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Found 35 results

  1. Hello fellow builders! I felt that it was finally time to share with you all something that I've been working on/ playing with for a while now: My L-Motor Frame. L-Motor Block Types by Nick Jackson, on Flickr The concept for this project was to create a stable platform on which (primarily) steam engines could be produced with less motor& cable obstructions. L-Motor Block Types by Nick Jackson, on Flickr This would then allow the engine's body to be built relatively free of electrical components, or crammed with them in the case of tank engines. L-Motor Block Variants by Nick Jackson, on Flickr I think that the most interesting part of the frame is the fact that it is easily modifiable, and can essentially go from 2 to 7 axles! At the time of writing this however, I've only dared to go up to 4 axles for a related project. L-Motor Block Variants (2) by Nick Jackson, on Flickr Hopefully these frames and their different gear ratios will inspire you to make a steam engine! Although, there are a great many European engines that are not steam, but employ connecting rods for their drive wheels. L-Frame with Medium-Large wheels by Nick Jackson, on Flickr Lastly, here are some alternative wheel sizes that you may be interested in. These are made possible by the work of BigBen Bricks and @Shupp. The smallest feasible size would be the Medium-Large drivers by Shupp. These would need a bit of reworking from a standard L-Frame in order to clear switches and such. New Wheels!!! (2) by Nick Jackson, on Flickr Here, a set of XL wheels from BigBen fit nicely on a standard frame. L-Frame with XXL wheels by Nick Jackson, on Flickr And, by upgrading to the longer frame size, you could even accommodate 6 of Shupp's XXL wheels! Hopefully this post will benefit everyone, but moreso people who've had a difficult time getting into trains, and especially steam! Please, let me know your thoughts, and definitely share your ideas for a potential future build that might benefit from this design! Oh, and here's the link to the files: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B9xAgBdzDImZaFFsM2lGVkdmcEk Thanks for reading, ~M_Slug357~
  2. Behold, my first large scale locomotive MOC, the EMD SD70ACe. The engine is 7 wide, and runs 48 studs in length from coupler magnet to coupler magnet. Everything is brick built, not a single sticker to be found on it. Motive power is provided from two PF Medium motors each driving an A1A wheel set. A PF receiver sits where the dynamic braking grid would be, and the battery box is accessed through the hole between the air horns. I know the locomotive number belongs to a GP-38, but it worked in the size. Given the motor locations, there wasn't any room to build the internals for the cab. And now, a shot of the internals. You can see the two PF Medium motors rather easily in here, along with the battery box and PF receiver. Given the generous length of the locomotive, I plan to upgrade it to two L motors next time I hit the LEGO store in Koln. It hauls a lot of wagons, but lacks speed. If the motor upgrade doesn't speed it up, at least I'll be able to haul a lot more. I'd like to thank everybody that's posted their MOCs up here. I've cribbed a few ideas from stuff to improve the looks.
  3. This engine is modeled after the GE 44 ton switcher locomotive. Why 44 tons, you may ask? I give you the answer from the Wikipedia article on this loco type: This locomotive's specific 44-short ton weight was directly related to one of the efficiencies the new diesel locomotives offered compared to their steam counterparts: reduced labor intensity. In the 1940s, the steam to diesel transition was in its infancy in North America, and railroad unions were trying to protect the locomotive fireman jobs that were redundant with diesel units. One measure taken to this end was the 1937 so-called "90,000 Pound Rule" :[citation needed] a stipulation that locomotives weighing 90,000 pounds (41,000 kg) – 45 short tons – or more required a fireman in addition to an engineer on common carrier railroads. Industrial and military railroads had no such stipulation. The 44-ton locomotive was born to skirt this requirement. The loco is bi-directional, and doesn't have much to differentiate between the "front" or "rear" expect for the air horn and exhaust stack on one end in real life. My LEGO model lacks these, so it's only way to tell which is front is by the headlights: clear for front, red for rear. I am going to name this loco WFP number 7007. (WFP stands for Wabash Frisco & Pacific, which is the name of a 12 inch gauge ride-on railway in St. Louis, MO.) They don't have a real 44 toner there, but do have a Fairbanks Morse H10-44 (number 704) in the same color scheme, so I made this engine as a companion to the H10-44. In the spoiler tag below, you will find a real life picture of a 44-toner loco. (I got the picture from railpictures.net, It is NOT mine!) Just for comparison purposes, here is the H10-44 I was talking about. NOTE: The H10-44 is NOT included in the GE 44-ton's LDD file! The (updated) LDD file for the GE loco is available here. Build updated 3-14-17 with a better 44 ton GE unit, courtesy of Henry Durand over on Facebook's LEGO Train Fan Club. Thanks Henry! Comments, Questions, suggestions and complaints are always welcome!
  4. Hello everybody, here are my latest creations, two (almost similar) Swedish T44 Diesel locomotives. Base measures 8wide x L32studs, and body contains: -A medium PF motor in the rear compartment, that powers a decoupling system in rear boggie. -IR receiver in drivers cab. -Std PF battery box in the front compartment. -A std PF train motor takes care of propulsion. One channel on PF controller is used for decoupling, and the other channel is used for running the PF train motor. Coulor scheme is the former standard of SJ (Swedish state railways) as: Orange / White stripe / DkBlue top. T44 is (still) the most common freight diesel locomotive in Sweden and was originally built in 123 units. I made two units with same mechanics but slightly different detailing. I made several different designs for remote decoupling, but this one is more or less borrowed from Baard, which in turn was inspired by my previous attempts. The mini LA (linear actuator) moves the magnet in and out, thus separating the loco magnet from wagon magnet for a remote controlled shunting. Any comments are welcome as usual.
  5. These diesel F7-like locos were inspired by set 10020, (Santa Fe Super Chief) and my dark bluish gray with white / light gray stripes train cars. The cab and booster units feature no interior details because I have no need for such items on my layout.. that and retrofitting all my trains with inside stuff would be quite costly. The name of this train these engine's pull is a play off the Missouri River Runner, a real train that Amtrak runs from Kansas City to St. Louis. The Meramec River runs next to the Wabash Frisco & Pacific, so I switched the name to the Meramec River Runner for my railroad. The number 7301 goes on the sides of the nose just before the windscreen, while BRS (standing for my railroad's name, Brick Railway Systems) should go in the middle of the cab unit's sides, just above the fuel tank. (I don't have all the tiles yet, so their is a blank spot for the railway name) The nose features two headlights and a split windscreen. The rear of each of the locos feature doorways to the next engine compartment, and / or the passenger train itself. Combination baggage and passenger car. (I built these cars a while ago, (about 2 years) but they needed better pictures and go with the newer diesel locomotives, so here they are.) three identical passenger coaches The observation coach of the Meramec River Runner. This car lacks the letters BRS (standing for Brick Railway Systems) but it is owned by that line. The train cars by themselves are inspired by the Wabash Frisco & Pacific passenger cars, except these are dark gray and not blue. Their is no LDD file for this train, but comments, questions, complaints, and suggestions are always welcome!
  6. Hey guys, been meaning to post this for quite some time. Here is my version (heavily based on swoofty's excellent rendition). 6 wide, unpowered riding on the famous "talltim slider trucks." Let me know what you think! Enjoy. GECX 2010 left front by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr GECX 2010 left back by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr GECX 2010 left side by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Here's a link to the flickr album: LINK. Be on the lookout for pictures of my GE ES44DC #2005 Demonstrator. -Jeffinslaw
  7. The Spirit of Legoredo was my one of my first big trains, and was built in 2011 with a baggage car, three passenger coaches, and observation car. It looked good to me at first, in nearly all black with a red stripe at the base, but over the years was quietly forgotten about, as it was quite dull-looking and hard to take pictures of. Then I switched magnet types to the newer ones, and it became even harder show off as it didn't match the rest of my newer train fleet. Eventually, the baggage car was scrapped, as the train with it's longer 28-stud base plates would not fit in my boxes with the locomotives with five cars. That will soon change though... First off, this diesel model was inspired by Valgarise and his model called "Invencible". It looked like an nice big ALCO model (and in the right colors too!) so I built it and a booster unit sometime in 2014. Since last uploading this model, I changed the grille bricks from black to dark bluish gray in order to make the engine stand out more. I also edited the short hand rails to be three studs long instead of four. The rear of the loco. The locomotive is supposed to be a American Locomotive Company (ALCO for short) diesel two unit semi-permanently coupled set. However, several differences exist between the real world and the model, so it's not a exact match. The rear of the train features four 1 x 2 macaroni bricks as the back window's curved glass. Here we see the redesigned cars which are more colorful with a red stripe around the windows down the length of the train. The whole train together. NOTE: These updates will happen probably after Christmas, but rest assured it will be finished by January / February. Here are the LDD files for the above models. ...for the engine: http://www.moc-pages...1473611680m.lxf ...for the whole train: http://www.moc-pages...1473611473m.lxf Comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome!
  8. MODS: the last topic i made on this train was long ago (2013) I thought that making a new one instead of resurrecting an old one and updating it would be better... though I could be wrong. if so, I am sorry for any trouble I have caused! The locomotive is a American Locomotive Company (ALCO for short) diesel two unit semi-permanently coupled set, with both engines assigned the same number. The front unit where the engineer sits is called a Cab (or A) unit, while the trailing unit is called a Booster (or B) unit, though they can be used in more groups than just two, like a an A-B-B-A set as used on the real life Santa Fe Super Chief, among many other trains. This feature was not unique to the ALCO family, as Baldwin, EMD, and many smaller makers such as Fairbanks - Morse did so too. However, sometimes different companies' types were difficult (or impossible) to connect together because of placement of Multiple Unit control hoses / ports. (Like a ALCO A unit leading a Baldwin B unit, a Fairbanks Morse B Unit and a EMD A unit at the rear... though it would be something to see!) This model was inspired by Valgarise and his model called "Invencible". It looked like an nice big ALCO model (and in the right colors for my railroad too!) so I built it and a booster unit sometime in early 2014 / late 2013, but i finally got around to taking decent pictures of it today! The rear of the model features the older 9v era magnets, as this loco and it's corresponding train have not been updated in some time though it's on my to-do list. The front of the loco features a single headlight and no magnet for coupling trains to the head of the engine. Their is a cool looking red stripe though! The nose of the engine as designed Flickr user Valgarise was lacking number boards, so I added some. Here you can see how I attached the nose to the rest of the loco. Here is my original inspiration by Valgarise. More awesome pictures are available in his photo stream here: https://www.flickr.c...157627755617169 Their is no LDD file for this engine at the moment, though one could be uploaded eventually. If you have any questions, complaints, or suggestions, feel free to leave it below as any feedback would be welcome! EDIT: LDD File available here: http://www.moc-pages...1472244392m.lxf
  9. Hi guys, having just recently resurfaced from my dark ages, I got set 60098 some time ago and built up a small layout (which, at the moment, merely occupies my desk and isn't even a full loop). In desperate need of a small shunting locomotive I additionally got set 3677 with the idea of shortening the locomotive. My first idea was to build a 3-axle loco, but I soon found out that the proportions would look strange if I didnt want to shorten it even further. So, in the end I decided on a 4-axle construction on 2 bogeys (just like the original 3677 loco). Some pieces are missing, so this is still a work in progress. The preliminary result looks like this: Hope you like it, quarren
  10. Right now I'm designing a updated Santa Fe train consist, hopefully to scratch the urges of the original without the hefty costs, but I want to ask a few questions before I start working on it. What parts from the original are the most expensive and difficult to buy? What are some better methods to tackle the nose without the expensive parts? I'll be posting updates and images, with LDD files as I work on this and at the end will upload to my Rebrickable, where I already host an old project.
  11. After the last boxcab, Commander Wolf and I figured we had to go smaller. And slower. So we decided that both of us should build a motorized model of a GE 23-ton boxcab. We agreed to build them models independently, then meet up and compare approaches. We started with the same scaling image: Since there was some variation among the prototypes, choice of details was a matter of taste. I took most of my references from here. Here's my finished model: The original locomotive is really tiny, so I tried to keep the model about 7 studs wide. There's a lot of SNOT in this model: The main chassis is upside-down, the deckplate and frames are held against that using Technic pins, and the body attaches to some jumpers on the deckplate: The battery box is mounted sideways in the body and the power switch is reached by jabbing an antenna through the window. The roof is actually only held on by gravity: Originally I wasn't sure if I was going to put the caution-stripe tiles on the frames, but codefox421 vouched for them. You can see the full Brickshelf gallery here. So, what did Commander Wolf do? Read on...
  12. I'm trying to design a realistically functioning model of a diesel locomotive. I don't care about looks at this point, given how limited my collection is, but what I'm wanting to aim for is a locomotive that appears to operate realistically. The chassis is going to be 6 studs wide for now as a prototype, and 46 studs long. In order of the drivetrain, it's going to be M-motor -> one way clutch -> flywheel -> forward/reverse gearbox -> trucks. This should allow the locomotive to realistically creep forward, move, and slow down gradually as if it were an actual diesel locomotive with a fluid drive transmission, or like HarmanMotor's fluid drive bus. The only problem I'm encountering so far is a compact, low friction one way clutch design. I've tried the one design made with the 3 rubber 2 stud lifters, but that doesn't work. It's too large and I can't get it to function properly without a large flywheel which wouldn't fit in the body, or base of the locomotive. I'm trying to design something compact enough you could put it inside the base or body of any diesel or electric loco, and dramatically improve the functionality. Any help?
  13. Hi guys. I built this ALCO PA and I thought, why wouldn't I show it here. Background information The ALCO PA's are A1A-A1A locomotives built to haul passenger trains by ALCO and GE. Sadly, from the nearly 300 PA's built only 7 still exist today. The PA has gone on to achieve a legendary fame in railfan circles. Because of it's tendency to belch heavy, black smoke, the PA has even been declared to be an "honorary steam locomotive". Even the late, noted train artist Howard Fogg, a big steam aficionado, once called the PA "a nice looking locomotive". What else needs to be said? My own model Last year I built a 6 studs wide ALCO PA that I didn't really like because it was small and didn't have much detail. A few weeks ago I also built an 8 studs wide steam locomotive which led to me wanting to built a diesel locomotive in that same scale ( even though the PA is a bit to large) and seeing as I already built a PA before, why not make a new one? ALCO PA #5 by RIZING!, on Flickr I think she looks fine. At least an improvement if you see my older models... Almost everything is done now. I just have to know if the drivetrain works and how I can built the bogies because I've never done any brick built bogies. ALCO PA #6 by RIZING!, on Flickr As you can see, the bogies are geared 1:1 with a large motor. But does a drivetrain like this work? The motors are static in the shell and the bogies are loose under it. ALCO PA #7 by RIZING!, on Flickr So, the L motor in the locomotive doesn't move at all while the bogies are turning when it goes around corners. So I really need to know if that isn't a problem. Also, can jumper plates keep an L motor in place? ALCO PA #8 or so by RIZING!, on Flickr And yeah, I need to make better bogies ALCO PA # 9? by RIZING!, on Flickr But really, I've never built bogies for a train so I definitely need help there. ALCO PA #10 by RIZING!, on Flickr And here a quick comparison picture of the old model (in front) and the new one (in back) Bye
  14. Hello! It's been awhile since I posted anything in this forum, but I wanted to show some of the progress I've made on a layout I've been working on by showing off the engine I'm going to use on it, namely an S1 Switcher. The engine itself still needs a bit of work on it, namely the height, but it does look nice working the harbour I've built. Building the nose of the engine proved somewhat troublesome, but I'm happy with the way it turned out. The back needs a bit of work done to it, but I'm relatively happy with the cab. The image above shows how the cab roof comes off in order to place figures inside. I've also built a transfer caboose to go alongside this engine that I hope to have posted soon. Feedback would be appreciated!
  15. I was looking at that thread about compact PF solutions, and I thought about posting this MOC. The Alco HH series is a line of very early diesel-electric switchers (made in 'Murrika of course) produced between 1931 and 1940 after which it was succeeded by the much more well-know S series. The HH1000 was the 1000HP variant of the HH series of which 34 were produced between 1939 and 1940. Because other companies' color schemes were more difficult to implement, my HH1000 carries that of Union Pacific. UP owned exactly one HH1000, numbered 1251, which it acquired from the Mount Hood Railway in the late 60s. It was probably retired not long after. The most difficult part of the prototype to implement in Lego was by far the cab. Ideally the columns at the corners of the cab would be something like 2LU x 2LU, but that is pretty much impossible in Lego. After much fiddling I was able to get 2LU gaps in the back, but the cab is too long by about a stud to accomodate 5LU columns from the side. You'll notice the PF receiver sticking out of the center window. To me the main feature of this loco is that it is the perfect shape to cram two M motors, the AA battery box, and the reciever into a body 30 studs long. The receiver is actually just floating because that's the only orientation that works. The tractive effort is a little less than what I was able to get out of the RF-16, a combination I think of less weight and shorter bogies, but for practical purposes it'll basically pull anything reasonable - just slowly. As far as I can tell having a gear ratio other than 1:1 is more or less impossible here. This model has been about 85% complete for the past month or two, mainly for testing, but I'm about to BL the remaining parts, so it should get done soon! I didn't realize dark gray/blay saber blades were so expensive; so spoiled by LDD now.
  16. Hi all, I've been doing a bit of brainstorming about what to do concerning the current state of affairs for trains on Lego Ideas, and while I am currently working on a couple different solutions of my own, I finally landed on an idea that would include all of you as well. A bit of friendly competition, all towards a common goal: a better/more appealing train set offering for Lego fans. So, I am proposing we start a set design contest here on Eurobricks!! (maybe even get it up on the front page?) The Parameters: -A complete train set, not a standalone car, engine, or track-side structure. Generally an engine, 2-3 rolling stock, and one structure. -A 1000 parts count maximum, which must include necessary PF elements and at least 20 pieces of track (standard oval). -A self-contained engine, meaning no rolling stock can carry necessary PF elements. -At least 2-3 "play features", not including the operation of the train itself. -At least one alternate build. (Alternate models do not have to meet the same requirements as the primary model) -Must use parts currently in production, however new/different colors of said parts can be used. Some Suggestions: -Come up with a few stories about what the minifigs included in the set could and would be doing. -Try to avoid using generic flat cars and wimpy helicopters. -Use 1-2 rare/unique colors that haven't appeared in a train set yet, like azure, purple, dark red, etc. -Try not to make your train too regionally specific by using road names such as GWR, LNER, UP, CN, etc. Color schemes may be mimicked though. -Develop a play feature that hasn't been used in a train set before. -Try to have each element of the set be as interesting on its own as it is with the rest of the set. I'm not sure how much time should be given to a contest like this, but I'd reckon about 30-90 days would be about right? Then, about 2-4 weeks for voting? The top 3-5 projects (depending on the amount of participants) could then be refined a bit before submitting to Lego Ideas. If this contest receives frontpage support, maybe some prizes could be awarded to the top finalists...? Let me know your thoughts on my proposition, and also who I need to contact to make this happen! Thanks for your time, ~M_Slug~
  17. The following creations were made with help from about five people, not including myself. Please see each model for more details. The steam switcher was originally a model by Scotnick, which had no working pistons and was colored white and red. I borrowed some pistons from one of HunterDobbs' engines, and now have added updated saddle tanks courtesy of Canvas Rails / TF Twitch. (Canvas made the original 0-4-0 design where the tank originated, which TF Twitch recreated, this leading to the adding of it to this 0-6-0.) Oh, and by the way: the gears on the steamer are standing in for six Big Ben Bricks medium steam engine drivers. (four flanged, two blind) The rear of the engine features warp-around stripe design. The number of the engine goes on the four studs, while BRS goes on the three studs. The diesel was designed by Flickr member "RIZING!" and modified by me to be little taller and come in tan. I also removed some parts that are unavailable in black. The diesel could be motorized with either 9V or PF motors and associated items. Also, I must say I really like the stairs at both ends of the engine that RIZING! designed. The rear of the switcher now has three tail-lights. The number of the engine goes on the four studs, while the three studs is reserved for the letters BRS. I will be building these locos sometime early next year.
  18. Boxcab Shunter Hi guys, I've just finished a new Power Functions boxcab locomotive. I hope you guys like it. It was my first ever Power Functions MOC and I think it came out quite well. Here are the specs length: 16 bricks (with couplings) hight: 11 plates colour: yellow motor: PF train motor battery box: AAA weight: 314,1 gram But without further ado, Here are some pictures of it! Front view side view Motor How I hid the battery box And how I hid the reciever the only problem is that it doesn't have any wagons... And I have zero idea about what to build for it. I thought about some giant boat trailer or a flatbed but I scrapped those ideas. Bye
  19. A British Rail Class 08 Diesel shunter, motorised with power functions BR 7 by Golem Lord, on Flickr BR 8 by Golem Lord, on Flickr BR 3 by Golem Lord, on Flickr BR 1 by Golem Lord, on Flickr Easy removal of roof to access on/off switch. Please comment below!
  20. The engines were Inspired by Facebook user Leonard Blevins' diesel engine, from which I built my own version. I think it looks like a Electro-Motive Division F40PH, which was (in real life) mainly built for Amtrak. Also, the letters BRS go on the side of the cab below the windows on the 3 exposed studs, while the number of the engine (8773 for example,) go on the 4 studs below the windows. Also, I know there is no such thing as a B unit for a F40PH. But since this is pretty much fictional already, I added one. I colored the engine the way it is to compliment set 60052: Cargo Train. As the engine in the set is freight, this one is passenger based. I even kept the windows the same light blue color, and yellow warning stripes on the cab end to compliment each other. Speaking of the cab, the roof is removable to place the engineer inside at the controls. This also increases play-ability. Here we see the F40PH's front. I added safety stripes because they looked nice, and I had some spares I thought would look nice there. The whole build was inspired by this piece from Leonard Blevins diesel: http://alpha.brickli...age?P=30022#T=C Here is the view inside the cab with the roof removed. (sorry for the blurry picture!) The B unit does not have a removable roof, or interior, for that matter. the rear of the engine features a walkway to the train. Here is the fancy sloped rear observation car of the express passenger train. The passenger cars are not yet ordered. LDD file for the engine by itself: http://www.mocpages.com/user_images/80135/1441300586m.lxf Well, what do you think? EDIT: added train cars, new engine and new ldd file. If a MOD could change the title to "F40PH diesels with express passenger train" it would be much appreciated. EDIT #2: change train color to blue and added new ldd file. EDIT #3: Added real life pictures!
  21. A brand new custom lego Freight Train made in LDD. I can't seem to upload the screenshots here. Check out the screenshots on MOCpages: [link removed: self promotion]
  22. Behold: the diesel units that broke the back of the steam engines... Built by General Motors (GM) / Electro Motive Division (EMD) in 1939, this is the diesel that showed the way to the future, signaling the start of the diesel era. However, as one day must start, another must end. This two A & two B locomotive set got the ball rolling towards the end of steam as mainline workhorses (and eventually regulated to excursion trains, infrequent freight moves, and museums) by pulling a modern two steam engines backwards - while said engines were at full forward throttle. Anyway, this particular engine was originally owned by Electro-Motive as a demonstrator. It was sold to Southern Railway and eventually the cab unit was placed in the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri. It was repainted in it's original Electro Motive colors for it's journey to Railfair '91 held in Sacramento, California. It is currently on display once more in the St. Louis Museum of Transportation. The B unit was given to the Virginia Museum of Transportation, and was also present at the 1991 rail fair. It is currently on loan to the St. Louis Museum for connection with the original A unit for five years (in return for the loan of 2-8-8-2 steam Norfolk & Western 2156 to Roanoke) Front view. Please note, all the printed tiles are missing from the engine. The numbers "103" should go near thew windscreen, while "ELECTRO MOTIVE" should go on the sides of the cab unit. The initials "GM" should go on the nose of the engine, on top of those two yellow 1x2 jumpers. rear view. I want to use this part for the exhaust fans instead of the ones shown: http://alpha.brickli...P=15535pb01#T=C Here are the units in McCook Illinois 1989. (NOT my picture, I just found it on Flickr. Photo taken by user Bill Johnson) The LDD file is available: http://www.mocpages....1437180710m.lxf Comments, questions, and complaints are welcome! EDIT: You are probably wondering why I dragged this model out of the dark abyss known as my hard-drive: I needed the model to be updated to the standard set by my Santa Fe Bluebonnet engines so i can carefully consider which to get... if either at all. EDIT #2: I forgot to add this to the LDD file / pictures, but it should be pretty easy to figure out how to build it. This plaque is supposed to have this printed on it: http://alpha.bricklink.com/pages/clone/catalogitem.page?P=3068bpb0655#T=C This clip-and-tile setup is supposed to replicate the National Engineering Landmark plaque on EMD FT 103's A Unit. it is usually placed on the rear doorway, and clips onto the two railings beside the door, whereupon it fits quite well. (just like the real thing) I don't have the plaque 's wording memorized and can't seem to find it on the web. You'll just have to visit the engine yourself in St. Louis to find out what it says!
  23. I have motorized my 7939-inspired MOC and added a new engine inspired by early Box-cab diesels. This is my first couple of motorized MOCs ever, and I'm not sure I did it quite right. I won't be building them, but if anyone wants to take a crack at them be my guest. Here is the front view. The yellow engine is also build able in red or black, while the blue engine is also build able in white. The cab on the yellow engine opens up, but the blue loco is inaccessible at this time. It may be possible to fix this, but it would require a roof redesign and I don't feel like redoing the engine (again) right now... Here we see the innards of the engines: The triple A Battery box and IR receiver. There are two 2x2 holes in the frame of the engine for a PF cord to the motor. No lights are included, but it may be possible to make them fit inside if you really wanted to. The roof sections that are hidden in this picture are removable, and are held on by four studs each. LDD file: http://www.mocpages.com/user_images/80135/1432672946m.lxf As I said above, these are my first motorized models, so please tell me if I did something wrong. Also, Comments, Questions, & Complains are always welcome!
  24. Well another month another MOC! This is actually my first non-steam loco MOC, and, as far as I know, the first Lego model of this loco as well. Produced between 1950 and 1953, the RF-16 was an early diesel electric locomotive built by the soon to be extinct Baldwin Locomotive Works. While the RF-16 is typically synonymous with Baldwin's awesome "sharknose" trim (the main reason I wanted to model this loco), the styling had already been used on the earlier DR-6-4-20 and DR 4-4-15. 160 RF-16s served on the B&O, NYC, and PRR for about 10 to 15 years, though two units were running on the D&H up into the late 70s, and I believe the pair are still stored on some shortline in the boonies today. I've ordered parts to build at least one unit in a PRR black with pinstripe livery (the pinstripe and livery will probably be a sticker) - I would have really liked to do dark red with pinstripes, but dark red doesn't come on nearly enough parts. The part I'm least happy about is the windshield; Lego just doesn't have the resolution and doesn't make anything in the right shape to capture that funny windshield shape. From the start this unit was designed to run on PF unlike my T1 tender where the PF was kind of an afterthough. I've got two M motors geared 1:1 powered by the big battery box. The grate at the rear of the loco is a ladder such that you can shoot PF signals to the receiver behind it. And finally you can see some of the shenanigans used in the sharknose. Since I didn't have to mess with a complicated articulated chassis as in a steam loco, I haven't actually built any of this in brick, so it'll be interesting to see what happens when parts come. I'm also still debating whether to build two A units or an A-B set...
  25. I have been continually modifying the steamer for 11 years, the diesel for 4 years, and the coaches for almost a decade. The steamer and coaches were produced by my father, while the diesel is a MOD of another person's BR class 08. The steamer is getting new number-plates, working pistons, and drivers soon instead of the original model's 9V-era wheels. The diesel is getting cosmetically updated with a new number, and the coaches are (basically) staying the same. 0-4-0 steam switcher MOC This push-along copy of the engine in set 7722 was my gateway into Lego trains. I later added a My Own Train (set 3741) style tender, a new boiler, and so on. I am now adding working pistons (thanks to Hunter Dobbs!) and numbers to the sides of the engine and tender. The engine has gears as stand-ins for medium Big Ben Bricks wheels. BRS goes on the tender, while 5972 goes on the engine. The number of the engine is a tribute to "Olton Hall" (No. 5972) or "Hogwarts Castle" from the Harry Potter films. I really liked that engine when I was little. Fictional background for the steamer: Built in 1929 by Baldwin Locomotive Works for Brick Railway Systems (BRS), engine #5972 was supposed to be part of a 55-strong engine order, but the Great Depression started, causing BRS to cancel the last eight engines, leaving 5972 the last of it's class. The type has been painted in standard black with a red stripe. LDD file for the steamer: http://www.mocpages....1430843115m.lxf BR Class 09 Diesel switcher MOD I borrowed this British diesel design from Eurobricks user ChromeKnight in 2011, and made it in real life for Christmas of that year. This model was my introduction to Studs Not On Top (also known as SNOT) and has been very helpful to me over the years. The rear features three tail-lights. The number of this engine (8311) is the reverse of it's original number, 1138, to better fit with my numbering scheme for my trains. Fictional background for this diesel: In 1960, Brick Railway Systems (also known as BRS) was trying to find a good multipurpose (yet small) diesel switcher. It noticed the success of the British Railways ' Class 08 and so BRS asked the English railway if they would be willing to part with some about 10 Class 08's. The British took their time, but responded with one better: Class 09's, which have a higher speed of about 28 Miles per hour. Desperate for relief for their strained steam switchers, BRS said yes, and in April 1963, ten Class 09's made the journey across the Atlantic Ocean to BRS, whereupon they were numbered 8310 to 8320 and painted black with a single red stripe. LDD file for the diesel: http://www.mocpages....1430843320m.lxf Two-Axle passenger coaches These cars were inspired by two 4.5V sets: set 7722 "Steam Cargo Train, Battery"'s mail car & set 7715, "Push-Along Passenger Steam Train" and it's two passenger cars. My dad built these for me in the early 2000's. I added a passageway through the front of the mail / baggage car to allow the conductor to do his duties and made the bright colors of the original train more subdued with good ol' Brick Railway Systems black with a red stripe. The rear of the baggage car has room for the letters BRS, standing for Brick Railway Systems. LDD file for the coaches: http://www.mocpages....1430843654m.lxf Well, until I get real pictures taken of these, that's it for these. Any thoughts? EDIT: added the fictional backgrounds for the diesel and the steam engine.