Hod Carrier

Eurobricks Knights
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About Hod Carrier

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    <p> Lego trains. </p> <p> Speed Champions Mustang. </p>

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    Good ol' U of K

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  1. Hod Carrier

    Powered Up Lithium DIY

    Alternatively you could simply solder a PP3 battery connector onto the opposite end of the PF power lead, being careful to correctly observe polarity as described above. This was the technique used for the now seemingly defunct MiniZip cable. The required space for the PP3 battery with connector and cable running over the top has a footprint of 4x7 studs and a height of 7 plates.
  2. Hod Carrier

    Powered Up Lithium DIY

    Are these batteries safe for novice use? In other words, do they have the necessary protections against mishap built-in?
  3. Hod Carrier

    When Do You Order A MOC?

    Spot on. One other thing I do is not to specify the colour of parts that will remain hidden inside the build. It makes it easier to use up unused parts you might have left over and to take advantage of buying parts at lower prices.
  4. Hod Carrier

    When Do You Order A MOC?

    Amen to that. One tip that I've learned is to keep one eye on Bricklink during the design process. Not all parts are available in all colours and some parts that show as being available turn out to be rare and, therefore, expensive. You can also check to see whether or not the parts you need are available in your territory or at least nearby. With this information you can make better choices about the parts you can use and tailor your design accordingly, avoiding the use of non-existent, unavailable or excessively expensive parts. Ordering parts from other EU states shouldn't be a big problem, although they can sometimes take longer to arrive. Just adjust the Store Filters to take out any vendors outside of the EU area where postage and other fees may inflate the cost. If you're building in Stud.io, take some time to do some good quality renders of your design to get a better idea how it will look when completed. I always build my MOCs digitally first and I find that rendering them gives a much better impression and I can make a better decision about whether or not I'm happy with the design or if it still requires tweaking. If you've any unusual design elements that you are unsure will work in real life, try prototyping the technique with some table-scraps to see how it works and make any changes before committing. It can pay not to rush to Bricklink with credit card in your trembling hands until you're absolutely 100% happy with how it looks, but you will have to accept that you are almost always going to have to come back for more parts because some aspect didn't work out quite as you'd hoped. When it comes to uploading your design to Bricklink I would recommend that you cross-check the parts list Bricklink has generated against the parts list in your Stud.io file. I have found that sometimes they don't match as Bricklink has been known to miss things off. If you use it, it can also sometimes be worth running the "Auto-Select" function a few times because sometimes it compiles the parts differently which can sometimes affect the total cost.
  5. Hod Carrier

    [MOC] CIE CC1

    If only that was a category in the Brick Train Awards.
  6. Hod Carrier

    [MOC] CIE CC1

    Thank you, Davide. Yes she's a it of a mess, but then she was designed for practicality rather than aesthetics. The history that I have provided at the top of this thread is really just a basic summary, but it covers most of the important details. More information about her can be found in various places online, such as the Bulleid locos website. They should consider themselves lucky I haven't provided them with a fireman's pole, suitably greased of course. Ha ha!! I've got you properly hooked now. It's funny, but the more I search the more confusing it gets. I have found sources saying that the water tanks and turf bunkers were at opposite ends and others saying that they were at both ends as you describe, a bit like a Fairlie but with just one boiler. The problem now is that there is nothing left of the loco to point to to get a definitive answer. Dividing the fuel and water storage between the ends complicates matters as it requires replication of technical features, such as the augers for feeding the boiler with turf, and complicates fueling and watering, but that doesn't mean that it wasn't so. The history that I have presented up-thread is intended to be an introduction only and has been drawn from a number of online sources, the accuracy of which I cannot vouch for. I think that the technical cutaway is correct, as it appears to be a reproduction of a technical drawing shown in this thread on the Irish Railway Modeller forum. Sadly the images posted there are not very distinct but enough can be ascertained to verify that they are the same drawings.
  7. Hod Carrier

    [MOC] English Electric GT3

    Thank you for the wonderful feedback. The quoted fuel consumption figure for GT3 at full power was 0.635lb/hp/hr, which is not an everyday measure of consumption, while consumption at idle was 20% of this. The designer, J.O.P. Hughes, admitted that GT3's fuel efficiency was not regarded as good enough as it suffers from the same issue that afflicted the previous two gas turbine prototypes, which is that a gas turbine is most efficient when it is working at full power. Thermal efficiency for the unit powering GT3 was 22% at full power dropping to 17% at half power. This is a disadvantage for railway use because trains are often driven on a partial throttle. However, all three of these prototypes were using what might charitably be referred to as 1st generation gas turbines and that advances in gas turbine technology could have yielded better thermal efficiency with it's consequent improvement in fuel consumption. The railways in the UK didn't see another gas turbine until the experimental APT-E of the 1970s, but this used a different approach. Instead of one large gas turbine, APT-E used a total of eight smaller gas turbines so that the effect of partial throttle could be replicated by using only the number of turbines required at full throttle to generate the amount of power needed for propelling the train. Thank you, Davide. I must admit that I am a fan of the way it looks too. It's futuristic but in a restrained manner befitting the British temperament. It's certain that GT3 is not very well known, even within the UK. I had no idea until I chanced on a photo of it at the Institute of Locomotive Engineers exhibition at Marylebone in London and thought "what is that?!" Once I'd done some research and found more images and a history I decided that I just had to build it.
  8. Hod Carrier

    [MOC] English Electric GT3

    @Pdaitabird Thank you so much.
  9. Hod Carrier

    [MOC] Westbahn Stadler Kiss 2

    Wowser!! Now THAT'S a proper train. Congratulations on such an amazing build and on making it possible to run on standard LEGO track geometry. I just wanted to say that you don't need a pole reverser switch if you're using an SBrick, as you can reverse the direction of the output from individual ports within the SBrick app.
  10. Hod Carrier

    [MOC] CIE CC1

    Yes, definitely. In common with the Leader class, CC1 was designed to have the same flexibility of operation as would be afforded by a conventional tank engine or a double-ended diesel. As such, terms like "front" and "back" are meaningless. In normal railway parlance, you would refer to either #1 or #2 end (or perhaps A or B). During my research I was able to dig up a technical cutaway of CC1 in a German language publication that showed the internal layout (follow the link and scroll up a bit). This indicated that the water tank and turf bunker were at opposite ends of the loco. The inset steps on the side are, as far as I can discern, at the water tank end. The images you've linked to represent most of the sources I had available to use. By referencing the differences caused by the asymmetry of the loco you can see that, although you can see both ends, you only ever see one side. The image of the roof is only of a model though, so I've had to treat it with caution. I have included centrally positioned safety valves and vents for the blowers at each end based on the cutaway referred to above, and the two chimneys by reference to images of the loco in steam. However, it's all still best guess as clearly there must be some other features up there, such as a means of accessing the turf bunker to facilitate fueling. I shall be seeking further clarification on both of these matters. I do get your point and I know exactly what you mean. Modelling in LEGO is a balancing act between what looks right and what is achievable, and regrettably the need to make this ladder part suitable for those wretched Minifigs does mean that it ends up massively out-of-scale in this instance. However, I do prefer the look of your custom alternative and am likely to be in touch with an order in due course.
  11. Hod Carrier

    [MOC] English Electric GT3

    Go for it, my friend. You're most welcome. Thank you for the kind words.
  12. Hod Carrier

    [MOC] English Electric GT3

    Thanks everyone for the kind words. Yes I believe so. It's 3mm rigid hose bought through Bricklink, so I'm assuming it's an official part. I did have to heat it slightly over a flame to get the 90 degree bend, though.
  13. Hod Carrier

    [MOC] CIE CC1

    Thank you everyone for the amazing feedback. Wow!! That would be great. I'd love to. Yes, that's the front. Oh wait, hang on. Er... No, the rear. Probably. It is funny you should say that because there was something I forgot to mention. All the images I have found online for this loco seem to show the same side, so I've had to assume that the other side is a mirror image. Like the moon, CC1 has always hidden her "dark side". If anyone knows whether this assumption is incorrect I shall be happy to hear and to make the necessary corrections. The ladder piece is definitely horrible and I'd rather not have to use it at all. The problem is that it's right on the very front of the loco (Or is it? See above), and therefore a fairly prominent feature which I couldn't really delete. The techniques you've shown are certainly much better, but sadly won't work on this build due to the shape and construction of the front. However, I'm interested to know what that part is you've used as a ladder ahead of the bogie on the tender of your S2, as that looks just the job.
  14. Hod Carrier

    [MOC] CIE CC1

    @Andy Glascott Thank you. I'm happy to have been able to bring a little of the green of home to the forum. She was a pleasure to build and I'm glad to have been able to bring her to a wider audience.
  15. Hod Carrier

    [MOC] CIE CC1

    @bogieman Thank you so much. I always find that I get myself immersed in the detail of the models I build and end up learning a whole load more about them than is necessary to build them. I think that's why I've just built two alternative fuel locomotives rather than examples from a fleet, because I find their stories more engrossing.