Pinnacle

Eurobricks Vassals
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About Pinnacle

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    Ancient
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    No sets but only MOC's

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    Male
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    All lego parts

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    The Netherlands

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  1. Pinnacle

    Unpopular Opinions about LEGO

    That is the same I do. But is is not always what I really want. Indeed, I meant arch, of course. Sorry for the wrong word.. For me, the same. So far, I have not used fake parts, mostly because there are no counterfeit parts I can use. But I’m afraid that I cannot withstand the temptation if there are useful parts with the same quality as real LEGO-parts and TLC do not make them.
  2. Pinnacle

    Unpopular Opinions about LEGO

    It brings me to another question. Let's say any company decides to create "lego" with parts different from the parts TLC makes. For example, I'd like uneven bricks. Especially uneven bow shapes like bow 1x5, 1x7. And bigger bows. In short, more variations. If that happens, would you use these 'fake' parts in your MOC? And how far do you want to go with that?
  3. Pinnacle

    Unpopular Opinions about LEGO

    I think that most LEGO-fans dislike the old Belville-sets, apparently because of the fairy-tell appearance of the figurines. And because they were made for girls only. But I like them, for the (for me) right scale and the flexibility of the limbs. One can put them in every pose you want. If these figurines were more gender-neutral, I think they had had a chance to become more popular…
  4. Pinnacle

    Buildings, scale 1:25, created by Pinnacle

    Tower of Babel IV Design. So that was the plan. Now there's the realisation. I started with some pencil sketches to see what the best approach would be. After I got the first impression, I started working on the computer. There are a few fixed starting points. At first, the dimensions of the various LEGO parts. For me, that was the Brick, Arch 1 x 12 x 3. This element was decisive for the entire dimension of the structure. And to a large extent, also determines the measurements between various building parts. The buttresses' measures, pilasters, and the intermediate counterparts were added to the span of the arch. And this resulted in a centre-to-centre size of 16 studs. This means a grid plan of 16 studs in both the x-direction and the y-direction. Next point was the size of the Tower. Breughel's painting shows eight tiers. Or rather, the gallery wallows around the core of the Tower eight times. It means that there are 16 distances of 16 studs and the length is thus 256 studs, i.e. 2048 mm. The angle of the slope remains the same over the height of the Tower. Namely an increase of 8 studs horizontally and one brick high. The height (in completed condition) is therefore fixed. Namely 16 + 2x15 + 14 bricks is 60 bricks high for the first tour. That height naturally decreases as the circumference becomes smaller. Eventually, the Tower will be 256 bricks tall, or 2457 mm (in completed condition) Observant readers will note that 2,048 meters do not correspond to the 91 meters of the excavated foundations if one assumes a scale 1:25. Then the model should be 3.64 meters. And proportionally also a lot higher. To achieve that, I would have to bring the number of revolutions to 14. Which automatically means that the highest point of the first tour is already 108 bricklayers high, a lot higher than the 60 bricklayers of the current design. That would be difficult from an execution point of view because you would have to work with scaffolding by then. The weight would increase enormously. But above all, it would become an insurmountable financial problem. And the proportions of the Tower would also be out of balance. So the current design is based on a slightly smaller tower, a compromise between its correct size and financial feasibility. The full-size dimensions would now be 51 meters. In those ancient times, quite a construction ...
  5. Pinnacle

    Buildings, scale 1:25, created by Pinnacle

    That is correct. I like this painting the most because it looks realistic. And it will be square because of the excavated foundations.
  6. I think that in general, Lego-drawing-programmes not are designed for really huge MOC's. Although It is possible to make drawings of large buildings (600,000+) parts, it is not possible anymore to make a partslist or building instructions. I don't know of the problem lays in the drawing programme or in too little capacity of the computer itself... Cutaway drawing of the tower of Babel Created with LDCad. Colours are not the same of the MOC itself but used to distinguish the sub-models.
  7. Pinnacle

    Buildings, scale 1:25, created by Pinnacle

    Tower of Babel III During excavations at the site of ancient Babylon, the German archaeologist Robert Johann Koldewey found the foundation of the Tower which was 91 x 91 meters. That means a square Tower.. It is suspected that the famous Tower once stood there. But no one knows how the Tower was built and what the architecture was. Moreover, the building has had a turbulent period in which it has been created, destroyed, rebuilt, then demolished and yet rebuilt. Until 390 BC Alexander the Great wanted to reconstruct the Tower, but during a working visit he got an accident. That was seen as a curse at the time. Construction was halted, and the Tower fell into oblivion. Gradually the remains disappeared, probably used in other structures. But much of the story is shrouded in mist, and several authors have often put a different spin on it. Besides, many artists in various periods have depicted the Tower of Babel in different ways, each in their own way and at their own insight. Considering all this, I think that I could make my own creation. And so I opted for the excavated square floor plan of 91 x 91 meters because of the authenticity and the possibility to create this building in LEGO parts. And for the spiral staircase or walkway, I choose the Gothic style of Pieter Bruegel the Elder.
  8. Pinnacle

    Buildings, scale 1:25, created by Pinnacle

    The Tower of Babel II Round or square. painting depicts a round tower. So it would be obvious to build a round tower. There are several ways to make more or less round shapes with LEGO-bricks. And sometimes the result can look outstanding. But I like it to build as accurate as possible, not only architecturally but also qua construction. You should be able to recreate it with real bricks on a 1:1 scale, and then you will have the real thing. Of course, this will not always work, but it has to get as close as possible. Moreover, the Tower is not exactly round, but it is a spiral, or rather, a conical helix. And that's a form that's hard to build with LEGO parts. At least on a larger scale. Because I think a 'natural' construction is more important than a round shape, I have chosen to build the Tower rectangular. Other considerations. The Tower of Babel is mainly a mythical building. In the Bible, it is used primarily to explain the origin of the different languages in the world. But very little is written about the shape and construction of the Tower. Also nothing about the dimensions, except that it had to reach "to the heavens". The more profane story tells that sometime in 2300 B.C. a man named Nimrod ordered the construction of the Tower of Babel. Nimrod was Noah's great-grandson, indeed, the man of the ark. The location would be somewhere on the Euphrates. Nimrod's descendants probably didn't want to experience any more flooding and wanted to keep their feet dry. And that's why they would like to build a tower as tall as possible. Probably the city of Babylon originated there on the Euphrates. In the period between 1770 BC and 1670 BC, Babylon was one of the largest cities with an estimated population of 200,000 people. So a tall tower in such a city is not at all so unlikely. And it is also assumed that the Tower was completed in those days. One thing is sure: as Bruegel depicts the Tower of Babel on his painting, it has surely not looked like it in real life. Much more likely it was a so-called ziggurat, a stepped pyramid with a temple on top, as was customary at the time. And a ziggurat at that time was always square or rectangular with multiple layers and equipped with stairs.
  9. Pinnacle

    Buildings, scale 1:25, created by Pinnacle

    It will be a single building. The sections will be too many or too heavy to transport. This is a typical home-project that not easily can be transported.
  10. Pinnacle

    Buildings, scale 1:25, created by Pinnacle

    Introduction. And now the project I'm working on right now, Tower of Babel. After the necessary research and drawing, I laid the first brick on September 1, 2011. Since then, I have been steadily working on this structure with almost biblical dimensions. Of course, I don't work on it every day. That varies according to the seasons. In the summer I prefer to work on the house and garden. In winter, it is often too cold in the old barn. But fortunately, it is not a work with a deadline, but a hobby for fun and pleasure. Why the Tower of Babel? After building several houses and castles, I was looking for a new challenge. I had plenty of ideas. Initially, it was going to be a kind of fairy tale castle. A mix of Schloss Neuschwanstein and a Disneyland castle. But on closer inspection, much of my stock of white stones turned out to be too yellowed to build a genuinely sparkling fairytale castle. Moreover, the parts with the standard fairy colours are difficult to obtain or do not exist in the desired form. A tower from the movie "Lords of the ring" also came into mind. But that's been done by many LEGO fans and is not very original anymore. But then, I saw an image of the famous painting of "The Little Tower of Babel," painted by Pieter Bruegel the Elder in 1563. That's exactly what I wanted. The challenge was mainly in the circular stairway or gallery around the Tower. This is not a 'layer upon layer' building like, for example, an apartment building. But because of that ascending staircase, there is no layer alike.
  11. Pinnacle

    Keeping track of parts or buying new ones?

    Well, it's always worth considering.
  12. Pinnacle

    Buildings, scale 1:25, created by Pinnacle

    I did't see your post until now, so I did some explanation in your topic. Thanks for your nice compliments.
  13. Pinnacle

    Keeping track of parts or buying new ones?

    My MOC’s are usually slightly larger than the average sets. I build them in an old barn and there they stand on a table. These MOC’s are often scale models of historic buildings such as castles, mansions and the like. Construction time on average one year. Usually, they have a lifespan of ten years and will be exhibited at various events. Because these buildings also have an interior, complete with stairs, hallways, doors, chimney channels and so on, there is plenty of space and opportunity for spiders to crawl in there and make a web. Unfortunately, flies and other food do not come in, so they die prematurely of starvation. I live in an old farmhouse and I’m amazed that these spiders make cobwebs in the craziest places... And then die... Please don't ask me why they do that...
  14. Pinnacle

    Keeping track of parts or buying new ones?

    “Killing your darlings” will always hurt a little in the beginning. But as I see how much dust, cobwebs and dead spiders ended up in a MOC, Then I am only happy to clean up all the parts and used them in a new MOC. I make photos and drawings of the more complicated creations so I can always reconstruct them. But I have never done that in reality. I’m more interested in a new challenge. But I need the old parts of course…