Search the Community

Showing results for tags '1:25'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Frontpage, Forum Information and General LEGO Discussion
    • Guest Section - PLEASE READ BEFORE YOU REGISTER!
    • Frontpage News
    • Forum Information and Help
    • General LEGO Discussion
  • Themes
    • LEGO Licensed
    • LEGO Star Wars
    • LEGO Historic Themes
    • LEGO Action and Adventure Themes
    • LEGO Pirates
    • LEGO Sci-Fi
    • LEGO Town
    • LEGO Train Tech
    • LEGO Technic and Model Team
    • LEGO Mindstorms and Robotics
    • LEGO Scale Modeling
    • LEGO Action Figures
    • Special LEGO Themes
  • Special Interests
    • The Military Section
    • Minifig Customisation Workshop
    • LEGO Digital Designer and other digital tools
    • Brick Flicks & Comics
    • LEGO Mafia and Role-Play Games
    • LEGO Media and Gaming
  • Eurobricks Community
    • Hello! My name is...
    • LEGO Events and User Groups
    • Buy, Sell, Trade and Finds
    • Community
    • Culture & Multimedia

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


What is favorite LEGO theme? (we need this info to prevent spam)


Which LEGO set did you recently purchase or build?


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Country


Special Tags 1


Special Tags 2


Special Tags 3


Special Tags 4


Special Tags 5


Special Tags 6


Country flag

Found 2 results

  1. 1. Hi everyone. I’m new here but I have been building with LEGO-bricks for quite a long time. Hence this short story about my LEGO past. The theme, as far as you can call it a theme, what I’m working on is building buildings on a scale of 1:25. Why on that scale? Because it is indeed quite different from the general scale that is now called minifig scale. That is mainly due to the time I got my first LEGO as a child. That pretty much coincided with the moment LEGO sets were on sale for the first time in The Netherlands. The box I got was one of those boxes in which the bricks were neatly laid together as chocolates in a chocolates box. As a child, I found those doors and windows far too small and soon I made these door openings twice as wide and eight bricks high. This made my buildings far more playable. Later on, I found out that the width to height ratio of this self-made door opening 1:2.4 was, which corresponded reasonable well with real doors in real buildings. The height of the door was eight layers or 76.8 mm. Compared to the usual door height of 2 meters, that gives a ratio of 1:26. I made it 1:25 because that calculated a bit easier. Due to the limitations that the LEGO-parts give you, you sometimes have to ‘give and take’ when it comes to the exact scale of your MOC. The second reason of not building in minifig scale is that in those days minifigs simply did not exist. They came into play much later on, in a time I was in my so-called ‘dark ages’. I am regularly asked why I am not going to build on minifig scale. The only explanation is that I simply can’t handle the length/with ratio of the minifig. Take the height and then the width is not right. Take the width and then de length is not good. Keep the aspect ratio of the minifig and you get a distorted picture of your MOC. Nevertheless, I have seen very great and beautiful buildings and layouts on a minifig scale. Those builders then roughly holds a scale of 1:40. The minifig would in reality be 160 cm high and 64 cm wide. And it is accepted that medieval cottages have a ceiling of 4 meters in height. So, forget the ‘scale’ of minifig scale and look at the creativity of it… Miniland scale would be another alternative. There are some builders who are active on this scale and archive very nice results. The disadvantage is that you quickly have to deal with very large dimensions with buildings other than houses. The costs then will rise very quickly and transport to events will be an insurmountable problem. By the way, Miniland scale is also taken broadly, and often varies between 1:22 and 1:13, depending on the size of the real building. Easy to calculate if you count the layers of the door height. In the meantime, I’m so used to my “own” scale of 1:25 that I almost automatically feel whether the proportions are right or not. So, I’m not going to change that scale. I think, it is a good average between minifig scale and miniland scale. Maybe, it is a pity that I cannot use figures on my buildings. Certainly no minifigs. Normally, I don’t think those figurines are that important. But they do bring more liveliness and viewing pleasure, especially for the kids. And it gives a feel for the ratio and size of a building. The only LEGO-figurines that fit in in terms of proportion are the little dolls from the Belville series. With their height of 75 mm, they correspond reasonably to the human size. So that explains the presence of those figurines on some of my buildings on LEGO-events. Although there are also many visitors who do not recognize the little dolls as LEGO-figurines and sometimes even think that it is Playmobil. Anyway, then there is something to explain…
  2. Hello Everybody Im happy to introduce you my Liebherr R 980 excavator scalemodel 1:25. The whole excavator is fully motorized with power functions. The goal was to combine the motorized technic world with the usual lego bricks. Was not that easy because of the weight. This beauty will be for ever with me, thats why i also builded up a box as you can see on the pictures. Let me know what you think. :-) Best Regards from Zürich Switzerland. Dani 0 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0 2 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-1 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-3 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-2 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-5 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-6 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-4 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-12 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-13 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-14 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-7 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-8 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-9 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-10 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-11 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-15 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-16 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-17 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-18 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 0-19 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr