Beck

[MOC/WIP] EH800 JRF

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Posted (edited)

Hello everyone!

Let’s start with some information about the real train. The EH800 was introduced into service in 2014 just before the Hokkaido Shinkansen service commenced in 2016. The line utilizes the Seikan Tunnel, which connects the island of Hokkaido to the mainland (Honshu). For the Shinkansen trains to be able to operate through the tunnel, the electrification was changed from 20kV to 25kV.  Therefore, a new freight locomotive was needed to replace the EH500 that could operate at the two voltages. 

Now here’s the really interesting part; JR has been testing the feasibility of the loading the narrow gauge container cars on to larger standard gauge covered cars allowing for higher speeds through the tunnel.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Train_on_Train

About the design: 
All bogies are powered by M motors with the option of upgrading three to L motors if more torque is required since the L motor and M motor have nearly identical rpms at 9V (272 vs 275). The fourth M motor cannot be upgraded to an L motor because it is mounted vertically to allow for the battery box (buwizz). The bogies were also designed to run on 3 wide track to better replicate the 3ft 6in (1067mm) gauge. 

EH800 - 1

Here's quite a useful technique I discovered for coupler mountings. Alternatively, I could have mounted the coupler and lower frame assembly directly to the bogie; however, I just don’t like how that assembly would look when the bogie is turned. The coupler can be attached to the brown plate with hole, which is connected to the 2x2 bracket inverted in green. The two blue 3L bars are connected to the headlight bricks in black and to a 1x2 plate rounded (#35480) that is hidden from view. 

EH800 Frontal Coupler Technique

800x600.jpg

 

I used my old ME models R104 rails in conjunction with the newer Bricktracks R104s to create dual gauge track.

800x432.jpg

 

800x600.jpg

 

What's left:

- paint the 3D printed wheels light gray

-continue the stripe around the front of the cab

 

 

 

Here are some reference images/videos:

7050e9179ba33317545bb51bdb6228b85b9b7d7e

 

Edited by Beck

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Posted (edited)

Nice work. Looks maybe 2-3 studs too short, though?

I honestly forgot Japan still moved freight via rail.

Love the dual gauge track.

Edited by SteamSewnEmpire

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, SteamSewnEmpire said:

Nice work. Looks maybe 2-3 studs too short, though?

I honestly forgot Japan still moved freight via rail.

Love the dual gauge track.

EH800-6.jpg

Thank you! According to wikipedia the length of the entire train is 25000mm. That scales to 69.4 studs in 1:45. Each Locomotive is 34 studs long with a two stud gap between them. Pictures can be deceiving. I should also mention that the locomotive (#901) pictured in the original post is the preproduction prototype.

Edited by Beck

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I love the loco.  Just to let you know if you look through my faves on my flickr page(link in signature) there is a great looking brick built custom track which includes switches, curves and streght track. 

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Brilliant job with the model. Great details, shaping and functionality seeing as it runs on 5-wide tracks. The face shaping is really well done. 

 

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Wonderful! Great model! It's the first time I've seen 5wide tracks.

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2 hours ago, Coal Fired Bricks said:

I love the loco.  Just to let you know if you look through my faves on my flickr page(link in signature) there is a great looking brick built custom track which includes switches, curves and streght track. 

Thanks very much! Are you referring to steve5010? The tiles connected with a single 1x1 tile with clip look quite weak. I'm not sure if they were built to look good or to run real train on them.

 

 

55 minutes ago, LEGOTrainBuilderSG said:

Brilliant job with the model. Great details, shaping and functionality seeing as it runs on 5-wide tracks. The face shaping is really well done. 

 

 

4 minutes ago, LEGO Train 12 Volts said:
Five studs wide is an absolute novelty for me
Ingenious solution and very nice final result! :wub:
 

 

8 minutes ago, Asper said:

Wonderful! Great model! It's the first time I've seen 5wide tracks.

Thanks very much! I have another Japanese train that I'm working on now that also runs on 5 wide track. If I ever get serious about creating more of a layout, I'll probably design my own track and 3d print it. The design is not quite final yet, so stay tuned. :wink:

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33 minutes ago, Asper said:

Wonderful! Great model! It's the first time I've seen 5wide tracks.

5w is, IMO, the best way to represent Cape Gauge.

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Posted (edited)
18 minutes ago, SteamSewnEmpire said:

5w is, IMO, the best way to represent Cape Gauge.

Absolutely! Anything below 1000mm, such as, Swedish 3ft (891mm) should be 4 stud track.

 

I totally forgot to ask; any ideas on how to paint the wheels? Spray paint vs model paints? 

Edited by Beck

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8 minutes ago, Beck said:

Absolutely! Anything below 1000mm, such as, Swedish 3ft (891mm) should be 4 stud track.

 

I totally forgot to ask; any ideas on how to paint the wheels? Spray paint vs model paints? 

The wheels are 3d printed? Uh... not sure. I usually dye Lego parts, but I don't know how that would work on the plastic used in 3d printing. 

Vinyl dye is amazing stuff.

https://www.amazon.com/HI-TECH-Plastic-Carpet-Leather-Upholstery/dp/B08BPFG95F/ref=sr_1_20?dchild=1&keywords=VHT+Vinyl+Dye&qid=1595749142&sr=8-20

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5 minutes ago, SteamSewnEmpire said:

I usually dye Lego parts

I'm not familiar with that process, could you explain?

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Just now, Beck said:

I'm not familiar with that process, could you explain?

There are two ways to do it.

One is using a boil-in dye like RIT. The problem with this is that a) you cannot dye dark parts lighter, b) it doesn't always soak in that well, and c) there is a high chance of damaging the parts in the hot pan.

The other method - which I linked - involves what is called vinyl dye. The is intended for plastics inside automobiles when repairs are made. It sprays on like spray paint, but is actually absorbed into the plastic, changing its color. As a result, it us pretty much impervious to wearing or flaking like with normal paint.

It works excellently on Lego - paticularly the black dye - but I have no clue how it would do with 3d printed plastics. Still, if you want permanence, that's the way to go.

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Nice work, especially on the trucks and the couplers - but what part is it that holds the axles in between the wheels and the gearing? Can't really make it out, it's a tad bit too dark with all the black.

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The engine looks great, but the engineering looks even more impressive, powering anything with less than 4 studs between the wheels is very tricky.

 

5 hours ago, Amoreternum said:

Nice work, especially on the trucks and the couplers - but what part is it that holds the axles in between the wheels and the gearing? Can't really make it out, it's a tad bit too dark with all the black.

I'm curious about the same thing, could you show more detail on the frames for the wheels?

 

 

Only thought I have is that your coupler assembly appears to rely strictly on the clutch power of two studs at a couple of locations. If you are pulling a light train probably not an issue (especially if you already know it works from experience, grin), but that was the first thing that struck me when I saw the design.

 

 

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As a Japanese Railway fan, I can say this is truly awesome and fantastic!! A big good job! I love it.

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8 hours ago, SteamSewnEmpire said:

There are two ways to do it.

One is using a boil-in dye like RIT. The problem with this is that a) you cannot dye dark parts lighter, b) it doesn't always soak in that well, and c) there is a high chance of damaging the parts in the hot pan.

The other method - which I linked - involves what is called vinyl dye. The is intended for plastics inside automobiles when repairs are made. It sprays on like spray paint, but is actually absorbed into the plastic, changing its color. As a result, it us pretty much impervious to wearing or flaking like with normal paint.

It works excellently on Lego - paticularly the black dye - but I have no clue how it would do with 3d printed plastics. Still, if you want permanence, that's the way to go.

Thanks for the info!

 

6 hours ago, Amoreternum said:

Nice work, especially on the trucks and the couplers - but what part is it that holds the axles in between the wheels and the gearing? Can't really make it out, it's a tad bit too dark with all the black.

Its a technic brick 1x2 with two axle holes. I'll make a better render of just the bogie soon.

 

1 hour ago, zephyr1934 said:

The engine looks great, but the engineering looks even more impressive, powering anything with less than 4 studs between the wheels is very tricky.

It was very difficult, but it runs flawlessly.

 

1 hour ago, zephyr1934 said:

Only thought I have is that your coupler assembly appears to rely strictly on the clutch power of two studs at a couple of locations. If you are pulling a light train probably not an issue (especially if you already know it works from experience, grin), but that was the first thing that struck me when I saw the design.

I forgot to add that I included three plate 1x2 rounded to secure the 3L bars. Believe it or not, the connection is really strong. 

 

31 minutes ago, SamuelYsc said:

As a Japanese Railway fan, I can say this is truly awesome and fantastic!! A big good job! I love it.

It's nice to see another Japanese Railway enthusiast outside of Japan.

 

26 minutes ago, A_Eurobricks_User said:

Nice work!

Thanks!

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Never seen such a small train.
Looks great, nice, clean, and a lot of details

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23 hours ago, Beck said:

It's nice to see another Japanese Railway enthusiast outside of Japan.

Yea! Me too! Just wondering did you have any other Japan's Train MOC?

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21 hours ago, neonic said:

Never seen such a small train.
Looks great, nice, clean, and a lot of details

Thanks! 70x8 studs is hardly small. :wink:

23 minutes ago, SamuelYsc said:

Yea! Me too! Just wondering did you have any other Japan's Train MOC?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/152818020@N02/49709201293/in/dateposted/

I'm also working on an EF64 1000 which will likely be finished sometime in September.

 

 

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16 hours ago, Beck said:

I'm also working on an EF64 1000 which will likely be finished sometime in September.

Although I am not a big fan of the National railway but it looks so damn cool! I like it!

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On 7/27/2020 at 9:05 PM, Beck said:

Thanks! 70x8 studs is hardly small. :wink:

Your'e right, don't know what I was thinking / doing :look:
 

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22 hours ago, Jerry McGlade said:

Really cool build! Really like the gear system!

Thanks!

12 hours ago, SamuelYsc said:

Although I am not a big fan of the National railway but it looks so damn cool! I like it!

Are you referring to "the National Railway" as an organization or as the JNR 489 series train? Glad you like it!

48 minutes ago, neonic said:

Your'e right, don't know what I was thinking / doing :look:
 

:thumbup:

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