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Found 6 results

  1. This engine is modeled after the GE 44 ton switcher locomotive. Why 44 tons, you may ask? I give you the answer from the Wikipedia article on this loco type: This locomotive's specific 44-short ton weight was directly related to one of the efficiencies the new diesel locomotives offered compared to their steam counterparts: reduced labor intensity. In the 1940s, the steam to diesel transition was in its infancy in North America, and railroad unions were trying to protect the locomotive fireman jobs that were redundant with diesel units. One measure taken to this end was the 1937 so-called "90,000 Pound Rule" :[citation needed] a stipulation that locomotives weighing 90,000 pounds (41,000 kg) – 45 short tons – or more required a fireman in addition to an engineer on common carrier railroads. Industrial and military railroads had no such stipulation. The 44-ton locomotive was born to skirt this requirement. The loco is bi-directional, and doesn't have much to differentiate between the "front" or "rear" expect for the air horn and exhaust stack on one end in real life. My LEGO model lacks these, so it's only way to tell which is front is by the headlights: clear for front, red for rear. I am going to name this loco WFP number 7007. (WFP stands for Wabash Frisco & Pacific, which is the name of a 12 inch gauge ride-on railway in St. Louis, MO.) They don't have a real 44 toner there, but do have a Fairbanks Morse H10-44 (number 704) in the same color scheme, so I made this engine as a companion to the H10-44. In the spoiler tag below, you will find a real life picture of a 44-toner loco. (I got the picture from railpictures.net, It is NOT mine!) Just for comparison purposes, here is the H10-44 I was talking about. NOTE: The H10-44 is NOT included in the GE 44-ton's LDD file! The (updated) LDD file for the GE loco is available here. Build updated 3-14-17 with a better 44 ton GE unit, courtesy of Henry Durand over on Facebook's LEGO Train Fan Club. Thanks Henry! Comments, Questions, suggestions and complaints are always welcome!
  2. After some conversation in another thread I realized I haven't posted any of my more recent builds on here, including one of my boxcab electric locomotives. I figured I would put some details about both of my New Haven electric locomotives, since both fit this category. Many of you may have seen these on Flickr or at shows but I presume that many of you haven't seen them yet, though I could be wrong. First up is the newest one, my New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad (NYNH&H) EF-1: The EF-1 class was built in 1912 by Baldwin-Westinghouse and remained in service until 1957 (outlasting their "successors," the EF-2's by 9 years). The were frequently used on the New York Connecting Railroad (a joint venture to connect the New Haven and Pennsylvania Railroads) hauling freight from New England to the Long Island Rail Road's transfer bridges in Brooklyn, NY. Due to the grades on this route they were typically operated in triple, and I've even seen a photo of four of them hauling a long freight over the Hell Gate Bridge. The model is equipped with two PF train motors which power the four large drivers, and Brickstuff lights in the main headlight and four front marker lights. Contrary to everything I've read on here, I've had no problems using large drivers on a PF train motor (well, none yet). My plan is to build freight cars until this can no longer haul any more, then build a second and repeat until I have three of them. My second (well, first) boxcab electric is my NYNH&H EP-3: The EP-3 class was built by General Electric in 1931, and featured both pantographs and third rail shoes so they could run into either Grand Central Terminal or Pennsylvania Station in New York. The EP-3s performed so well that the Pennsylvania railroad borrowed three of them for tests that resulted in the design of the world famous GG1. As with my EF-1 this uses two PF train motors powering eight of the large drivers, and was able to keep considerable speed at Brickworld this past summer with five heavy passenger cars in tow: New Haven Meet at Brickworld Chicago Also I'm working on a NYNH&H EP-2, which is still very much of a WIP: Cheers!
  3. Confession: I have been wanting to build a Bipolar for a long time, about four years. Longer than the Daylight or my Aerotrain models have been around, even on my computer, and longer than most of my 80+ strong fleet. Now, after years of waiting and thinking, designing and red developing: it is here! But first, here is what it's based on: The Real life inspiration: (Photo from Wikipedia) Real life inspiration: From 1919 to 1962, the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (known as the Milwaukee Road) had these five General Electric-made behemoths pulling trains under the wires from Chicago to Seattle. They were called the Bipolar's for each of the locomotive's 12 motors had only two field poles, mounted directly to the locomotive frame beside the axle. The motor armature was mounted directly on the axle, providing an entirely gear-less design. These locos were so powerful they could out-pull modern steam locos, and what used to take two steamers took just one bipolar. However, after a disastrous 1953 rebuilding by the railroad's company shops (who had no clue how to work on a electric loco) the engines were prone to failures and even fire. And so, in 1962, four of them were scrapped with the lone survivor, numbered E-2, towed to the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis Missouri, where it has sat silent even since. LEGO Model: This model was inspired by a 1999 version of the engine built by user legosteveb. I recreated the actual orange, red and black color scheme used on the loco when it emerged from that 1953 modernization program, but it was too expensive. So, after looking around I decided to use the paint scheme the Milwaukee Road used when the engine was donated. This yellow and red scheme was inspired by the Union Pacific and was adopted very late in the engine's career (mid-50's). Also, the number board in front (and rear) should say "E2" in printed 1 x 1 tiles. The loco is split in three sections as per the original engine. The front and rear section can pivot slightly to make the engine go around curves. The wheels are jointed to the frame at the three wheel segments, with a center section all by itself. The swinging three axle design is by Anthony Sava. Here is Steve's original model from 1999. ...and here is my ldd file: LDD file for the electric loco Comments, Questions and complaints welcome! EDITED 10/16/16: Added new pictures and updated ldd file to the main post.
  4. The GG-1 was a class of electric locomotives built for the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) for use in the northeastern United States. 139 GG-1s were constructed by General Electric and PRR's Altoona Works from 1934 to 1943, although mine is used by Brick Railway Systems on the New York - Chicago route. The real GG-1"s never traveled that far west in service, due to the overhead wires ending at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The GG-1's served under the PRR, then Penn Central, and onto Conrail and Amtrak, until finally a few went to New Jersey Transit, with some of these units served from 1935 on the PRR to to retiring with NJ transit in 1983. The model seen here is painted in this fictional Brick Railway Systems blue and red color scheme. This means the engine will be pulling some stretched 1980's style passenger car painted like the ones in sets 7715 / 7718. Unlike my previous model of a GG-1, this one has no interior details. The engine features moving panto-graphs for picking up (imaginary) electricity from the overhead wires. They are both in the raised position here, though normally the one opposite the direction of travel would be used. The exception to this was if the rear panto-graph was knocked off or damaged by overhanging debris, which the engine would then have it's lead panto-graph raised in order to limp the the repair shop. The loco features Anthony Sava's sliding middle axle design. This means the middle axle out of the three on the bogie closest to the middle of the loco slide laterally back and forth to allow the engine over switches and curves that would be normally to tight to maneuver. These special bogies are used twice of course: one for each half of the loco. The two outer wheels closest to each end are connected to the inner bogies via cup-and-ball parts. This allows them to swing freely and not bind up while still representing the right amount of wheels for a GG-1 loco. The coaches this engine will pull are inspired by train sets 7715 / 7718 from the 4.5 Volt era in the early to mid 1980's. The doors should be printed like these: http://alpha.brickli...Color=5#T=C&C=5 and http://alpha.brickli...e?P=4182p05#T=C I already have 75% of the parts for this model, including all but one door. Here is the LDD file for the engine by itself: http://www.moc-pages...1461783587m.lxf ...and here is one with the coaches and engine: http://www.moc-pages...1461783797m.lxf According to a Facebook comment made to my post on the LEGO Train Fan Club page, the engine I built look similar to this bi-centennial Conrail-era unit: Comments, complaints and questions are always welcome! (This page will be revised again when the cars are built In Real Life.) Recently, I discovered this neat website on the GG-1's, called the GG-1 homepage, which was last updated in 2002. It features some cool stuff and hard to find info though so here is the link: http://www.spikesys.com/GG1/
  5. Hi train lovers. I open this topic to present to You and promote my Italian locomotive E326. Italian Locomotive Class E326 by Cristiano Grassi, su Flickr More than one year ago I launched it on Lego Ideas (here is the link if You want to support the project https://ideas.lego.com/projects/134535) as a digital project. It ends its first year with 279 supports. Bad result. But during this year I was ordering the parts from Bricklink to build the locomotive. So I decided to relaunch the project. It takes 252 supports in 15 days. A better start. I build it with some changes because some parts are very difficult to find and some don't exist in the colors that I need. And yes, I've Painted the Windows because I want this type on the locomotive. Lego Ideas allows submitting existing parts in new colors. I normally don't paint Lego. (And this is an opportunity to have them in reddish brown) My english is not good, so here are some photos.. Italian Locomotive Class E326 by Cristiano Grassi, su Flickr Italian Locomotive Class E326 by Cristiano Grassi, su Flickr Italian Locomotive Class E326 by Cristiano Grassi, su Flickr Italian Locomotive Class E326 by Cristiano Grassi, su Flickr Italian Locomotive Class E326 by Cristiano Grassi, su Flickr Italian Locomotive Class E326 by Cristiano Grassi, su Flickr Italian Locomotive Class E326 by Cristiano Grassi, su Flickr The locomotive is made with 670 parts. It runs good on curves, but it's not motorized. I know I'm a beginner with trains and surely not an expert like the most on this forum, but I've try to do my best here. And I know Ideas probably will never produce a locomotive, but many supports can encourage Lego to produce new locomotives. You can see complete photo gallery here https://www.flickr.c...s/vedosololego/ I hope You like and support this and my other projects on Ideas. Thanks
  6. Hi everyone. This is my version of the SBB CE 6/8 Electric Locomotive, called the Swiss Crocodile. I try to represent it as much realistic and detailed as i can. By now it's only a digital project. I hope i can build it really in future. It is also a Lego Ideas project, so if you really like it you can support following the link. https://ideas.lego.com/projects/97696 Your support on this project and your comments would be greatly appreciated. Thanks to all.