy a PF V2 receiver (58123bc01) I realized that it is only in 9398 and 41999 (both 4x4 crawlers), but is not in later sets like 42030 and 42065. I have been confused by this because I thought that it was suppose to replace the old receiver (58123c01). One thing I thought was that the insides were changed but they didn't have V2 printing, but why I don't know. Hopefully someone knows what's going on!
  10. This is my latest MOC: an Ariel Atom 500 in 1:9 scale! Technically it isn't a true scale model since I didn't use exact dimensions (I just build what I think looks best), but size-wise it's about 1:9. The real car is the fastest ever variant of the Ariel Atom, a street-legal car built for track racing. Released in 2008, the Atom 500 features a 3-litre transverse-mounted V8 made from two motorbike engines. It produces 500 horsepower (hence the name) and redlines at a rather insane 10,500 RPM. Other modifications include massive wings and the gold-painted exoskeleton. The car weighs only 550kg, giving it a power:weight ratio of over 900hp/tonne (higher than anything short of a Koenigsegg) - It recorded a 0-60mph time of just 2.3 seconds and could reach 200mph. It was the fastest road-legal car around the Top Gear Test Track for over two years. That record lap was on damp tarmac - had the track been dry, it would probably still be at the top. Only 25 of these cars were made, selling for around £200,000 each. My model features: Remote control drive and steering with Power Functions - 1 XL motor for drive and 1 M motor for steering 4-speed sequential gearbox operated with paddle-shifters Working steering wheel Full independent suspension with longitundinally-mounted shock absorbers Steering has zero scrub radius V8 engine replica with moving pistons The zero-scrub radius was a new idea for me. When playing around with suspension linkages, I discovered that mounting the links in a certain way would cause all four to move when turning (rather than just the steering link). The center of steering was further outwards, almost exactly in the middle of the wheels (I think it's where the suspension links would intersect when extended, but I'm not sure of this). The geometry I chose works almost perfectly for 68.8x36 ZR tyres on 56mm rims. Here's a picture of the steering links in their two extreme positions superimposed - the point where the wheel shafts intersect is the center of steering: The suspension is standard double-wishbone in the rear, but with a sideways lever converting the upwards motion of the suspension into longitudinal movement of the shock absorber: The transverse V8 was very difficult to fit in because it has even dimensions and the rest of the chassis has odd dimensions. It is connected directly to the XL motor The interior (or as close as you can get to an interior in an Atom) features two racing-style seats, a steering wheel and paddle shifters: The aesthetics were rather difficult at times. The framwork was very difficult even with the 42055 yellow parts (in fact, getting that set is the reason why I built this model), and at times I had to use some tricks. For example, the rear framework looks like it has two beams crossing in an X-formation when in fact the left and right halves of the "X" are two separate structures: I also replicated the exhaust pipes and gigantic rear wing. One of my favourite parts of the model is the side intake and its red stripe: The PF IR receiver is disguised as the air intake and roll hoop: For more pictures of the car, see my video below. Music is composed by me as well: [media]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RhmgbCIpHT0[/media] This project is also on LEGO Ideas! I know the success rate is extremely low for such projects, but it would be amazing if this set because a reality! Please support my project here. Any support is much appreciated.
  11. Hi, My latest project is not a Lego creation but an Android app that lets you control the SBrick with any Android-compatible game controller. Here is a short demo video on it: Please note that it's not available yet since it's still in WIP. Current features: - Works on Android 4.3+ devices supporting bluetooth low energy profile. - Basically works with any type of Android-compatible game controllers (I'm using a cheap one from DX). Leftovers until I release the first test version: - Profile editor is not yet finished. - Stability issues. - Minor UI updates. Any comments or suggestions are welcome :)
  12. Hey builders! Recently I made a LEGO power functions laser (topic can be found here), and it got me thinking... what els can I build? That's how I came to the idea of making a LEGO electromagnet! Making it was actually a whole lot easier than making the LEGO laser. The LEGO laser required a 9 volt to 5 volt converter and reversed -polarity protection. The electromagnet was already made for 9 volt and it does not care about polarity. I just got the motor out and unhooked the 2 wires, then connected those 2 wires to the electromagnet and... it worked! I'm amazed by the strength of this small thing, under good conditions (unpainted, flat metal) it can lift up to 6 kilo's! I have no specific idea of how to use it in MOC but I'm sure I'll think of a good application for it. All suggestions are welcome by the way Tell me what you think ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ BUILDING LOG weight: 78 gramscapacity: 6 kilo+ To make one yourself you need: PARTS: - a 9 volt electromagnet (ebay is a good source, I bought mine for 5.46$). - some glue (I used hot glue) - soldering tin & shrink tube TOOLS: - flathead screwdriver or prying tool - soldering iron -lighter (for shrink tube) First you need to open up the PF XL motor housing, this is quite hard. I found the best way is to squeeze it just a bit in a vice so the outer shell becomes oval and you can stick a small thin screwdriver in the gap to open it(mind the position in the vice!). This is what you will find on the inside: Disconnect the 2 wires attached to the motor, put the top half of the casing is a vice and dremel out the center rougly to the size of you electromagnet: Then make everything perfectly round with a small file untill the electromagnet fit's snug in the housing: After pressing it in the housing, get 2 lego beams and attach them to the 2 forward facing holes. this way you can make the magnet perfectly flush when mounted in a MOC: Then seal the electromagnet firmly in place using glue (I used hot glue). Next you solder the 2 wires coming from your electromagnet to the 2 wires that were attached to the motor (the inner 2 strands of the 4 strand LEGO wire, polarity does not matter). Make sure you use shrink tube to isolate both wires! Then glue the motor plate (holding the LEGO wire) in place and test the magnet! If it works close it up and you're done!! I hope you enjoined this build log, if you have any questions just let me know!
  13. A model I've been working for a little while, not much to show yet but pictures soon. 6x6 truck with locking rear diffs and 2 central diffs in the 6x6 drive making for a combination of power delivery choices, similar to the drive train of the mercedes amg 6x6. Using tires from 42054 so its, big near half a meter or so now. Rear live axel suspensions front independet fake v 10 soon to be geared in, possinble addition of 4 speed gearbox and 4 xl motors for drive. with fully rc gear and diff lock control and who knows what else?
  14. I began to work on my 1st Technic moc yesterday to see what I could come up with. Here's my progress. I'm quite pleased with where I'm at and what I could accomplish, even if it is basic by many Technic builder standards. It drives nice on carpet, though I'd love to have those rubber dots to make it work on hard surfaces. 20170318_121559 by topazard, on Flickr 20170318_121636 by topazard, on Flickr 20170318_121659 by topazard, on Flickr Trying to figure out how to add a function will have to wait until next weekend (hopefully). By then I might have the parts to finish off the marbled top. For anyone wondering this is supposed to be a Grangemouth 3001.
  15. Hello, Eurobricks. I wanted to post this page because a few days back, I FINALLY managed to get a 4x8 train motor, so I could motorize the engines on my Lego Helicarrier. But when I put in all the power function accessories, the lights came on, but the rotors barely spun for a second. I was wondering if anyone else had motorized their helicarrier, and experienced a similar problem. If so, do you have any solutions to how on fix the problem? Thank you, Th3_Br1ck_Kid
  16. Here's a little 42030 C-model (+ extra wheels, ONLY added extra parts). It was meant to be just a remedy for boredom while ill, so I build "just so", whatever comes to my mind - just wanted it to be remote controlled. But I quite like the result: a flamboyant van perfect for just cruising around and scaring people. It performs well enough for a heavy, single XL motor-powered model. The gearing somehow makes it slower on reverse which is a fringe benefit, realism-wise. Steering is quite good, turn radius is tight. 35 studs long body + 5 studs long "wings". Functions and feats: ► RC driving and steering ► sliding side doors on the right side, opening doors and fuel cap ► supercharger's scoop in the rear tilts up to reveal the gap leading towards the on/off switch that is activated by rod that can be kept on a special pivoted rack inside the van (you can use the "flag" poles as well, but that's just barbaric) ► non-functional decorated interior, including seats, steering wheel, gear shifter and handbrake ► details such as supercharger scoop, roof-mounted horns, floodlights and break lights, rear view mirrors, exhaust pipes, fenders, flags, radio antenna, floored interior
  17. Hey Guys, Currently purchasing parts for my first project (more on that later), but starting plan the next one. I am looking to build a narrow gauge steam locomotive and railway with the Indiana Jones track. I am looking at a classic 4-6-0 ten-wheeler, similar to the Lone Ranger Constitution but scaled more to narrow gauge. Ala Walter E. Disney: or more like Tweetsie No. 12: To scale to narrow gauge on the 3-wide IJ track I wanted to use 50254 for the leading truck wheels and three sets of 55423 for the drivers. My issue is gearing the drivers while still making it look like a steamer on the outside. I am aware of Space2310's bogie, but was trying to keep the outside a little less clunky and just having a driver rod with something like 32065 or custom Zephyr rods. So I am asking for your help to design a 3 axle narrow gauge PF bogie, hopefully internally framed. The center axle probably has to be floating to contend with the 3-wide sharp curved IJ track... Any bogie gurus out there?!
  18. Greetings Train Tech, This MoC was actually built over a year ago! I originally designed and built it for use as a "demonstrator" model for a how-to post on Power Functions steam locomotives that I haven't gotten around to writing (although the precursor post is available). While we're waiting on that, I figured I might as well post this model. Prototype History British Railways built this class of 2-6-2 tank engines for a mixed traffic role. Apparently they were very similar to the LMS Ivatt Class 2 2-6-2T, from which they were derived. While none of the class survived into preservation, The Bluebell Railway is rebuilding one of the related 2-6-0 tender locomotives into an example of this class. Engineering Details Usually when I build a MoC, I start with the prototype in mind, then work towards the model. This model began with the desire to build "a small steam locomotive to demonstrate Power Functions", which then determined the choice of prototype. The Standard/Ivatt Class 2 has a number of helpful features in this regard: Small tank engine Large bunker could hide a Power Functions receiver Side tanks can cover up other Power Functions components And indeed, that's how the locomotive is laid out: Even so, the locomotive is quite cramped -- there wasn't enough room for an M-motor based transmission, so I went back to the trusty 9V gearmotor. The output shaft of the motor is very close to the driving axle: ... and it took me a couple tries before I found a good solution: The side tanks contain a channel that allows a cable to pass through, connecting the motor and receiver: The power button is on top of the smokebox and is only held in by gravity: Thank you for reading. Full Brickshelf gallery here.
  19. Rules: Every vehicle is powered with a standard AA batterybox and a single medium motor. Length or width shouldn't exceed 16 studs. Prizes are awarded for prettyness, originality, best crash, and fastest speed. In that order. Prizes in this case were won by eti, lucrichters, koffiemoc, and trijntje, In that order. Adapt rules as needed.
  20. Lately I updated my CSX locomotives that I built back in 2014-2015. Since I perfected similar models with the Florida East Coast builds, I just took what I did and applied it to the models. Plus, I improved on where I placed my battery box making the engine much easier to operate! Here's video of me running it around my layout at Gold Coast Railroad Museum. I also threw in some model O Scale footage, perhaps for comparison Enjoy!
  21. flickr ~ "See you at Brickworld Chicago!"
  22. SET REVIEW: 10254 WINTER HOLIDAY TRAIN (including Power Functions) Introduction It is my pleasure to present to the EB community a review of the 10254 Winter Holiday Train. This is the latest yearly installment in the Winter Village series of sets from The LEGO Group and promises to be an exciting addition to Winter Village collections which do not have the previous winter-themed train 10173 Holiday Train released in 2006. Since the release of that earlier set, we have seen many other trains released that fall outside the standard LEGO City theme, such as the Emerald Night and Horizon Express. I have been impressed with those models and so my hopes for this set were very high on hearing of the release. For many fans, a winter train that doesn't cost a small fortune on the secondary market is to be welcomed. I hope that this review will assist you all with considering whether to add this set to your collection. I have also included a segment on the adaptability to use with Power Functions, which I think is a really well thought out part of this set, although the set DOES NOT come with the Power Functions parts necessary to motorise it; these are sold separately. My thanks to EB LUG Ambassador CopMike and the LEGO CEE Team and Designers for the opportunity to review this set for the EB community. Set information Name: Winter Holiday Train Number: 10254 Theme: LEGO Creator / Winter Holiday Theme Year: 2016 Pieces: 734 Price: USD $99.99, GBP 69.99£, EURO 89,99€, NZD $179.99 Resources: Brickset, BrickLink Packaging I'll begin with some images of the packing for this set. The box is of moderate size (479x282x89mm) and features great detail shots on the back. One side features a layout of the included track including measurements of the size of the train and diameter of the circular track. The close-up shots on the back of the box give a good indication of the various play features this set has, which will be discussed later in this review. It also makes it clear that the set can be motorised with certain power functions sets, sold separately. Box Front Box Rear Box Close-Ups Box Contents The box contains 7 plastic bags of parts, 1 for part 1, 3 for part 2, 2 for part 3 and a separate one containing wheels and couplings. There are also 4 sets of 4 curved track pieces and two instruction manuals contained inside plastic packaging to prevent creasing. No cardboard behind the instruction manuals but they were unbent and in good shape. The set contains no sticker sheet. Contents Overall Individual Contents Instruction Booklet There are two instruction booklets with this set. The first is a small half size booklet containing instructions for the first part of the build: the station and presents. The second booklet is A4 opening along the long edge not the short edge and contains instructions for the full train. First Booklet Booklet Size Comparison Inside Sample Pages Minifigures The set comes with 5 minifigures, two children and three adults: the train conductor, engineer and a passenger. There is a nice variety of colours and unique prints here, with one face printed on both sides and four of the five torsos printed on both sides. The train conductor has some nice details such as the gold pocket watch. The choice of face for the conductor is my one criticism of this selection. While he could look old and serious, to me he looks grumpy, and this is particularly evident in some of the box art where we see him waving from the back of the train and helping load presents; he doesn't look like he wants to be there at all! It does at least add some variety to the usual cheery faces however. The female adult minifigure has the dual-sided face. The first side shows a big enthusiastic smile, perfect for posing with the playing children. The opposite side tells a different story; here we see a peaceful sleeping face, likely happy to have a moment to rest (I'm sure most parents can understand this one!). It works quite well in the box art with the woman sleeping on the train station bench while the children play around her. There is a good variety of head accessories with several different types of hair, so this set will add a bit of diversity to a Winter Village collection. Minifigures Front Minifigures Back Minifigure Alternative Face Interesting Train Parts I thought some of the train parts deserved a picture of their own before we get to building the set. There are a couple of different sizes of train wheel, with the biggest driving wheels in red and the engine leading wheels in red also with some black ones for one of the carriages. The rest of the carriage wheels are standard black train wheels that connect with a thin metal rod. The picture below shows one of each size, as well as a couple of other train parts such as the not so common pilot piece (cowcatcher) which will go on the front and the magnetic couplings, of which there are 5 in the set (1 for the back of the train and 2 for each carriage). I also included the white leaves because why not, I like them. Train Parts (and white tree piece) The Build - Part 1: Platform and Presents Now let's get on to the build. Part one contains the small station platform, two minifigures and all of the presents in the set. There are some interesting parts including a clear 2x2 domed piece, roller skates, a printed 1x1 tile with a number pad on it and a nice assortment of small coloured pieces. And of course we can't forget an orange brick separator! Parts contained in Part 1 We then move to building the station. The station is quite small but has a couple of nice details such as the snow tiles (always nice to have white 1x3 tiles) and the lamp post. As far as lamp posts go I wouldn't call this one my favourite, but it is nice enough and seems to be a compulsory requirement of most Winter Village style sets. This improves on previous single-lamp posts from Winter Village sets, trying a different piece for the glass rather than the two-part sphere pieces and uses the green life saver piece as a wreath, which is nice, with a touch of gold as well to brighten things up. The simple bench finishes the station off. Overall a simple little build, not intended to be a major part of the set but nonetheless it is a necessary one. Railway Station Next we have the present,s which are always a bit of fun. There is a nice selection of presents in the set, with three wrapped gifts, a robot, a boat, a spaceship, a fire engine and a windup toy. The robot is very cute and can hold items with its "hands". The child minifigure also comes with a radio piece suggesting the toys can be remote controlled for a bit of added play/imagination value. I like the design of these presents; they are recogniseable and also sturdy. Presents The whole first part to the build makes for a nice collection of items that will add to a Holiday-themed scene. There is a nice assortment of colours and presents in here, plenty to be delivered by train to the waiting children! Completed Part 1 Build Let's not forget the spare parts, this section comes with a few. Spare Parts for Part 1 of the Build The Build - Part 2: Locomotive Part 2 of the build is my favourite as now we get to build the locomotive! This part contains the engine and tender. The selection of parts for the locomotive presents a nice range of shapes and colours, primarily black, green and red. Some of the interesting train parts have already been noted. Parts contained in Part 2 The engine build was fun, not too complex but with some interesting parts used to create the shape of the train, such as axes and goblets. Build in Progress The driving wheels are on their own block, which includes a technic brick for the pin connection with the tender; no coupling here. Attaching the Driving Wheels The floating leading wheels have a couple of decorative features that stand out from the usual, including multiple colours (red and some small gold 1x1 round plates for a little extra bling) plus the distinctive pilot piece (cowcatcher) which makes the shape of this loco stand out. The Leading Wheels Now we just need to add the cab and finish the boiler! Completed Chassis with all Wheels The completed engine is a polished build with lots of colour and a distinctive small steam engine silhouette. The locomotive is categorised as a 4-2-0 with four leading wheels and two driving wheels. The design is based on a Jervis type engine. The scale is too small to replicate many steam engine features like the Emerald Night manages, but the shape has many distinctive features such as the cone-shaped funnel and distinctive pilot on the front. I particularly like the curve of the boiler which is a nice improvement from the 10173 set with its very angular boiler. The Finished Engine Some of the details include a smoke plume, domed safety valve, a gold bell and the cylinders for the pistons (although there are no moving pistons unfortunately). Engine Side The cab of the engine is quite cozy, with just enough space to fit a single minifigure. There are two brackets for tools and a generic printed train control panel which doesn't really fit the steam locomotive that well. An attempt at some valves and a safety glass would have been nice, although difficult in the limited space (potentially the white bar near the top could be a safety glass, use your imagination!). Engine Cab All in all I do like the profile of this engine, it has some neat colours and details for the size and the shape is easily recogniseable. One or two improvements could be made but on the whole it is an attractive build to have at the front of the train. Engine Front Profile Next in this Part is the tender for the engine. As far as tenders go, I again really like the side profile of this, it has a good shape that compliments the engine,as we will see. The Tender Looking inside, there is a little less detail. We have a single sloped plate with some black round pieces near the top to represent coal. The engine doesn't have anything resembling a firebox inside the cab anyway! The coal is only near the top edge, to be visible over the sides I imagine. Inside the Tender The back end of the tender has a few nice pieces to add some texture to what would otherwise be a black plate, so this adds some interest to the build. Her we have our first magnetic coupling piece to connect up to the wagons. Back of the Tender On the whole the tender has some nice colur and details; it serves its purpose. The inside is not as exciting as the outside, but to add any more detail to the coal piles would require a lot of smaller piece (which, with the part to cost ratio, may not have been impossible). Let's see what it looks like all connected up. Complete Engine and Tender Overall this locomotive is a great build. It looks good on display and will definitely look impressive with other Winter Village sets. It may be quite small compared to other Lego trains, but it fits well into the theme. I mostly like the colour scheme, although the white at the front stands out at me a bit much. In the design, the biggest flaw in my opinion is the coupling between the engine and the tender, which can be seen more clearly in the next picture. I really dislike that to uncouple the tender from the engine it is necessary to lift the tender off the tracks (unless you are really set on pulling that pin out of the tender piece). Two more magnetic couplings would not have gone amiss here, like on the Emerald Night between the engine and tender. Locomotive Side View Coupling aside, I do like this engine, and it is just the right size for a circular track too (often the bigger trains look very long on a simple circle). Here are a couple of pictures of it on some track before we build the carriages. Some of the genius of this design will become evident in the final segment of this review when I adapt the train to motorise it with Power Functions elements. Locomotive goes Choo Choo Choo Choo Off into the Distance And let's not forget the spare parts! Part 2 Spare Parts The Build - Part 3: Carriages The last part of the set is the build for the two carriages; a flatbed for presents (with a Christmas-train twist) and a small caboose. There is a wide assortment of pieces, shown below. Pieces in Part 3 We start building the flatbed first. I like the intricacy of this build for what is essentially a flat wagon, it packs some neat design features. Flatbed Build Progress The gold and dark blue elements on the sides (using a Studs Not On Top building technique) are nice touches, but what I really like about this carriage is that the Christmas Tree and miniature train on top rotate as the carriage moves along the tracks! This is so much fun and uses a worm gear to make sure it doesn't spin too fast. Christmas Tree Spin Mechanic The miniature train itself is very cute and curves around under the tree like so. Train on a train folks, does it get better than this? The presents from part one can be stored in the section on the right. With the tree added, it is a nice carriage, far more interesting than most rolling stock flat beds, the Christmas vibe is impossible to miss (although perhaps not the most practical carriage at other times of year!). Flat Bed Complete Next up is the small caboose, which is a nice carriage to sit at the back of the train. Inside is a small table with two chairs, a cup and what could be a lamp or a flask full of hot chocolate if you have that on your mind! Caboose Build in Progress The completed carriage is nice, small but with features including the raised roof in the middle, gold lanterns at each end and the white leaves with coloured baubles, replicated from the tender. The roof is easily removable to place minifigures inside. Completed Caboose As for swoosh-ability around the track, it gets a pass. Choo Choo Caboose! That completes part 3, so we'll end with the two carriages together. The carriages are good builds and fit the Christmas theme well; we have a tree, a place to store presents and a cozy table to sit around and drink a warm drink (ignoring that it may be a bit drafty with the gaps around the doors with the train is moving!). The single tan axle on the flatbed train really bugs me in terms of colour scheme, but other than that I don't have any complaints. Completed Part 3 Carriages Complete Set There we have it, all done! Before I move to the conclusion however, I would like to throw in the optional Power Functions elements, all sold separately. Power Functions (Sold Separately) One thing that really impressed me about the design of this set is how easy it is to motorise it. To do so, you will need the following four Power Functions pieces/sets which are ALL SOLD SEPARATELY. Alternatively, if you own a recent Lego City train set, you can raid the parts from that, like I did. For those of you looking to purchase these separately, the set numbers are 8879, 8884, 88000 and 88002. Power Functions Parts (Sets 8879, 8884, 88000 and 88002) The set includes instructions for pulling the locomotive apart to fit in the Power Functions elements. For such a small train, they manage to cram these parts in really well! Here is the disassembled engine to show what needs to be removed so that you can add the powered wheels and remote control hub. Disassembled Engine The modules come apart quickly and easily and the whole thing can be motorised within a couple of minutes. There is a hole in the floor of the cab for the cables to come up through, and then the rest of the cables just.. sort of fit in there. That's the only downside to motorising this set; some of the design features are lost and, due to the size, the grey Power Functions parts can't easily be hidden without changing the shape or using a lot more parts, so some of the aesthetic is lost. Motorised Train That said, the designers did a great job of not only incorporating the Power Functions but making it easy to do so, and easy to switch back too. As noted though, it is quite hard to hide, particularly the cables, which mostly do manage to fit inside the cab with some spillage. Cables After motorising your train, you are also left with a few parts to do with as you will, or to swap back into place for display purposes. Motorised Train with Spare Segments Overall, very impressed with the Power Functions conversion considering the size of the build. Conclusion It is necessary to come up with a score for the set, so here are my thoughts below overall. Design: 8/10 – The set is well designed and has some interesting play features. The spinning tree is notable and there are a lot of accessories to increase play value. This was a 7 as I do think improvements could be made, but I have given it an 8 as the quick adaptability to Power Functions really blew my mind a bit! Parts: 8/10 – An interesting selection of parts with some good colour options for use in future building. Build: 9/10 – The build experience is fun and engaging but not too complex. This would be a good set to build in an afternoon with the kids at Christmas. There is nothing repetitive and there are lots of fun features to discover as you build. Price: 6/10 – The price per piece is unfortunately a downside to the set, coming in at 0.136 USD per piece. That said I still value the build and design so I would not let this discourage you. It is a bit too costly I would say just to buy for parts, but certainly worth it for the build experience and display model (certainly an improvement on last year's Winter Village re-release...). Overall view: It's a great addition to the Winter Village series in my view. There are a lot of features, a lot of interesting and colourful parts, and the build is fun to do. One more carriage would have been a nice addition but other than that and the few design points noted throughout, the set is a great build and the adaptability to Power Functions is quick and easily done in a few minutes. Of course if you are more traditional and wish to push the set around yourself, it also works well for that. I would recommend displaying without any Power Functions on it if possible as they do remove some of the details and the battery box in particular is not at all concealed. As with many train sets, it does not come with much track (so as to keep the price down), but this can be expanded with additional track sold separately. Thanks for reading and do let me know your thoughts on this Winter Village installation in the comments below. Will you be buying it? Or have you already bought it? Feel free to share your views and your own pictures!
  23. Hello everyone. This is my modification of the truck vith container trailer. It is RC with power functions. 1 servo motor for steering 1 M motor for driving it is simply very cute to me and just fantastic to drive with this litle cute truck. and one simple video That's all for now. Best regards, Valter
  24. still working for 3 months into this moc, get some inspiration by the swith trick from the new 2017 blue tow truck, still lots things to do here, but each week i improove something, lets see where it will goes latest video: Thanks so much! Omar
  25. Hello everybody, here are my latest creations, two (almost similar) Swedish T44 Diesel locomotives. Base measures 8wide x L32studs, and body contains: -A medium PF motor in the rear compartment, that powers a decoupling system in rear boggie. -IR receiver in drivers cab. -Std PF battery box in the front compartment. -A std PF train motor takes care of propulsion. One channel on PF controller is used for decoupling, and the other channel is used for running the PF train motor. Coulor scheme is the former standard of SJ (Swedish state railways) as: Orange / White stripe / DkBlue top. T44 is (still) the most common freight diesel locomotive in Sweden and was originally built in 123 units. I made two units with same mechanics but slightly different detailing. I made several different designs for remote decoupling, but this one is more or less borrowed from Baard, which in turn was inspired by my previous attempts. The mini LA (linear actuator) moves the magnet in and out, thus separating the loco magnet from wagon magnet for a remote controlled shunting. Any comments are welcome as usual.