Daedalus304

Eurobricks Citizen
  • Content count

    322
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Daedalus304

  • Birthday 03/28/1990

Spam Prevention

  • What is favorite LEGO theme? (we need this info to prevent spam)
    Trains

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    New Mexico

Extra

  • Country
    USA
  • Special Tags 1
    http://www.eurobricks.com/forum/style_images/tags/LDD_builder_yellow.gif

Recent Profile Visitors

1703 profile views
  1. Daedalus304

    Motorized 5L bogie

    The red plates on the bottom might not be necessary under light loads, but I've always liked to fortify my gear trains as much as possible personally. One thing to note is that with plates under the technic bricks like that, you're not going to be able to make it past switches or crossovers without swapping out the stock traction bands for some thicker O-Rings to give you an extra mm or two of height. Of course, you get better traction that way too, so it could be seen as a win all around. :D And yeah, 2711 is a really awesome piece that hasn't been made in quite a while. Very useful in some situations though!
  2. Daedalus304

    Motorized 5L bogie

    I made this a few years back, and it's very strong. Basically you build around the motor so that the whole motor works as a pivot. The outermost 5-L Technic half lift arm should actually be this part: http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItem.asp?P=2711 With a little tinkering you can use other motors instead of an XL-Motor if you really want. This was actually a derivative of a motor bogie used by BMW_Indy in either his Wild West or Circus Train using an M-motor, which was itself a derivative of Space2310's version which was narrow gauge! So it's pretty well-traveled design.
  3. Daedalus304

    AT&SF #2926 - 4-8-4 Steam Locomotive

    Thank you! The powered stand came about because I don't have much ability to set up my track outside of shows any more, and my most of the displays my LUG does don't have room for a big loop of track. I really like the way the motion turned out and wanted to be able to see it in action more often than once or twice a year, so, I built the powered stand! The other thing I like about it is that for shows out here in ABQ, my #2926 model has always sort of the attention-getter among the LEGO locos since they're restoring it. Having a self-powered display stand is great for that since I can have #2926 "running" on the stand even if it needs to be recharged or if we want to run some other locos on the main lines. I do not have a sound unit yet - that's something that is planned for a later update when I get enough spare money. The hope is to upgrade the loco later with a PFx Bluetooth unit so I can try out the PFx speaker. The other big thing keeping me back from that is that I'm not sure where to get the right sound files for #2926. I do also want to look into getting a fan-driven smoke unit at some point to get the smoke chuffs synced up to the wheels - I don't know how expensive or complicated any of that will be, but I've got a few other projects I'd like to take care of first before I delve into the "V3.5" upgrade. It would seem that, like real locomotives, there's always changes to be rolled out from the factory. :D Yeah, I'm not sure if all the Boxpoks will be like that though. A friend bought a set of them very early this year/late last year and they were so loose they don't want to stay on the axle, but every set we've bought the since I got these the axles have been too tight. Either way there's solutions, of course, but I'm not sure the variances in printing will always be the same. And finally, no, the builder's plates are not blank, they actually have text perfectly matching the real builder's plate. The problem is that for some reason the background of the builders plate stickers were printed gray and not black, so it's hard to see the detail and even moreso in the sunlight. I will probably look into getting these re-printed soon, but I've got a show next weekend and want to wait until after that. Speaking of the show... I'll be getting some good video of it hauling my new passenger car consist. 11 feet of LEGO train. :D I'll definitely post those videos here, so keep an eye out. Best of luck! :D I hope it helps.
  4. Daedalus304

    AT&SF #2926 - 4-8-4 Steam Locomotive

    Thank you! It's always my hope that the non-LEGO bits don't detract from the LEGO build. I've seen instances where the non-lego parts, or sheer amount of stickers wrapping a build, really distracted me from what was actually a pretty good build underneath. I'm glad that these extra features don't ruin it for you, it feels like a tricky balance some times! It's true, if LEGO made these parts, I would of course use the real LEGO version. I understand of course why they don't - the impression I've got is that LEGO Trains as a theme nowadays really is just profitable enough to do what they're doing and not much more. So, I understand that they're going to limit the amount of train-specific parts that they produce. From that perspective, I try to do as much of the build as purist as I can. The shaping, the functionality, I want the soul to be LEGO. For things like rods and drivers, I'm very lucky to see that the people who are custom producing these understand the feel and the soul of LEGO part design, or at least their understanding aligns with mine. These parts feel like they could be LEGO parts, and I don't feel like they're overspecialized. I think that if LEGO were to produce drive rods, they'd look very much like Benn's. If LEGO were to produce XXL drivers, they'd look very much like Shupp's. If LEGO were to produce a train set like this and have printed parts with a Safety Tread design, I think it wouldn't be far from what OKBrickworks has made for me. To me, even though I know I'm breaking real LEGO "purism", I feel like this is still within the spirit of the endeavor - though I'm perfectly aware and fine that many might disagree. Things like the Brickstuff lights and the smoke generator are perhaps outside of this ethos a bit. But those... well, heck, they're just so cool I don't care.
  5. Daedalus304

    BR51-761-5 (Octrainber 2018)

    Haha, well, perhaps some day we will have to find a way to trade designs Wow, that's really interesting! It seems odd to me that the railroad would overlook maintaining these cabins but keep the rest of the tender water tight - I assume, anyways, that if any other spots of the tender were to develop leaks of that sort they would repair them rather readily. I wonder if the maintenance was overlooked by crews intentionally as an excuse to get out of them? Either way, it's a very neat idea and it's really cool to see it here on this model. Thanks for the information!
  6. Daedalus304

    [MOD] Darth Vader Brickheadz Inzide

    You know, I've really never liked Brickheads. Just the concept of them, really. But, I really like the idea of modifying them to be able to fit a minifig inside of it. If I ever do end up with any Brickheads, I'll definitely do this. It's sort of like a nesting doll sort of feel to it, which is way more fun.
  7. Daedalus304

    BR51-761-5 (Octrainber 2018)

    Another very well-built Locomotive! Your German Locomotive builds always make me think that I'd like to have one too someday. I'm really interested in the secondary cab on the tender. I don't suppose you could tell us more about that? I've never seen or heard of such a thing!
  8. Daedalus304

    AT&SF #2926 - 4-8-4 Steam Locomotive

    Okay, I've finally found the time to put this together: This isn't exactly how it was done, but it's a decent enough approximation. The upper half directly on the frame with the motor has been how I've had the motors situated for several years now and it's never had a problem, so it's sturdy and reliable. 2926 has this set up for both trucks, so even though my tender is enormous it is quite full. When it came time for Version 3, I felt like I still had more raw torque than I was using. In fact, thanks to the LEGO coupling magnets being a little weak, it was more torque than I could make use of. The 2900s were very quick engines, so I played around with trading some of the wasted strength for speed. This has worked pretty dang well so far. One other thing to note is that the train wheels on the geared axles have aftermarket O-rings on them replacing the stock LEGO traction tires. These are necessary for this as they provide enough clearance for the bottom plates on the chassis, and the unpowered center wheels are lifted enough out of the rail that they won't bind in turns. Thank you! I spent a lot of time watching reviews of Lionel and MTH O-gauge models and did my best to try to match what details I could. I think that's helped me a lot. Thanks!
  9. Daedalus304

    AT&SF #2926 - 4-8-4 Steam Locomotive

    I haven't had to use glue yet, but I've sure been tempted a couple times before. Perhaps in the future I'll try to 3D print a LEGO compatible stack to insert a smoke unit in. As for your "off-topic" section.... I think you're correct, and I think I had a misunderstanding. I'm not very familiar with the LGB system and didn't know that was the reason some were 1:32 and some were 1:22.5. You're definitely more knowledgeable on that subject than I am. Thank you for teaching me!
  10. Daedalus304

    AT&SF #2926 - 4-8-4 Steam Locomotive

    They're pretty large, but I'm not sure quite large enough for a Spinner! At least, not at 1/48th. 2926's drivers were 80 inches across, or about 6 1/3 feet. As best as I remember the 4-2-2 engine's giant drivers were around 8 or 9 feet! Perhaps an XXXL would do the trick. Also, thanks! Steam locomotive motion has always really mesmerized me. Thank you very much! I'm glad I explained things alright, I always get worried I'm not doing so good at that. You know, though, I remember now when I was running v2 of 2926 at a train show last November, there was one of the model railroader guys who'd been looking at it for a while, asking questions, and after a few minutes he asked how much it had cost - I told him, and he looked at it, shook his head, and said "Not worth it" and walked away. I was lost for words at the time, but it kind of amuses me now. I certainly haven't had him in mind as I've built the new version, but I can't help but wonder if this version would change his mind. Of course! I hope you get to try some out! Ah, well, yes, technically I suppose that's true, but I'm not really worried about that. Even in O-gauge and other traditional model model railroading, the track gauge will often be too wide for the locomotives running on it (If I remember correctly, O-gauge track is actually a couple millimeters too wide for 1/48, and there are plenty of 1/35th engines for LGB track which should be 1/22.5). The other thing of course, is that with the size of this locomotive, building it any larger would have brought some tremendous difficulties. For example, XXL drivers wouldn't be near big enough for 1/38th, and I have serious doubts a loco of this size at 1/38th would be able to survive Lego's tight, tight curves and switches. I'm very glad to hear you like it despite this scale problem! As for the wheels, well, they've been a lot sturdier than I'd ever have expected. When I first got them, the axle holes were quite tight and it was difficult to put the axles in. I pressed down very hard on these wheels to try and get them in to little avail, and I can't say the wheels seem to have suffered at all for it. It was surely several times as much pressure as the wheels would get under any normal use, and on their weakest approach (From the flat side, not the rim like they're intended). I think it's very safe to say that there are no concerns about the robust-ness of these wheels, I don't see these ever breaking from even rough usage. As for the issue of getting the axles to fit, I learned - don't force them in. It's best to carefully scrape out the axle hole with a sharp hobby knife until the axle goes in.
  11. Daedalus304

    AT&SF #2926 - 4-8-4 Steam Locomotive

    Wow, thank you so much, I feel very honored by your words. The things you say you've seen in the video, elegance, strength, pride, to me those are the words that define a steam engine. And it's always fascinated me to watch them, the way they move and work - and I really wanted to try and capture that elegance in the motion. It's really hard to get it in a medium like LEGO, and it's really easy to make it still look crude... to be honest, it's a relief to hear that it seems to have mostly worked! And of course, again, I couldn't have ever gotten to this point on my own. The community is awesome, both the people who create these custom items and the people who've used those items in inspiring ways. Thank you very much, again. Thank you both! Oh, well then, let me show you this wonderful little Shapeways Page! Shupp's got tons of driver/wheel designs up there that you buy straight from Shapeways. They're very sturdy and definitely feel up to the job. The spacing of the wheels is 7 holes total, so you have 1 with an axle, 5 empty holes, and then another axle. So for just axles you'd need a 1x8 technic brick. Thank you!! Haha, I feel the same way every single time I see one of your MOCs. I don't know if I've been able to stuff in half the detail on here that you get on your locomotives. Thank you very much for your kind words. So the Seuthe #5... is definitely bulky. Back when I built the original model, I - purists, look away - may have drilled out the centers of two 2x2 Round Bricks and one hole in a 2x8 technic plate, and fit the Seuthe through that. To keep in supported in place, underneath the Seuthe #5 I ran the wires through a 2x4 Technic Plate and built a support for it out of bricks. That keeps it pretty securely in place. So for v3, I just kept that how it was and brought it over. 3 modified parts didn't seem too bad, all things considered. For the electronics side of it, I used a half a PF Extension cord and wired it into the C1/C2 lines with a resistor to get the voltage correct. I have to give out a very thankful shout-out to Philohome for all the extensive documentation of the PF system that made this possible for someone as electrically ignorant as I am. Hi! I'm afraid I'm not sure what you mean about the scale not being the 1:38? It is 1:48th scale, within a 1-plate margin anyways. The 3D printed drivers generally are pretty black looking, but their texture is a lot rougher than LEGO is due to the 3D printing. Indoors, it's not a big difference - but out in the bright sunlight, you can see, the rough surface catches a lot more light. The wheels on the real 2926 are a bit more of a "gray-black" than the black of the engine, so, I'm content for now with the way it looks on the model. I haven't had an opportunity yet to run the battery through a full, timed cycle since I modified the gearing and got all the lights added in, but generally I've gotten 3.5-4 hours I think off the box. I don't expect it'll change much. I don't have any pictures of the motor assembly, but if I can find 15 minutes to dink around in LDD I can recreate the assembly and show you. I'll try to get to that soon. Thank you! At first when I was still working on the model and it was all torn apart, I'd look back at pictures of the original one and think "What have I done?!", but now that it's finished and I see them side-by-side, I agree, the first one doesn't come close. I'm very glad I tore it apart As for the wheels on your Big Boy, well, that's not really a problem now is it? Except maybe for your budget. If you ever do that, I'd love to see it. Thank you very much!!
  12. Hello! Today I'd like to share my newest LEGO locomotive - AT&SF's #2926. Some of you who have been here for a while may remember that I have posted a build of this locomotive before, 4 and a half years ago. Since February, I've been completely re-designing and updating the model from the ground up, and I'm really excited to have finally completed it. A quick history - #2926 was one of the last group of steam passenger locomotives built for AT&SF in 1944. The 2900 class of Locomotives were the heaviest of the 4-8-4s built in the United States, weighing in at just shy of 1 Million pounds when fully loaded with water and oil, and they were also among the largest Northerns ever built as well. In the 9 years it was originally in service, #2926 logged over 1 million miles of both Passenger and Fast Freight service. In 1956, #2926 was donated to the city of Albuquerque, NM and it was placed on static exhibit in Coronado Park. In 1999, the New Mexico Steam Locomotive and Railroad Historic Society purchased #2926 from the city for $1, and began putting into motion a full restoration of the engine with the intention of having it running again. This restoration is now very nearly completed and the engine is expected to be back in service next year. Anybody who is interested in the restoration can check out their website, http://www.nmslrhs.org/, and I heartily recommend going through their 15-year photo history showing the progress. My model of #2926 has a lot of really cool features and interesting building techniques I'd like to show and explain, but first I'll just do a quick overview. #2926 is powered by 2 XL Motors in the tender, each geared up 40:24 for some extra speed. In my testing the last 5 years, 2 XL motors has had more torque than I could make use of - so even with sacrificing some of that strength for speed, this engine is still incredibly strong. I've used some 3D printed XXL Boxpok Drivers designed by Shupp, as well as Benn Coifman's rods. The decals were made for me by OKBrickworks, who do some fantastic work - including something especially cool that you'll see in some other pictures. This engine is also fully lit using a total of 9 of Brickstuff's LEDs, and with some help from my dad I've also got a smoke unit installed (A Seuthe #5). The engine+tender are just shy of 100 studs in length. I've designed it primarily with r56+ in mind for "ideal" running, but it will take an R40 curve. The experience is not dissimilar to this video, but it will make it. Luckily for me, a friend owns a 1/48th TruScale model of a 2900 locomotive, and the real #2926's restoration site is only a half hour away. Between the two, I was blessed to have probably the best reference material I could have asked for, and it really pushed me to try to build the most accurate, nearly-perfectly 1/48th scaled Lego Locomotive I could. The first thing that's probably caught your attention is the safety tread on all the walkways. This was a custom design I had the guys at OKBrickworks make for me, and I think they did a great job. I spent a lot of time this year watching video reviews of O-Gauge models on Youtube, and one of the things that caught my eye was the pattern of the safety tread on the walkways. To me, it helps break up the endless, shiny blackness and give some more definition and detail. This is also my first time using the technique of 1x1 Tile with Clips to hold on the running boards. In the past when I'd tried it the clips were always too mushy, or brittle, and the tiles were always held in at a bit of a slant I couldn't stand. Then, this revision of the clip piece came to my attention. It suffers none of the issues I'd had with the tiles-in-clips methods I'd had before, so I definitely recommend using that version of the clip. In addition to the OKBrickworks decals, I've also used a little yellow vinyl inside the headlight to keep it shining bright (The black plastic was absorbing a lot of the light), and some black vinyl on the tops of the Light Gray slopes to keep the boiler jacket black and avoid a "collar" at the front. Moving back along the top of the engine, there's a lot to see here that isn't so obvious from other views. Both the Bell and Whistle have each their own ropes running along back into the cab, and you can easily see the size and shape of the sand dome. The interesting apparatus you see around the funnel is a special device 2926 was equipped with that adjusted the height of the stack - raising and lowering it depending on available clearance and, on open lines, letting them fine-tune the amount of draft. This view also highlights what I feel is one of the defining details of my model of 2926 - just like the real engine, the boiler enlarges towards the middle. Here, you can clearly see the diameter is wider behind the sand dome than it is in front of it. The sides of the boiler expand by an entire plate on each side, and I've done everything I could to keep this expansion smooth and seamless and avoid the 'stepped' feeling. This made the build a lot more complex than usual, and the Sand Dome became a very interesting component to have to build as it had to fully fill a very unconventional gap. Lining it up just right between everything, and then also attaching the number boards, took a lot of weird approaches. For example, if you noticed the 1/2 plate gaps on the front and back of the dome and are curious how they've been filled in - you may be surprised to learn that I used this tail rudder. Moving further back you can see the Steam Dome and the pop-off valves, the dynamo, and all the pipework. Of note here is that the last 8 studs along the sides of the boiler also gently slope inwards, this time a half a plate between the cab and the front of the firebox. The top of this area has some of the 'stepped' look I tried to avoid, but I couldn't find a way around it that fit everything I wanted and needed. My cab roof has the hatches and their rails, though non-functional. I realize that there's been a really lovely advancement in cab roofs made over the last year, that I first noticed on Cale Leiphart's amazing Blue Comet Locomotive. I've considered a few times trying to reverse engineer that technique, but for a variety of reasons (Structural/hatches/time) I've decided to stick with my now-antiquated design. The running gear has also been significantly altered from my old version, with more complete valve gear and more accurate motion than I'd had before. These XXL Boxpoks look fantastic, and I really appreciated that there were multiple sizes of counterweight available so I could go just that extra little inch of detail. One thing to make note of is that the drivers are not rigidly attached to the locomotive - The engine pivots off a technic pin over the 2nd axle, and in the back pivots off the trailing truck. This means that there is a very narrow and carefully adjusted seam between the drivers and the boiler to allow enough freedom of motion for the chassis to rotate enough to navigate R40 curves - a very, very tricky balance. I've got a video of the wheels and gear in motion, here: Now, for those of you who are remembering when I said this engine was powered by 2 XL motors in the tender, and finding the above a little contradictory - I build a special stand for #2926 that has an M-Motor in the base. There are some supports between the drivers that hold the locomotive just barely off the rails, and an geared axle from the stand powered by the M-Motor interfaces with a gear on the 2nd set of drivers. This lets me run the locomotive's motion while on otherwise static display, which is super fun. Moving on, here you can see the rear of the engine and again, there's a lot going on. The sides of the firebox slope inwards as on the real locomotive, from 9-wide at the bottom to about 7 by time it meets with the boiler. Once again inspired by O-Gauge locomotive reviews, #2926 is equipped with a drop plate to bridge the gap between the engine and the tender. Thanks to the tightness of even R56 curves, I had an issue with the drop plate colliding with the tender through S-bends and causing some trouble. To rectify that, the drop plate has been put on a bar and can slide left and right so that it won't cause any issues when the tender needs to push it a little. The springs are sadly a bit of an eyesore, but for now necessary - they keep the drop plate perfectly centered when it's not being moved. I needed an incredibly soft and gentle spring to keep this from causing trouble, and unfortunately out of all the springs I've found and tried so far these were the only ones soft enough. So, yes, they are too big in diameter for now, but they'll do until I find the perfect spring. Also in this photo you can see some wires sticking out of the cab. These are for the smoke unit and the lights, that I'll be showing more of later. Now, not many of my photos of the tender turned out super well, so hopefully you'll be able to bear with me with what I did get. The biggest point of interest on the tender is the detail put into the shaping and positioning of the Fuel Bunker. On the real #2926's tender, the fuel bunker has a small but noticeable gap between it and the tender walls. It also sits a couple inches lower than the tender walls and the water tank section. It took a very long time to get it figured out, but as you can see, there is indeed a noticeable gap between the fuel bunker and the walls of the tender, and the top of the bunker is inset a half a plate lower. To the rear of the bunker, you'll also see that the Wall Panel Corners wrap around the back of the bunker too, to prevent a rather unsightly gap that would've been there had the wall panels just run right up to the curved bricks. This all meant that securing this bunker top was a nightmare - a half a plate lower, a half a plate more forwards, and it's an 8-wide section of paneling in a 9-wide tender build. Somehow in the end it all worked out, and the top of the bunker is securely attached, by studs no less. One section of the panel isn't attached, and that's the access hatch for the battery, that's held in place by friction. Using the thin tail-end of the modern orange brick separator, it's easily removed and I can turn the battery on and off and charge it as needed. It really, really amuses me that the charge port of the battery is almost perfectly underneath the hatch for pouring in more oil. On the far left, you can see that weird old hinged bar sitting there. That's there as an approximation of the tool the crew would use to open the oil/water hatches. It's a bit large to scale, but it's fun to have and the Minifigs pose well with it. The back of the tender does have the prototypical lettering, but the bulkiness of the ladder obscures it a bit. For those curious, the text above reads: 7170 G.O.S-858 24500 G.W Which is, 24,500 gallons of water and 7,170 gallons of oil. From everything I've been able to find online, #2926's tender may actually have been the largest tender ever constructed. If you check through the restoration photos of #2926 at the website I linked earlier, they actually have pictures of people climbing around inside the water tank scrubbing out scale - and also some pictures of a crane lifting out the fuel bunker. It's really, really cool to see. Okay, now the home stretch. I've got some fun features to show off: When I said this engine was fully lit, I meant it. The headlight and the marker lights are lit, but also you may notice the number boards are lit up as well. I'll go more into those soon. The firebox also has an LED inside of it, which lights up the cab and, with the help of a little aluminum foil lining my firebox (Because, again, the black plastic just soaked up all the light), you can see the locomotive also features an ash pan glow. The tender also features a reversing light that only lights up when the engine is driving in reverse, as you can see in this video: Okay, now on to the number boards. Okay, so, the number boards. These were made using White 2/3 Slopes ("Cheese slopes") with Brickstuff lights inside them. Because of the variations in LEGO's white and different densities of plastics, it was actually a little bit harder than I expected to find 4 white slopes with the matching transparencies. The number faces themselves are on a transparent vinyl, printed black with the numbers left as unprinted "blank spots". The LED lights up the the white slopes just enough that the light shines through the numbers, but none of the black vinyl. I had really hoped that it would turn out this way, but until I got my decals from OK Brickworks and applied them and the vinyl there was no way to know for sure - but I think they turned out really nicely. The last picture I'd like to show here is this, a comparison between my original #2926 from 2014 and the 2018 version: Back when I build the original model, I'd hoped that some day XXL drivers would be available. Shupp's 3D printed XXL drivers were more than I could have hoped for, and thus kicked off the "2926 v3 Project" back in February. When I started, I'd really only thought that I would make some minor adjustments to my then-current v2, which was basically v1 with some slightly better details and the chassis was reworked to no longer be rigid. v2's wheelbase articulation was the same as v3's is now. At first, I'd really just planned to elongate the boiler to make room for the larger drivers. But, then I got ambitious. A friend had a 1/48th TruScale model that he let me use as a reference, and the restoration of the real 2926 had finally reached a point where the locomotive was mostly intact and no longer strewn about the site. I saw an opportunity to fix all the details and shapes that were wrong before, and I leaped upon it. Realizing how close in size my model was to the 1/48th O-scale model only fueled the madness, really, and that was the point where I went for the huge goal of the expanding boiler. It wasn't a simple update anymore - I had a whole new build. 9 months later, I think it's finally done. There's a few things I'd like to add in the future, but for now, I'm satisfied with it, and I hope you all enjoy it. If you would like to see more pictures of my model of #2926, you can take a look at the Flickr album. If you're really keen to take a stroll down memory lane, here's the album for my original model. as well as the original Eurobricks topic. I add these because I find it fascinating to look at the old version and think, when I first built that, it was the best build I could achieve. 4 years has made a huge difference, and not just in my personal ability, but also the amazing support that the Lego Train community has built for itself. Custom rods, 3D printed drivers, amazing custom stickers, Lego-compatible lighting options - all of these wonderful things enrich our hobby. I'm really excited to see what the next 4 years brings. Thank you for your time!
  13. Daedalus304

    Unauthorized selling of instructions for MOCs

    There are a couple ways. Taking screenshots manually every few parts additions, there is a program called Blueprint that you can find in the LDD Forum, or you can just generate LDD's "Instructions" and sell off that garbled mess. Almost always, these poachers just sell you the LDD file and call that "Instructions". From the one video I've seen from this particular offender, I'm strongly inclined to believe it's either the LDD Generated instructions or just a raw LXF file that he was selling.
  14. Daedalus304

    Unauthorized selling of instructions for MOCs

    Sure. The majority of the content was stolen work. If he feels like his own work is strong enough and valuable enough to gain that many subscribers on his own merit he should be able to build it back up again - but with how muddy the waters get in things like this, detaching from the shady poaching that's defined the channel is probably best for everybody in the long run. Youtube fans aren't going to lose interest in the subject matter just because one video maker has left, they'll just go find someone else who offers comparable content - and with any luck they'll find someone who runs their channel with integrity and doesn't poach. I think that's also best for everybody. Interesting there was an open call for LXF files to be submitted and no mention of "By the way, I'm going to try to sell your work and keep all the proceeds for myself".
  15. Daedalus304

    Unauthorized selling of instructions for MOCs

    If these "Instructions" are on the same level of quality as every other MOC Poacher out there who steals other people's work, it's probably literally just the LXF file. On top of the ridiculousness of charging money for somebody else's free work, I can't even begin agree that simply redistributing another person's free LXF file constitutes enough work to skim off a full 50% of whatever is being charged. If the MOC Poacher actually had the skill to put time and effort into making REAL instructions I could see an argument for wanting a portion of the proceeds, but even THAT should only be done with explicit permission. It's not a generational thing. Thieves and scoundrels of all sort have been doing this since long before any modern country existed. As long as there are hard-working, talented people to make things, there are poachers and opportunists there to swipe the credit and take the money on their behalf. I remember not too long ago some guy came here posting one of Zephyr's fantastic EMD units as his own, also selling it and literally dozens of other poached MOCs from members of EB as well as Brickshelf and MOC Pages. My recommendation is that if you see your own, or somebody else's, work being blatantly poached and monetized, bring it to the attention of the mods/admins.