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Found 4 results

  1. Sequential AWD 4-speed gearbox with V8 fake engine Features - AWD with center differential - Sequential 4-speed gearbox - One-finger shifter - V8 fake engine This gearbox is an excerpt from my rugged supercar project. The mid-console has an important role in the overall stiffness of that model. It had to be narrow as well. If you build (have built) it, you will also notice it has very little torsional flex. I wanted a 4-speed sequential gearbox covering a wide range of ratios. So not something like 1:2.5 upto 1:1, but rather something like 1:3:5 upto 1:0.8. Another requirement I had, was that I didn't want red clutch gears to transfer drive on axles rotating at different RPM. This is a common practice, but from modding the Porsche I know it induces a lot of friction on the axles involved. When not engaged, red clutch gears better only make dummy rotations and not transfer drive. And finally, all had to fit underneath the engine; I didn't want the gearbox to be routed through the entire chassis. Instructions available on Rebrickable.com. Have fun!
  2. Rugged supercar - Hammerhead (1:9 scale) This project was not something I started very consciously. Also for me it evolved into something special. I was especially happy with the interference (in a positive way) of other builders. A big thank you to this community, for pushing me in the right direction on several occasions! The most special part - to me - of this build, is the chassis. It combines a simple 4-speed AWD transmission, a flawless sequential shifting mechanism and advanced suspension setups with Ackermann steering, anti-roll bars, torsion bars, 2 studs ground clearance and 2 studs suspension travel. All wrapped together in a very flat yet rigid and coherent structure with a mid-console width of only 5 studs. I did not want the bodywork to make any compromises to these features. I wanted the body to continue the line of durability set in by the chassis. Flex-axles do not fit that image, hence no wheel arcs. They would also sit 2 studs above the hood - not very elegant. The result is a car that does not only look fool-proof; it is fool-proof. After a rough treatment, you don't need to tighten connections or fine-tune gears to avoid friction. You can carry the car by the sides, by the trunk door (rear wing), by the nose and by the bumpers without displacing any parts. You can even grab the 2Kg build by the roof and turn it upside down to see the bottom side without a problem. So I did not intend to level with great bodywork builders. To me the biggest compliment is that some have referred to this model as the successor of 8865 and 8880. Drive train AWD with 3 differentials Sequential 4-speed gearbox One-finger shifter V8 fake engine Suspension Double wishbone suspension Anti-roll bars (front & rear) 2 studs suspension travel 2 studs ground clearance Steering Ackermann steering Gear-rack sliders Working steering wheel HoG steering Chassis Sturdy and durable Integrated bumpers Adjustable seats Narrow mid-console (5L) Bodywork Sturdy and durable Integrated roll-cage Lockable doors Openable trunk Liftable By the roof By the sides By the nose By the trunk door Instructions are available on Rebrickable. There is a full-featured version called 'Rugged supercar' and a chassis-only version called 'Flat AWD chassis'. The chassis-only version confines itself to part 1 of the instructions of the full-featured version. Special thanks to @Blakbird and @BusterHaus - with Blakbird being the driving force - for taking on the task of making these beautiful instructions! Making instructions for a build like this is a tremendous amount of work. Even more so, given the fact that I have been very demanding in sticking to my original design. - 32005a (Link 1 x 6 without Stoppers) - used for the anti-roll bars and steering tie rods - is preferred over 32005b (Link 1 x 6 with Stoppers), because each link has tow-balls inserted from both sides. 32005b can be used too, but in that case each link will have one tow-ball that needs quite some force to insert. - 32056 (Liftarm 3 x 3 L-Shape Thin) - used for the door locks - is preferred over 32249 (Liftarm 3 x 3 L-Shape with Quarter Ellipse Thin). 32249 can be used too, but makes it more likely to accidentally lock the door while it's open, which is not a big deal of course. - 76138 (Shock Absorber 6.5L with Soft Spring) - used for the door locks - should be soft springs. They are quite rare in red, but you could also use two LBG soft springs. - 85543 (Rubber Belt Small (Round Cross Section) - used for the 90 degree limiter and the return-to-center of the gear shifter - should be relatively new, say max 2 years. Not that they wear out quickly, but the older ones are slightly less tight. Images of the full-featured version can be found here. Images of the chassis-only version can be found here. LXF-file of the full-featured version (with placeholders for the Porsche wheel hubs!) can be found here. LXF-file of the chassis-only version (with placeholders for the Porsche wheel hubs!) can be found here. See the entry on The LEGO Car Blog! P.S. Where real cars start with a sketch, evolve into a professional design and finally have their technical details filled-in, this project started with some technical details, evolved into a complete design and ended up in a sketch ;-). By @HorcikDesigns (http://horcikdesigns.deviantart.com/gallery/).
  3. If you don't like things that use axles as torsion bars, then please skip this topic. In the march of steppers, shifters and limiters, here's my throw at a 90 degree stepper without silicon or rubber. I started off with my compact 90 degree stepper which uses silicon bands for returning the shift lever as well as for limiting the shift axle to 90 degree orientations. Because the rotation movements that had to be limited are quite small (max 10 degrees), using axles as torsion bars seemed to be a valid option that wouldn't put too much stress on the axles involved. After some trial and error I found a setup that actually works. It uses 3L axles with knob and half pins (also with knob) with a flat round 1x1 tile attached to them as stoppers and pole reverser handles as torsion levers. In idle state, there's practically no torsion stress on any of the involved axles. Only when you pull the shift lever, the axles get twisted, but not more than about 10 degrees for the shift lever and even less for the 90 degree limiter. The casing had to be made quite strong to prevent any other bending then the intended axle torsion. LXF-file here.
  4. Scattered over the last few months I've been working on a proof of concept of an improved paddle shifter unit for the Porsche 911 GT3 RS (42056) that uses the stepping principle from Attika's stepper. After several redesigns I finally came up with something that I'm so content with - because of its reliability and sturdyness - that I thought it would not only be valuable as a 42056 MOD but could be of interest to other car builders too. Just like Attika's stepper this setup relies on the interaction with a 90 degree indexer. And just like the orginal 42056 unit it makes use of silicon bands to return the paddles. I tried to hide the silicon bands inside the unit, but that would give too much unbalanced stress to the whole shifting system. The operation is optimal when the bands are close to the paddles. About the operation of the shifters: Each paddle pulls a pusher against a central knob gear independently. When the central knob gear gets pushed over the 45 degree point the 90 degree indexer takes over and completes the 90 degree step. This completion makes the knob gear push the pusher outwards, which allows the pusher to be pulled back into it's starting postion by the silicon band. While being pulled back, the 5x7 frames to the sides of the unit (with their smooth sides facing outwards!!!) make sure the pusher is pulled back inwards too. The video shows a setup that mimics the situation in the Porsche, with the 90 degree indexer integrated in the gearbox. When combined with the indexer, the unit itself can be used in the original Porsche as is. Feel free to add comments or post (suggestions for) improvements. LXF-file here.