Tommy Styrvoky

Eurobricks Counts
  • Content count

    1043
  • Joined

  • Last visited

2 Followers

About Tommy Styrvoky

  • Birthday 02/27/1997

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://tommystyrvoky.blogspot.com/

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Minnesota
  • Interests
    Interest in building large scale military RC models and sometimes other stuff. Other hobbies include 1/35 scale model armored fighting vehicles, photography, 3D modeling, and cycling.

Extra

  • Country
    United States

Recent Profile Visitors

3888 profile views
  1. 3D printed 8t sprocket

    If anyone wants to create their own parts, these are the parts I used in Autodesk Fusion 360 to cut the holes for the axles and the pins. Fusion 360 is free for students and makers, so basically anyone who won't be using it for a large business. The basic dimensions for a technic liftarm are 7.8mm tall*7.25 wide( when looking directly at the pin holes from the side, and spacing between holes is 8mm. https://www.bricksafe.com/pages/Tommy_styrvoky/cad3d-printed-parts
  2. 3D printed 8t sprocket

    Yeah my intentions are for a drive sprocket, the horrible jerky performance is true of all of the sprockets, it's just because of the the nature of the position of the track pins, they are flush with the contract surface, thus when rotating the sprocket, it causes it to be displaced vertically,
  3. 3D printed 8t sprocket

    The file is now public.
  4. 3D printed 8 tooth sprocket by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Something that I have long wanted to be a part is now a reality, as I have been doing a lot of 3D printing and modeling for my college's physics and chemistry departments. There have been so many models I have built where I had to compromise the scale due to having to size up the scale to accommodate the 10t sprocket. I have uploaded the model, for all who wish to 3D print it, the printer I used was a Lulzbot TAZ 6, as this resulted in some expansion in parts being printed in PLA, so I am unsure how well the tolerences will be if someone was to print from shapeways, as this model is intended for a cheaper FDM printer. 3D printed 8 tooth sprocket by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr 3D printed 8 tooth sprocket by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr 3D printed 8 tooth sprocket by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Thingiverse link https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2859595 I have a couple other useful ideas for parts, though I want to stay more purist with my models.
  5. Axle Collection Thread

    It's fine, I kind of expected this to be nearly impossible, though I will see if I can swap out the turntables, and that will solve the steering issue. worst case, I could just have the 1st and 4th axles just steered and suspended. This is only one of the first challenges with this model, the next one will be to fit the motors into the compact hull of this vehicle. This is the rough dimensions of the model, it may be a little large, as the suspension is wider.
  6. Axle Collection Thread

    The only reason I used the turntables is that they allowed me to place u-joints on either side of the axle, then there is only one stud of space between the u-joints, thus supporting them and making the axle rigid would be easier to do with the turntable. I will see if the solutions you suggested will work. I am only going to need 3-4 studs of travel in the suspension. reference image of the chassis.
  7. Axle Collection Thread

    I could swap the CV joints out for u-joints, and I think I will try to space the hubs 1/2 a stud from the steering arms. I am trying to keep the suspension around 15 studs wide, otherwise it will be too wide for scale. I have been doing a lot of digital building, as I am currently at college, also I don't have a set of the steering arms. As I want to keep the axles around 3 studs tall, otherwise, it will be too bulky for this vehicle.
  8. Axle Collection Thread

    I am currently working on an independent, steered, and all wheel drive chassis for a Sd.kfz. 234, an 8x8 armored car. Though I have run into an issue with the steering linkages, due to the method I had to utilize to make the chassis more compact, there are issues with travel in the steering links. Anyone have a good suggestion to solving this problem? current progress on LDD https://www.bricksafe.com/files/Tommy_styrvoky/Sdkfz 234.lxf Lego Sd.kfz. 234 chassis WIP by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego Sd.kfz. 234 chassis WIP by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr
  9. LDD file for the compact version. https://www.bricksafe.com/files/Tommy_styrvoky/compact dual differential steering.lxf
  10. Yeah your version it should work, I have a smaller design if you just want the steering portion of the mechanism. The design is system based, though it would be easy to convert to studless. Lego Adder/ Subtractor by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego Adder/ Subtractor by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego Adder/ Subtractor by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr
  11. Nice job replicating the sharp angles, of the vehicle it seems to perform rather well with just 4 L motors. maybe for changes, if possible maybe see if you could add the shallow sloping of the rear windows. Also maybe for the grill protector I think it would work better with the 1x4 curved slopes, for the side and middle parts, as it appears from the photo you posted of the original vehicle, the radiator is completely vertical.
  12. Version 2.0 I completely revised the steering gear, removing the worm gear and the loosely supported steering for the differentials, and increased the gear ratio from 1:2 to 1:3. This made the base unit more compact as well as reinforcing it. As I had some major issues with the previous version in some of my larger models, it failed to function correctly, and resulted in slippage and loss of power. Lego Integrated Dual differential steering and two speed transmission V2 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego Integrated Dual differential steering and two speed transmission V2 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego Integrated Dual differential steering and two speed transmission V2 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego Integrated Dual differential steering and two speed transmission V2 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr V2.0 LDD file I still need to sort out if the current option that I have for the gear selector will function correctly.
  13. E-100 super heavy tank

    They were a lot more common in WWII though this meant that most had a power shaft running from the engine bay in the rear directly through the center of the crew compartment to power the transmission and steering gear in the front. With modern vehicles, it's more common to have the drive sprocket located closer to the motor, as this allows for easy maintenance, and it helps lower the profile of the hull. Smaller AFVs like IFVs like the Bradley, Scimitar, and M113 usually have their drive sprocket in the front, as the motor is located in the front, and this allows for room for carrying equipment and troops in the back. One of the other applications in MBTs would be the Merkava series, as locating the powerpack (engine+transmission+steering gear) in the front provides additional material for crew protection from projectiles. Other wise with most other MBTs and larger vehicles, it is common to have a rear sprocket drive, as this allows for easy removal of the engine and transmission as a single unit, also the engine is much larger, so to have a frontally mounted system would mean that the turret would be shifted to the back of the hull more. Here's a similar powertrain layout to the E-100 in the Tiger II Also and having a frontally mounted transmission in a thick welded enclosure lead to interesting challenges to field maintenance see for example with the Panther, Tiger II, and planned for the E-100, where the transmission has to be fed through a small plate in the upper hull. Another case of of how impractical transmission installation on German vehicles are with the restoration of the Jagdpanther from the Weald Foundation. Or another example with the Tiger I where you needed to remove the turret to gain access to the transmission,
  14. E-100 super heavy tank

    It's just the nature of tracks are being pushed more from the front, rather than being pulled from the rear. This is dependent on where the track sag is, as on real vehicles, the track sag isn't as present, and the weight of the tracks has a greater effect, though with my model, It is because of tension, and the relative size of the track pitch being too large for the scale. There's not too much that can be done to solve this besides further tensioning them, and I didn't want to make them too tight, as that would also hinder performance. Here's some good footage of a German Panther's suspension in operation, this illustrates the similar setup as in the E-100, with the frontally mounted sprocket.
  15. E-100 super heavy tank

    It was the only way to fit the torsion bars, It was a creative solution, as I previously had tried to use some reductions, though It had issues with slipping, so I removed it, and used the angled solution.