Badsneaker

Have you seen this cool photography method

28 posts in this topic

Mmmm... Sugar.... :laugh:

It has a really nice effect, I have to try it out sometime.

Thanks for posting this!

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Those pictures look fantastic, i was quite suprised to find out it was all taken underwater. I have actualy wanted to try something like this myself with some Atlantis figures... :thumbup:

Edit: Spelling :tongue:

Edited by MrTools

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:laugh:

500x_4154463591_f126000363_o.jpg

They're all very good, but this one cracks me up.

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He is one of the best Hoth photographers IMO. His Flickr Photostream is here with some more cool Hoth shots. :sweet: Some of those comments on that are pretty stupid. :hmpf_bad:

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Mmmm... Sugar.... :laugh:

It has a really nice effect, I have to try it out sometime.

Thanks for posting this!

Reacted Plaster of Paris, actually... :classic:

I saw these through Gizmodo a while ago, and the one with the burning Astromech was my wallpaper for a while. Great find!

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Wow those are great photos. I would have never have guessed how it was done.

Thanks for the link!

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Great photos indeed, I really like them.

the Inventor

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OH WOW ! this is absolutely incredible ! what a unique way of creating such an incredible feel and look, i love it !

thank you so much for sharing this :cry_happy:

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These photos are very popular and definitely are some of the very best you can find for Starwars Lego Photography, I have been thinking about making Lego Starwars photos under natural environment, but the minifig size can be an issue - Fire, rain drops, and may be snow flakes are not exactly minifig scale compatible.

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yep, he's the grandmasterflash og lego hoth shots! :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:

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Thanks for posting the link to those photos. Excellent pics and some interesting techniques. I'd never have thought to use talcum powder for snow. might give that a try.

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Reacted Plaster of Paris, actually... :classic:

I saw these through Gizmodo a while ago, and the one with the burning Astromech was my wallpaper for a while. Great find!

Ssh! :wink:

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I've seen that before. You'd want to use something that won't dissolve.

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Hello!

A very inspiring and humorous gallery. And the snowing technique is definitely remarkable. :classic:

Good find!

~ Christopher

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He is a very good photographer and that's a great technique.

Smokebelch has done some similar but without the snow in the air.

Truly fun to look at.

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These pictures are great! :thumbup: I wonder how he managed to position the

snowballs under the water like that. :oh: Any ideas?

Edited by Cloney

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These pictures are great! :thumbup: I wonder how he managed to position the

snowballs under the water like that. :oh: Any ideas?

Apparently he uses ground plaster, which falls very slowly through the water so he has enough time to take the shot.

There's been some questions about how I do the snowshots. I've given some verbal information about the technique, but I guess, a photograph about my setup is needed. So, I made the photos above and below just for the occasion.

The setup is simple really. All I use is an old transparent CD storage box, some water and my trusty old A4 lightbox for lighting. For the bottom of the box I have a piece of gray Lego baseplate cut in form and hotglued on a piece of acrylic sheet to give it some weight. Legos float because of all the air trapped inside individual pieces.

Anything I want to shoot is then easily mounted on the baseplate and inserted inside the CD box.

Photographing "snow" in this scale is difficult, and to amp up the challenge I wanted it to fly around. The answer was not to use faster shutterspeed but to slow the snow down.

I had a wacky idea to submerge everything in water, it slows down everything that moves. The water also causes light to reflect from solid surfaces in a way that sometimes helps hiding the miniature scale. This is an old concept I've been toying with for ages. For the snow I use ground plaster of Paris (reacted, not unused gypsum powder!), it is a passive material that doesn't stick to anything.

Lighting is done with the lightbox freehand as you can see from the photo below.

I shoot a lot of frames because the "snow" is impossible to control exactly. And then some photoshopping is in order, but not always, sometimes none is needed.

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These pictures are great! :thumbup: I wonder how he managed to position the

snowballs under the water like that. :oh: Any ideas?

He probably dropped it in and let it fall while snapping piocs, or used fishin string, which woould be easy to photoshop out.

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he explained once: there's a needle or something that hold the snowball but it's shot in an angle where you can't see it

wall needle snowball camera

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One of my workmates sent me this jst before Christmas: I was well impressed! It's fascinting to see what original effects can be created when photographing LEGO, much we see in our own Photography thread here. Inspiring stuff!

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Wow, that's great! So the models are underwater?

It's like a snowglobe! (Is that what they're called?)

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Wow, that's great! So the models are underwater?

It's like a snowglobe! (Is that what they're called?)

Kind of it's more like a small fish tank, then he drops the stuff in and it sinks slowly.

very innovative.

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