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Found 322 results

  1. simon84

    [MOC] Lion Pub

    Hi everyone I'm new here in the forum and like to share my first MOC which I have been working on over the last 3 months. I build the MOC with BrickLink Studio 2.0 and used the new Eyesight Render for my images. I love the modular building sets from Lego but I missed the detail level on the upper floors. According to this I decide to design and build a more detailed modular building with more minifigures than the regular ones from lego. This building represents a classic British pub with a lot of typical details like a British cab, a London phone box, a classical English pub facade with a lot of flowers and much more. The modular style building with 3 floors and an accessible roof is built on a 32x32 base plate and contains 32 minifigures and approximately 6000 parts. Level 1 - Bar The first floor contains the main bar area of the pub and small full-featured restroom with toilet, urinal and lavatory. Outside there are bar tables and a red phone box. Minifigures Craftsman enjoying his after-work beer Bobby (Police Officer) on patrol Barkeeper and owner of the Lion Pub Regular guest who enjoys his retirement Best friends enjoy their free evening Level 2 – Gambling room The second floor features a gambling room complete with a pool table, poker corner and dart board. There is also a balcony on the back side to the backyard. Minifigures Young couple play a game of pool Office worker playing a game of darts Student can't keep his hands off gambling Housewife practices her passion at the poker table Professional poker player Level 3 – Live Music The third floor features a stage for live music, a small bar and a second full-featured restroom. Minifigures Punk who also loves Rock'n'Roll Aging hippie Piano player Elvis imitator and musician Groupie Barmaid Businessman enjoys a cool pint Champagne connoisseur and music lover Level 4 – Rooftop Party The last level offers space for a roof top party with a sitting corner under the overgrown pergola, bar tables, barbecue and DJ. Minifigures Man enjoying the delicious Hotdogs Barbecue chef Security DJane Female dancer Boyfriend of the female dancer Bestfriends start the evening with prosecco Celebrity couple Cab / Taxi Last but not least, the MOC offers a Classic London Cab heavily influenced by the "TFL Classic London Cab Taxi" from bamsham363 Minifigures Businessman treats himself to a pint Taxi driver Thanks very much for reading and I hope you like my first MOC. There are more pictures on Bricksafe and feel free to support my MOC on Rebrickable and let me know what you think. At the moment I am building my MOC with real Lego bricks. As soon as possible I will post any photos of the real lego building.
  2. I ve being thinking for a while to share with you my Lego Ideas Mocs... and I ve being hesitant. Well I decided to go ahead and do it!!! These is my latest moc and I m planning to upload the others too :) https://ideas.lego.com/content/project/link/3c993b46-9c04-400b-a633-86dd613463cc Based on several Japanese Traditional Watermills, this modular structure works both manually or with added Power Functions. It is made from 2073 Lego bricks, 3 minifigures and PF are also included in the count. When I began my research into Japanese Traditional Architecture I became fascinated with its Watermills... Such simple structures but at the same time so intriguing mechanisms that perform a simple task of grinding! My Working Watermill With Interior & Power Functions consists of the roof, a ground floor and a basement. The big Mill turns either by turning the crank on the rock in the river or by power functions that can be added in the basement. It creates movement in the mechanism found on the ground floor. If PF are not added the basement works as a storage for the seeds that are harvested and awaiting to be grinded. This would make a great set as I feel a working watermill is something missing from Lego sets. Its is very playful and could be easily added in a modular landscape. I m currently in the process of gathering bricks and hopefully before the end of the year I will be able to make it a real-life model! I would like to thank my dear friend @Patgeo for helping me work out and simplify the gears and power function mechanism!!!
  3. thenightman89

    [MOC] US Supreme Court Building

    I designed the US Supreme Court in the style of the Architecture Landmark series! Since the building is actually quite long in its depth, I took inspiration from the overall approach of the official Trafalgar Square set. The rear side of the building also features a super micro version of the famous courtroom! Let me know what you think!
  4. IMG-20200718-WA0037 by Barney Rayfield, on Flickr Apologies, I am still getting my head around adding photos or hotlinks to Eurobricks. Now on Youtube https://www.flickr.com/gp/189396852@N04/M022um The Royal Albert Hall is situated in South West London and is one of the most internationally recognised buildings. Designed to promote the arts and sciences it has since 1871 maintained its hectic schedule of rock gigs, classical music concerts, community and school concerts, comedy, circus, lectures, film premieres and sports, including tennis and even boxing. It is the Rolls Royce of village halls! IMG-20200718-WA0035 by Barney Rayfield, on Flickr The base hinges to split the hall and reveal the auditorium with organ and a grand piano. 20200718_210753 by Barney Rayfield, on Flickr 20200718_210544 by Barney Rayfield, on Flickr The detailed roof (including the ceiling 'mushrooms' to improve the acoustic) can be lifted as can the auditorium. Each half of the hall can be lifted out to access a basic representation of the loading bay, car park, backstage and arena bars. 20200718_210251 by Barney Rayfield, on Flickr 20200718_211952 by Barney Rayfield, on Flickr 20200718_211130 by Barney Rayfield, on Flickr Further details include the south steps with John Durham's statue of Prince Albert presiding over representations of the four continents and the tree outside stage door planted in tribute to Mario Lanza. IMG-20200718-WA0041 by Barney Rayfield, on Flickr Part dolls house, part Russian doll this basically consists of 5 components (base, both halves of the exterior, auditorium and roof) slotting inside the other. https://ideas.lego.com/projects/183167bd-8302-4cbc-bf1d-42f26e96a9dd/comments_tab#content_nav_tabs Please support on Ideas if you like. Many thanks. 20200718_211001 by Barney Rayfield, on Flickr I had been stockpiling dark red and tan Lego for some time even though I was too busy to contemplate building the Hall. Then with Covid 19 and the lock down I suddenly had no excuse. The Royal Albert Hall is very close to my heart: I work there and to see it shut and empty is beyond heart breaking. IMG-20200718-WA0032 by Barney Rayfield, on Flickr I finished this just as the 2020 Proms started and this is a model to celebrate not just a venue but live music the world over. Wherever you are please look after your arts venues. They will be the last parts of the economy to be reopened and need our help. 20200718_205647 by Barney Rayfield, on Flickr 20200718_214133 by Barney Rayfield, on Flickr Please do go to the Royal Albert Hall's website if you want to donate but in the meantime I hope you like the model. Please tell your friends. I am barely on social media so fee free to share photos of it. I might need a piggy back to get this seen. IMG-20200718-WA0038 by Brney Rayfield, on Flickr
  5. thenightman89

    [MOC] Walt Disney World skylines

    Welcome to "The Happiest Place on Earth!" I designed a skyline for each of the four main Walt Disney World parks - with each park's primary icon in the center of each. The length of each skyline is the same (and identical length to the official London and Paris skyline sets). Any one who may be interested in instructions can find them here and on Rebrickable.com! MAGIC KINGDOM: EPCOT: HOLLYWOOD STUDIOS: ANIMAL KINGDOM: Let me know what you think!
  6. It's wonderful to see that The LEGO Group's confidence in the Architecture Series has increased enough for worldwide landmarks to appear! In what might seem opportunistic timing, with the fast approaching 2012 Olympics being held in London, TLG has revealed that its latest Architecture set will model what is probably London's most iconic landmark: the clock tower of Big Ben. As has been pointed out innumerable times, Big Ben is actually the name of the huge bell which resides within the tower, itself forming the north-west corner of the Palace of Westminster; the tower itself is known simply as the Clock Tower. But if you say 'Big Ben', I imagine people from around the world will immediately picture this famous tower. This review is a team effort by Pandora and myself (with a little extra help from a certain someone at a crucial point ). The opinions presented here are ours; fortunately we agreed on pretty much everything so there was little need for discussion! Anyway, with further ado, Pandora and Rufus are proud to present.... Review: 21013 Big Ben Set Information Name: Big Ben Number: 21013 Theme: Architecture (Landmark Series) Release: 1 June 2012 Parts: 341 (our count) Price: US $29.99 | EUR 29.99 | CAD $39.99 Links ... Brickset ... LEGO Architecture We'll update the price information, links and the official set description as they become available. The Box The smart but rather austere box livery of the Architecture range continues with this set. I see no reason to change it! Big Ben sits atop a technical drawing which may well represent architectural plans of the Palace of Westminster, but who's checking. The eagle-eyed among you might note that this latest addition to the Architecture range is designed not by Adam Reed Tucker, but instead by Rok Zgalin Kobe, a Slovenian architect. The back of the box is more colourful, sporting a scale render of the model, with some pictures of the real building in atypical English weather: The text is a language lesson describing the enclosed booklet, which is in English, and mentions the two Architects of the tower, Charles Barry and Augustus Pugin. The narrow sides are well suited to a tall, narrow model, and allow the boxes to be stacked on shelves vertically. The left side features a beautiful low-down shot of the tower: ... while the right side, which forms the flap of the box lid, shows an interesting 'exploded' render of the model beside the 'Choking Hazard' warning in a vast array of international languages. A very small part-rendered picture graces the top of the box, and the bottom reveals that parts were sourced in DENMARK, HUNGARY, MEXICO, and the CZECH REPUBLIC. We suspect this represents different manufacturing sources for different regions. Interestingly, this set - despite being considerably larger - comes in a box no bigger than those of the smallest sets in the range. It is of identical size to 21002 Empire State Building, or 21000 Willis (formerly Sears) Tower, Chicago, pictured here: It is, as you might imagine, considerably heavier, and clearly requires two extra years of building experience to build it. Contents We love these Architecture boxes! There's a certain sense of nostalgia for the days of intricate packaging which heightened the whole LEGO experience. Admittedly these don't have the (expensive, we've no doubt) plastic inserts and lifting lids of the 80s, but it's clear that TLG have gone to some pains to make the box as collectable as the set. You can even flatpack the box for longevity without tearing or cutting! The box is almost as smart on the inside: This one is remarkably full, which helps to preserve the instruction manual. You are instructed clearly to 'Enjoy your building experience.' as you open the lid. It's a really nice touch, and emphasises the lengths TLG has gone to to maximise the ... um ... building experience. Out of the box are pulled four polybags, and two loose plates. As Siegfried/Sinner mentioned in the Sydney Opera House review, it's a shame that not all of the parts are bagged, but we can't really blame LEGO for this in this case. It's only two pieces, and would probably require much larger bags, which might in turn necessitate a larger box to allow automated packing. Looking at this picture, you immediately get a sense of the rather small parts variety - there are only 33 different pieces in the set, including different colours of the same part. Instructions Some serious thought has gone into this instruction manual. It is quite thick, and beautifully presented, being printed on high quality paper, like all the sets in the Architecture range. Aside from the difference in orientation, the cover is similar to the box front, but does reference the Architecture website. The rear cover of the manual features an alternative view of the tower from behind: but is otherwise rather plain. Most of the interest is contained inside the manual, where can be found ten pages of facts about the tower and its construction, an example of which is shown here: The text is superbly written. It is a potted history, packed with facts and interesting to read, without being a daunting mass of text. We learned quite a lot ourselves! Following the tower facts comes a double-paged biography of the architects: The pictures here are reprints of oil portraits of the long-departed designers of the tower. Again, kudos to LEGO for going the extra mile to add interest and value. The instructions themselves are clear, and nicely paced to avoid confusion without being patronising. About every eight or nine pages is a little inset depicting further little factoids about the building: It's easy to miss these, if you are concentrating on the building. We'd recommend taking your time when building, and enjoying these little tidbits of information when you encounter them! They are a really nice touch. Otherwise, there are some parts in similar colours (particularly black and dark bluish grey), which could cause confusion; however, if you follow the build order then there shouldn't be any problems. You would notice if you used a dark bluish grey 1x2 tile on the base, for instance (unless you're building in the dark ). Towards the rear of the manual is the now-standard parts inventory: Again, the small variety of parts is readily apparent, and belies the size of the set. Finally, we are treated to a discourse from the Artist himself, and an intriguing look at Architecture in the early days of LEGO (including the invention of the plate!) We're pleased to note that Rok Zgalin Kobe refers to SNOT (Studs Not On Top), implying it's the acronym used by LEGO designers themselves! We're easily pleased. The Parts But enough about paper, what about the plastic? We've arranged the parts according to the polybag they came in, which is roughly dictated by size. The largest bag contains the large tiles, including the unique printed 'Big Ben' piece, and a sea of tan. Most of these parts are commonplace; even the 2x2 clock face is often found at the Pick-a-Brick wall. Of note are the dark bluish grey 'Slope 45 1x2 Double', found in two other sets, and the 'Slope 75 2x2x2 Quadruple Convex' in DBG and the two earth green 2x3 Plates, each found only in one other set. Not rare, though useful, are the nine 1x1 bricks with four studs ('dalek pieces', as we've heard them called). Generally, part variety is small but quantity high: We're certainly not complaining about the 57 round bricks and 32 grille tiles in tan, useful for architectural MOCs. 2x1 tan plates were at the PaB wall recently, so we're not short of those... ... but jumper plates are always useful. Finally, we have the ubiquitous round 1x1 plates, and 1x1 tiles in tan are most welcome. Not a cheese wedge in sight! Overall, it's a part selection that won't get too many people excited, with only a small number of rare elements, although the quantity of some of the parts might make this useful as a parts pack. The Build Let's put these plastic blocks together! As you might expect, we start with the familiar Architecture base: Immediately, you can see by the jumper plates that the model uses a half-stud offset for the entire structure. This is presumably to centre the model, which is an odd number of studs in length. The jumpers make a surprisingly strong connection, meaning you can build the model whilst holding it, rather than on a flat surface, although it's worth noting that the two black plates at the base are only connnected via three tiles, giving them a tendency to separate slightly if you do do this. The 'trick' behind the SNOT wall detail is revealed in this shot: SNOT bricks - with 1 (white), 2 (light bluish grey) and 4 (black) studs on sides are used to attach 1x2 plate-grille tile pieces to give the sides their ridged detail. The 'gap' that remains under the grilles is filled with 1x1 tiles. This technique is a little fiddly, but surprisingly strong and effective, and is used throughout the model. For the second layer, rinse, and repeat... well, nearly. Here you can see that only black 'dalek' pieces have been used to add SNOT to the sides, rather than the two-sided stud pieces. Although this might at first glance seem odd - it prevents adding 1x1 bricks in between, which might weaken the structure - there are two reasons for this. One is that the side-facing studs are also used in some places - to hold SNOT tiling at the side, and the mysterious upward-pointing dark bluish grey tile you can see here - and the second is that the 'open stud' on the top of the dalek pieces is required to attach the roof at a half stud offset (similar to the use of technic 1x1 bricks in the White House, or Empire State Building) With the roof-pieces attached, the odd DBG tile fills a gap caused by the half-stud offset : As we add height to the tower, things get a little repetitive, with three identical layers to construct. As we approach the top of the tower, four single-stud SNOT pieces are added which will hold the clock faces: And here we can have a nice look at the rear of the building . Finally, the rather intricate roof is built: And we're done! The build takes about 30 minutes if you're rushing, or an hour if you're leisurely (and read the history while you're at it). It's a little fiddly in places (making sure the 1x1 tiles sit squarely is a pain, but this is always a problem), and gets a bit repetitive, but being a smallish model this is counteracted by the feeling of the tower taking shape. Some of the SNOT techniques, especially the roof, are a nice surprise. The Complete Set Now let's take a look at the finished article. Big Ben stands proud and erect in all his slightly phallic glory: This angle shows clearly how effective the half-stud offset is at centering the tower. We like the use of the SNOT grille-tiles for adding the ridged detail which is crucial for adding realism, and the differentiation between the various levels of the building is brought about quite neatly and simply by the use of 1x1 bricks or round bricks at various points. It's highly effective. Now, let's get this out of the way: the major flaw of this set is the clock faces, which stand proud of the tower by two plates, unlike the real clocks which are if anything slightly recessed. This is a product of the designer's decision to make the entire building three studs wide, which is necessary to make the building affordable, keep consistency with the rest of the Landmark Series, and itself makes the build more interesting in places. Moreover, the design of the 2x2 round tile on which the clock sits - with a cross in the centre of the underside, rather than an anti-stud - necessitates the use of the extra 2x2 plate, therefore exacerbating the problem. A possible solution to this would be to build the clock section of the tower in four-studs wide, at a half-stud offset. One day we'll try this. Maybe the designer did, but chose this method in the end. Now that's out of the way, let's continue enjoying the view. Here's the rear: The tower (obviously) looks the same from every angle, but here you get a view of the snippet of the rest of Palace of Westminster. It's 'cut off' from the rest of the building; the blank tiles/bricks indicate where the building would continue: here, and on the left side. Note the 1x1 round plates instead of cones at the rear: this approximates to a real feature of the building, which doesn't have spires on the inward facing parapets. Side views (left and right respectively): The left side features a little dark green, representing a small lawn area in front of the tower where politicians and press gather from time to time. Note again the cut-off where the building would continue to the river edge. The right side faces Parliament Square, where the tower sits flush with the edge of the Palace. Finally, a shot representing the most common view of the tower: Another slight niggle, and again due to the use of the three-wide scale, is that the lower part of the roof doesn't slope particularly gracefully, but the use of round studs is probably the best compromise the designer could achieve. Comparison Now lets compare the set to the real thing. Being rather camera-shy, Pandora and I grabbed an unsuspecting random American tourist to help with these shots. The model is rather small (as is the LEGO set ) making direct comparison difficult. It's approximately 1:350 scale, after all. Still, you can see that the overall impression of the model is pretty accurate, which we think is as good as could be achieved at this scale. Getting both the tower and the model in focus together was nigh-on impossible. This is about the best we could do: The blocky roof isn't so noticeable here; unfortunately, the sticky-outy clock faces are. But the time is uncannily correct. Our contract with the Random American Tourist demanded more than just one picture: He made himself useful, and got us into the London Eye for some aerial views: Well, we'd love a massive Architecture set of the entire Palace of Westminster, but that isn't going to happen anytime soon... ... so here's a shot focused on Big Ben himself, from a similar angle as the last set picture: We should mention here an interesting observation. On the way out of the London Eye is a gift shop filled with souvenirs (many relating to the forthcoming Olympics). This (and many other souvenir shops around the area) would be an ideal place to sell this set - it'll appeal to chance customers who wouldn't normally even consider buying LEGO. The set makes a great souvenir - it is instantly recognisable, despite its flaws, and this market would perhaps be rather more forgiving than the average AFOL. We hope TLG have already thought of this. Conclusion Bus and Grenadier Guard not supplied with set. We were a little disappointed when we saw the preliminary pictures, but having seen the set 'in the flesh', as it were, we think this is actually rather a nice set. Sure, the protruding clock-faces aren't ideal, but they're certainly better than stickers, and the flaw is balanced by the level of detailing which is astonishing for such a small scale. Moreover, if the preliminary prices are correct, this set represents far better value than most of the smaller Architecture sets, and perhaps hints that the line is firmly hitting the mainstream. The Big Ben set, together with its attractive packaging and informative manual, makes a wonderful collectors' item, and indeed potentially a lucrative souvenir piece (if TLG takes our advice on this ). I'm sure they've already thought of this, as the timing of its release with the 2012 Olympics hints. A larger-scale model might allow more detail, solve the clock problem, and enable perhaps a bit of gold decoration on the tower; but would restrict the target market to the die-hard LEGO fans. Perhaps TLG have deliberately decided to accept the smaller scale compromise; we think that, overall, the set is pretty good for the scale. Design 8 Were it not for the clock faces, we'd give this 10. It's remarkably detailed for the scale. Build 9 A pleasing build, sometimes a little repetitive, but with some interesting features along the way. If you follow the manual carefully, it is an enjoyable experience. Parts 7 It's not really a set for rare part hunters, but might appeal as a parts pack if you need tan grille tiles or round bricks. Value 8 We haven't seen the UK price yet, but going by the US and European pricing, this does seem to be better value than many of the smaller Architecture sets. Overall 8/10 Big Ben might not appeal to die-hard sticklers for accuracy, but it's a detailed and recognisable rendition of what is perhaps London's most iconic landmark. We were rather pleasantly surprised. Thanks for reading! We hope you enjoyed the review. Many thanks to CopMike for making this possible, TLG for allowing us an early look at the set, and Hinckley for being such a good model! Pandora and Rufus. More pictures on flickr.
  7. thenightman89

    [LEGO Ideas] Indiana Jones Trilogy

    ** 10,000 supporters could make this project a real LEGO set! Celebrate the 40th Anniversary of Indiana Jones by clicking here and then click the “Support” button! ** This microscale build is constructed in the style of the LEGO Architecture Skyline series and features the iconic locations where famous archeologist, Indiana Jones, recovered priceless historical artifacts: The Temple of Doom (Sankara Stones) [1935, The Temple of Doom] The Well of Souls (The Ark of the Covenant) [1936, Raiders of the Lost Ark] Temple of the Sun (The Holy Grail) [1938, The Last Crusade] Unlike the historical artifacts (which belong in a museum!), this set belongs on your desk! This compact 650-piece set (9.4" L x 3.2" W x 3.7" H) makes for the perfect display piece for every fan of Indiana Jones. The set is also paired with a stand that includes three desirable minifigures from the popular films: Indiana Jones Marion Ravenwood Dr. Henry Walton Jones, Sr. The backside of the set also includes additional references to the films with a microscale mine car chase and the interior of the Grail Temple. Lego fans young and old will delight in creating these iconic locations and discovering their hidden secrets. If you love Indiana Jones and LEGO, I would be forever thankful for your support!
  8. Introduction Hi fellow EB members! In this early spring, Lego takes us to a walk on the 5th avenue, New York. The Guggenheim Museum is worldwide known for its art collection as well as for its architecture. I'm not sure what LEGO thinks of art, but I'm sure they're very interested in architecture, and that's why they released the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum as their new set in the Architecture theme! Thanks to EB LUG Ambassador CopMike and the LEGO CEE Team and Designers for giving me the opportunity to review this set! Set information Name: 21035 Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Theme: LEGO Model Making / Architecture Year: 2017 Pieces: 744 Price: USD 79.99, GBP 64.99, EURO 69.99 Resources: Brickset , BrickLink Packaging The box comes in the usual LEGO Architecture 's black livery, but in an odd almost square shape. It is also quite thick, as there's 744 parts to stuff in. The front shows the full set, proudly standing on blueprints against the black background. On the upper left corner is a rather big LEGO Architecture logo and just under is the name of the set and its location in the world and the set's sizes... Nothing fancy here, just the good old Architecture box! The back of the box has a front shot of the set and a picture of the real buildings and a short comment on the museum in a few languages. Size of the set is also indicated: 190mm wide and 125mm tall. Content of the box The box is almost full, with the instruction booklet and 6 unnumbered bags, one of which contains a brick separator for your collection. Instructions booklet The 167 pages instructions booklet is, as always with Architecture sets, very well done and good looking with the classic black background. There are a lot of nice pictures of the building and its interior, with lots of facts. The instructions are easy to follow and no color errors should be made. You can see here one the many pictures and facts that pop up in the corners of the booklet. You can also see that some steps need quite a bunch of parts, but I reassure you, many steps onl require a single plate! Build First steps passed. If you look closely, you may notice a big change compared to the other sets of the theme... The set makes a great use of the newly released rounded tiles to add details. The build uses lots of 1/2 studs offsets and snot techniques. Continuig with the building... The technique used to achieve the rounded sections is really nice and makes use of many new parts. The finished set in all his glory! My finger hurts of placing all those tan 1x1 tiles! As always there are some spare parts. Interesting parts The set comes with a nice selection of white curved slopes, and among them the rather new 3x2 white curved slope. Three 2x3 white tiles are also present. The set is also at the moment the best source for 1x1 quarter round tiles in light bluish gray. Parts in new or rare colors include the 6x6 round plate in white and black, the 10x10 inverted dish in sand green, the 2x4 wedge plate in sand green, a 3x3 cross plate in tan, a white 1x3x1 panel , and 4 of the new 1x1modified brick with 2 studs on adjacent sides in black! And of course two nice printed tile and curved slope with the museum's name on it. Conclusion Design: 9/10 - A really nice set in the Architecture theme! One of my favorite. Parts: 8/10 - Some very interesting parts in this set, and maybe more variety than other sets of the theme. Build: 8/10 - An interesting build, not too monotonous. Price: 7/10 - At 9.4 cent per part, this set is in the price average of the Architecture theme's sets. Overall: 32/40 (80%) - I really enjoyed building this set! I think it may be one of the best set of the recently released Architecture sets. If you're a fan of the theme, go grab it, you won't regret it.
  9. thenightman89

    [MOC] Neuschwanstein Castle

    I designed Neuschwanstein Castle in the style of the LEGO Architecture series, and it contains about 1,276 pieces. This world famous castle is located in southern Bavaria and was built by Ludwig II (aka "The Mad King"). This Romanesque castle served as key inspiration for Walt Disney's own Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella Castles. Let me know what you think! I don't have instructions for this build just yet, but my other instructions can be found here and on Rebrickable.com.
  10. Nasty Tower Opposition (Awful Towers) Gloomy Towers
  11. I am pleased to introduce you my latest Architecture MOC : Notre Dame de Paris Notre Dame de Paris (LEGO Architecture) by Daniel Stoeffler, on Flickr The model uses 2200 parts and the building process can be followed into .A building instruction and a file of the Bricklink inventory are available. Some more pictures : Notre Dame de Paris (LEGO Architecture) by Daniel Stoeffler, on Flickr Notre Dame de Paris (LEGO Architecture) by Daniel Stoeffler, on Flickr Notre Dame de Paris (LEGO Architecture) by Daniel Stoeffler, on Flickr Notre Dame de Paris (LEGO Architecture) by Daniel Stoeffler, on Flickr More pictures into this Flickr Album. Finally, the model is nearly at the same scale as Notre Dame de Strasbourg Notre Dame de Paris vs Notre Dame de Strasbourg (LEGO Architecture) by Daniel Stoeffler, on Flickr
  12. jedisquidward

    [MOC] Federal Hall

    "Federal Hall!" -George Sears Located in New York City, George Washington had his Presidential Inauguration here on April 30, 1779. It's also the finale location in Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty, and it has a lot of personal meaning to me. Though this is one of my first MOCs, I wanted to try and be as professional as possible in creating something that could look as if it were an official Architecture set in trend with other US Federal Buildings. Though I had the luxury of the back being plain, the main structure is 15×7 studs, and I really had to optimize all space to neatly display the exact details I desired. More details can be seen here: http://imgur.com/gallery/N2wIEFF
  13. Hi everybody, I recently saw the statue of liberty architecture set (21042) sold at a 35% discount and simply could not resist. It is a marvelous display piece. The only thing I could not live with was that "shield face", so I took some liberty there. It ain't perfect but I actually like it quite a bit that way. I followed here a completely different approach then Jason Allemann which did another interesting "face-MOD" of that statue a while ago.
  14. LegoModularFan

    Inspirational Modular and Castle MOCs

    Hey guys, I decided to create this topic and the main idea came from this and this post (so special thanks to @danth and @Digger of Bricks!). I would like to highlight three things before I start to post inspirational MOCs: I’ll post three staff picks everyday! Please feel free to post your favorite MOCs! Have fun admiring and taking inspiration from those great MOCs Top three MOC’s IMO in Baroque architecture: 1. This incredible Baroque Church by @Jellyeater! 2. This amazingly detailed MOC by @pj_bosman! 3. This greatly shaped modular by @cimddwc! Here are the three best Baroque MOC’s IMO! What do you think about them? Would you buy modulars like those if TLG made? Here are the Steampunk ones: 1. This incredible layout made together by @castor-troy and @domino39 (they also made one MOD of the PR and the MS and two MOD’s of the CC included in this layout. But they look so different that they are more MOC then MOD). EB topic here and Flickr albums with more photos here, here, here and here. 2. These great Steampunk modulars by @adde51! 3. These very interesting modulars by @Zilmrud who as well made great MOD’s of the PC and the BB! Here are the three most gorgeous Steampunk MOC’s IMO! What do you think of them? Would you buy modulars like those if TLG ever made?
  15. DwalinF

    [MOC] Technopil City

    Once I have visit city Ternopil (Ukraine), and saw there a nice church. Since that I wanted to recreate it in bricks. It is not exactly that church (and not in Ternopil), but also not bad, as for me. For the second tower I just haven't parts. Also I haven't parts for square in front, so I made just stands for small scenes of citylife and unite all in one with pipes. So free your imagination ;-)
  16. Here it is, my newest model, the Woolworth Building. The Woolworth Building is an early American skyscraper located in Manhattan, New York City. Designed by architect Cass Gilbert, it was the tallest building in the world from 1913 to 1930, with a height of 792 feet (241 m). Located in Manhattan's Tribeca neighborhood, The 60-story structure consists of a 30-story tower situated atop a 30-story base. Its facade is mostly decorated with terracotta (though the lower portions are limestone) and contains thousands of windows. The skyscraper was originally conceived by F. W. Woolworth, the founder of a brand of popular five-and-ten-cent stores, as a headquarters for his company. Woolworth planned the skyscraper jointly with the Irving National Exchange Bank, which also agreed to use the structure as its headquarters. Construction started in 1910, and it was completed two years later. The Woolworth Building underwent several changes throughout its history. The top thirty floors, formerly used as office space, were sold to a developer in 2012 and subsequently converted into residences. The remainder of the building remains in use by office and commercial tenants. This model stands at 63cm tall and contains ~8,500 pieces, built at a 1:400 scale. There is a lot of techniques I had to come up with to be able to get all of the details in the façade and the roof. The details of the Woolworth Building are so intricate that it would be impossible to include everything at this scale but I tried my best to make it work. Overall, I'm really happy with the way it has turned out and I can't wait to get started on my next build.... More pictures can be found on my flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/186855130@N08/albums/72157713858882581
  17. Razvy_cluj_ro

    [MOC] Central Park Casino

    Hello everyone! This is my first post on Eurobricks in a while! Located in the heart of Transylvania, Cluj Napoca is the second biggest city in Romania. Built in an Architecture theme style, the Central Park Casino is one of the most representative and well-known buildings of the city. It is the main building of the city's Central Park, and it has served multiple purposes over the years, currently being used as a cultural destination. Being built in the late 19th century, its eclectic architecture is closely resembled using LEGO elements. The LEGO model consists of 1650 pieces that represent as closely as possible the small details, columns, windows and overall shape of the real-world Casino. It was built with a modular design in mind, resulting in 25 different subsections such as the baseplates, arches, corners, sides, roof, etc. The MOC was showcased at the Brickenburg Winter Exhibition of 2019-2020, in Romania, and also at the Skaerbaek Fan Weekend 2019, in Denmark. If you wish to support it, you can find the Casino on LEGO Ideas: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/6405c9e0-f7d0-47ef-a075-6fd097deaf52 Thank you very much! Would love to hear your opinions on this.
  18. thenightman89

    [MOC] "Jurassic Park" Skyline

    "LEGO, uh, finds a way." This MOC is built in the style of the LEGO Architecture Skyline series and features some of the iconic locations from the classic film, including: Helicopter Landing Pad Jurassic Park Visitor Center Jurassic Park Gate "That's one big pile of s#*t" Raptor Pen Tyrannosaurus Rex Pen Let me know what you think! Anyone interested can also find me on Instagram @BenBuildsLego (Instructions can be found here and on Rebrickable.com).
  19. thenightman89

    [MOC] "The Mandalorian" Skyline

    "This is the way." This build is done in the style of the Architecture skyline series and features the most iconic locations from the first season of "The Mandalorian." - Unidentified Ice Planet - Arvala-7 - Navarro - Sorgan - Tatooine Step-by-step instructions for this build can be accessed here and on Rebrickable.com. If you love "Indiana Jones," I'd love your support on Lego Ideas! https://ideas.lego.com/projects/7b3163aa-f97d-49ec-b230-176a94bc5626 Please share this link to help spread the word!
  20. https://ideas.lego.com/projects/49ca9889-05fb-4887-ab3a-aad4add5237e Cultural link : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenshu https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onna-bugeisha https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yumi https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomoe_Gozen https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nakano_Takeko https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ono_(weapon) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ōtsuchi https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oyumi https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oni https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torii I love Ninjago and Japan. Thus was born this idea with historical consonance of medieval Japan, while being incorporable with Ninjago. I have been looking for a long time: to have a strong iconic and cultural medieval Japanese architecture, and to have a Ninjago aspect. The Soutou Tenshu ! In Japanese, a "Tenshu" is a multi-floor castle tower. A "Tenshukaku" is a Japanese castle. A "Soutou Tenshu" designates a particular architectural form, which is a smaller version of a Tenshukaku. There is no word in English or in Western culture for this type of construction. It’s not just a tower of a castle. It is a scaled-down reproduction of a main keep in a Japanese castle. In the West, this notion does not exist. To date, there are 12 original surviving Japanese castles. So few remain… The Soutou Tenshu are a cultural treasure in Japan; they are emblematic of its architectural sophistication, beauty and functionality. They are classified as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Soutou Tenshu - LEGO IDEA by Horlack, sur Flickr With my creation, I have not reproduced an existing Soutou Tenshu. I wanted an authentic representation of a Soutou Tenshu, but I also wanted to pay tribute to all the Soutou Tenshu which have disappeared over history. That is to say, I preserved the architectural spirit of the Soutou Tenshu, while allowing myself the freedom of imagination to incorporate playability into its construction for a child. The toy aspect of this for a child is just as important to me as its cultural fidelity to Japan. I have devoted myself to researching and uncovering ancient and long-forgotten aspects of Japanese culture. Whether just forgotten by time or lost in the writings of European historians who “westernized” the Orient too much. Modern history books have erased certain historical facts about Japan which did not agree with their vision of the western (often masculine) world, sometimes so much so that we forget about the Japanese themselves ! For example, today we know that Samurai often had katanas, an iconic and mythical Japanese sword. But we forget that many samurai did not have the financial means to buy such a prestigious weapon, which might cost them years, or even a lifetime, of salary. Likewise, we overlook the fact that there were more modest samurai who fought with axes, spears and bows. More importantly, we are unaware that there were samurai women, called Onna Bugeisha, who could make up 30% of an army. But modern Western feminism ignores the fact that the Japanese, 5 to 6 centuries before the Westerners, already had their feminism. No, feminism is not credited as a gift of our modern world. Thus, I intentionally incorporated into my Soutou Tenshu five powerful elements of ancient Japanese culture, forgotten and passed over in silence by Western reports. Personnagesi-01 by Horlack, sur Flickr 1 / A female samurai figurine with a Japanese longbow, named Daïkyu. Like the famous Samourai woman Tomoe Gozen, whose life gave birth to beautiful poems and tales. Woman of legend, with an extraordinary destiny, who commanded men. (Kimono based on figurine Ivy Walker - set 70620) 2 / A female samurai figurine with a long spear, named Nagamaki or Naginata. Like the famous woman Samourai Nakano Takeko, of the Aizu clan, who ordered up to 30% of samurai women equipped with this weapon, in her army. The length of the handle of the Nagamaki and Naginata, allowed women to keep an enemy at a distance, even if the opponent was stronger. The advantages of this weapon are a bit like the Greek phalanxes under Alexander. (based on Kimono Girl, Series 4) 3 / A male samurai figurine, with a large axe named a Masakari, and a small axe named an Ono. Representative of some samurai from low social class, such as farmers or monks (also named "samurai monk" or "warrior monk"); many of these men rose to the rank of samurai by their courage and loyalty to their lord. They often fought with weapons from their social class (like axes), because the Katana was inaccessible to them financially. (based on figurine Kendo Fighter, Series 15 & Samurai Warrior, Series 3 & Samurai, Series 13) 4 / A male samurai figurine, with a large mallet made entirely of hard wood known as an Otsuchi. This weapon was used by samurai from low social class. It was also effective for breaking down castle doors. Despite its heavy and rudimentary appearance, it was a formidable weapon to crush the leather and metal armor of enemy samurai (based on figurine Kendo Fighter, Series 15 & Samurai Warrior, Series 3 & Samurai, Series 13) 5 / The ōyumi, a defensive ballista. The ōyumi was a complicated type of giant crossbow, although historians are unsure of its appearance, as there are no real examples or illustrations known. Only five medieval texts refer to it. Historians agree that this weapon did exist, but it is one of the forgotten weapons of Japan’s past, and its details have been lost in history. The construction of Soutou Tenshu, with a certain free interpretation to be compatible with the gameplay: Ground floor : -Door with stylized Oni face -Stylized portal (or Torii), with emblem of Japan (wink) -Forge / blacksmith -Well water -Water and sake reserve (wink) -Prison / warehouse room -Ōyumi ballist -Various weapons. -Sakura Cherry blossom tree (emblematic tree of Japan) First floor : -Kitchen -Dining room / refectory -Weapons room / training room Second floor : -Bedroom Base : Folding base with 3 basic hinges (pivots) on the outsides, and a triple system of internal hinges per pivot, to stabilize and strengthen the base, with part number 19954 Hinge plate 1x2. When the base is closed, the stability and structural integrity is increased by the triple internal hinge system, and also by the 4 train magnets hidden in the walls of the ground floor. . Play functions : Everything is playable and functional. You can open the Tenshu by the hinges of the base, or by lifting the building floors like the LEGO Modular sets. Everything is accessible both horizontally and vertically. Working : Make with LEGO Digital Designer and Studio (Bricklink). There are 2987 bricks without minifigurines. The project required around three weeks of working and 72 hours of 3D rendering (calculation). If you love Japan, or your kids love Lego Ninjago, then support me ! thanks you very much.
  21. In the 1960s, Northwestern University embarked on a construction frenzy. Skidmore, Owings & Merrill engineered the reclamation of 75-ish acres from Lake Michigan to roughly double the size of the university's campus in Evanston, Illinois. At the same time, Walter Netsch, an architect at SOM, was appointed to design several buildings, including University Library, for the new land. This is what he came up with. In plan, the design consists of a plaza oriented on an east-west axis, flanked by towers to the north, south, and east. Corridors on the west end of the library connect to the university's existing library, built in 1932-33. Netsch's concept, designed for the oncoming Digital Age, was that each of the three towers, organized around a central block, should house a different collection. Shelves in the stacks are arranged as spokes on a wheel so that a student should consult the computerized catalog in the center of the wheel to locate and obtain the desired material in minimum time with minimal hassle. It was, and perhaps still is, university policy that all buildings must be faced with limestone. Limestone is much too tasteful for Brutalist architecture, though, so University Library, and most of Netsch's other works on Northwestern's campus, are textured to make the limestone look like concrete. In the original plan, the central block from which the towers diverge was meant to be the entrance. Instead, Netsch's design was changed so the weird octagon thing became the entrance, because it is closer to the university's existing library. The central core still contains the elevators and bathrooms, but the intended entrance hall is now a cafe. Netsch raised the library's stacks on columns so that a person standing on the plaza, looking to the east, would have an uninterrupted view of Lake Michigan and the horizon. I'm sure it would have been a nice view, but Netsch's design was subverted in 1971 by the construction of another building immediately to the east of the library. I really don't like this building, but it was fun to design an architecture-type model based on it. All these images were rendered using Bluerender. Thanks for looking!
  22. thenightman89

    [MOC] Disney World Skyline

    I designed a skyline of Disney World that features the four icons of the parks: - Animal Kingdom: The Tree of Life - Epcot: Spaceship Earth (with the "Leave a Legacy" plaques) - The Magic Kingdom: Cinderella's Castle (with Walt Disney and Mickey statue) - Hollywood Studios: The Tower of Terror (with Sunset Blvd.) Instructions for anyone interested can be found here. Let me know what you think, and you can follow me on Instagram @BenBuildsLego!
  23. Hi everyone. I hope this is the right place for this. I'd like to present my first real MOC; Downton Abbey! I displayed it at Brick Bash 2020 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. It was pretty well received! You can see more about it on my blog if you're interested: http://allaboutthebricks.com/lego-downton-abbey-my-first-real-moc/
  24. Hello, I'm proud to present to you my newest MOC, Willis Tower, formerly Sears Tower, at a 1:400 scale. Pieces - 23,037 Height - 131 Centimetres (51.4") My take on the iconic Willis Tower, formerly Sears Tower. The structure of the tower itself is relatively simple as it is just the same four patterns repeated. That said, The base more than made up for the tower's lack of complexity. Featuring sloped roads and split level entrances it took a lot of trial and error and of course, time, to get to this result. I am really quite happy with how this model turned out. It was worth all the effort. I cannot wait to try my hand at more skyscrapers in the future. The Willis Tower is a 110-story 1,450-foot (442.1 m) skyscraper in Chicago, Illinois At completion in 1973, it surpassed the World Trade Center in New York City to become the tallest building in the world, a title that it held for nearly 25 years; it was also the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere for 41 years, until the new One World Trade Center surpassed it in 2014. While it held the title of "Tallest Office Building" until 2014, it lost the title of "Tallest Man-Made Structure" after only 3 years. The CN Tower in Toronto, which serves as a communications tower, took over the title in 1976. The Willis Tower is considered a seminal achievement for architect Fazlur Rahman Khan. It is currently the third-tallest building in the United States and the Western Hemisphere – and the 23rd tallest in the world. Each year, more than one million people visit its observation deck, the highest in the United States, making it one of Chicago's most popular tourist destinations. The structure was renamed in 2009 by the Willis Group as a term of its lease. More pictures can be found on my Flickr, https://www.flickr.com/photos/186855130@N08/albums/72157713216189008 -TJ
  25. Lamborghini Waffle Sauce

    Boston - Architecture Skyline

    Now that I have your attention, I'd like to present my newest MOC: A custom build of Boston, Massachusetts in the style of LEGO Architecture Skylines series From left to right: Prudential Tower, 200 Clarendon Street (John Hancock Tower), Beacon Hill, Boston Commons and Public Gardens, Massachusetts State House, Boston Customs House, Faneuil Hall, Boston Harbor, Bunker Hill Monument I was in Boston a few weeks ago, and I was inspired to create a skyline of it. It took me three weeks of many iterations to build this skyline. The piece count is higher than the usual piece count of Skylines models (over 900) because of the large scale of the buildings. The Customs House tower was the first one I built, and I could not make it smaller in any way without losing its crucial details. Everything else followed in roughly the same scale, which meant that the Prudential Tower and 200 Clarendon Street had to be extremely tall, but not exceeding the heights of the tallest official Skylines models (~32 studs). Only the Massachusetts State House is bigger than it should be, even like this it was hard to get right. 200 Clarendon Street is angled using a Technic 3-way connector and uses all manners of SNOT techniques to get the slopes on the edge, while connecting one half to the other in the plate-wide gap in the middle. This was achieved in some pieces not available in Dark Azure, such as headlight bricks and the 1x1x2 Pieces of Resistance. The bricks from this tall structure along with all the clear plates in the Prudential Tower account for more than two-thirds of the total piece count. I also copied some of the small row-houses from the new Paris and San Francisco models for the houses on Beacon Hill, as that was too Iconic to omit from a model of Boston.