ALCO

Eurobricks Citizen
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    289
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About ALCO

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  • What is favorite LEGO theme? (we need this info to prevent spam)
    Trains
  • Which LEGO set did you recently purchase or build?
    Crocodile

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    https://www.bricktraindepot.com/

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    Where ever my pants are...
  • Interests
    Trains, Realistic train MOC's, railroad landscapes

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  • Country
    United States

Recent Profile Visitors

1610 profile views
  1. ALCO

    [MOC] Turntable

    Nice! Looking forward to the 3rd installment!
  2. ALCO

    Some dumb PU questions

    First generation PTC for Lego trains.
  3. ALCO

    Fitting a Lego Crossover

    If you are trying to make a crossover with r40 switches and keep the 8 stud separation then you will have to use the hacksaw. It's more intimidating than it really is. I've cut up quite a few switches and I'm so much happier for it. Also, crossovers are the easiest modifications to do because they only require some cutting. Stubby switches and moving the throw bar to the through side of they track are a little more involved as they require some gluing and joining rails.
  4. ALCO

    Custom Lego Train Axle Holders

    Nice work there! A good portion of the serious train builders here in North America use MR55ZZ ball-bearings pressed into 1x2 technic bricks with 2 holes for brick-built trucks/bogies. The bearings drastically reduce rolling resistance especially for heavier cars that are built to 1:48 scale (generally 8w). There are a couple suppliers for these parts, they can be found on www.bricktraindepot.com or www.brickmodelrailroader.com. I'm not sure they ship to Australia though. The bearings are pretty easy to find on AliExpress and the axles and wheels 3rd party manufacture can be found on www.bricktracks.com. I have built some of these myself and it takes some work. But I also bought 200 wheels from Lego when the new wheels and folders came out on the Hidden Side train.
  5. ALCO

    [MOC] Westbahn Stadler Kiss 2

    Really impressive!! I'm loving the brick-built color lines!
  6. ALCO

    Train Wheel Size Naming

    I like it. And I think @zephyr1934 has an excellent point being the most prominent rod supplier.
  7. If you have the environment where you can run the train endlessly then yes, 9v has some advantages. In my environment I have two Toddler fans of Lego or Toddler fans of daddy's trains. So for me it's best to pick them up when I'm done or when play begins to get more vigorous.
  8. ALCO

    LEGO Trains 2021

    This is interesting! I think train fans are M more likely to look to other brands to get the parts/models they wants. I'm more into the model railroading aspect of the hobby so BrickTracks, @zephyr1934's rods, ball-bearings, neodymium magnets etc, are all ok with me. That Tibetan train looks really good! Looking forward to reading more about it.
  9. ALCO

    LEGO Trains 2021

    It was great to have the crocodile because of the driver wheels!
  10. Oooh! I love the Empire Builder going around the Christmas tree!
  11. @Toastie great write up and excellent read! Really cool! Thank you for clarifying and showing that your setup is pretty easy to achieve. My point above was that one cannot go out and just buy all the parts already properly configured right off the shelf. They still have to create the bridge rectifier ribbon. I think that should be part of the power system which fix needs.
  12. Even with power pickups, one has to have a full loop of 9v track to make that work. Any plastic track (switches) in there...there are solutions to have a battery carry the train through those areas but those electronics get really complicated really fast and there are solutions no solutions that are off-the-shelf.
  13. Thank you @zephyr1934! The rods look great!
  14. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! All the flex hose is quite laborious but the final outcome is quite woth it. Good eye! That is indeed an ingot on top of the light. Quite by accident but now my goto moving forward. I got on in my BrickLink order by mistake so I thought I'd try it on the light and I quite agree. It looks better than the 1x2 tile. Thank you!
  15. I saw a few posts about folks wanting to see some more photos of the winners of the 2020 Brick Train Awards. I would like to present the regional winner of the Best Steam Locomotive category of the 2020 Brick Train Awards. Presenting the Chicago Burlington & Quincy 2-8-2 Mikado! A bit about why I choose to model this engine. I live long the "Racetrack" a stretch of triple-track mainline between Chicago and Aurora Illinois and wanted to model something steam closer to home to the Chicago Burlington & Quincy Railroad was the natural choice. I have a Big Boy, Emerald Night, Disney Train so I have smaller and very big engines covered. I need to fill the mid-size freight engine gap. While doing some research I found a CB&Q 2-8-2 Mikado that survived scrapping and that was actually in service! It was engine number 4960. A bit about the prototype. Engine # 4960 was among the last batch of Mikados purchased by the CB&Q. It was built in August of 1923 and part of the class O1-A. These were well balanced, easily fired, and well liked by their crews. They were replaced with diesels during the Transition era. 4960 was retired from freight service in 1957 and selected for the Burlington's Steam program which ran until 1966. During this time she pulled excursion trains around the Chicago area as the Burlington was headquartered in Aurora at the time. When the program was cancelled 4960 was sold to the Mid-Continental Railway Museum in North Freedom Wisconsin where she sat for a while. Fast Forward to 1981. The Bristol and Western Tourist Railroad was getting started and leased 4960 and restored her. 4960's time with the Bristol and Western was cut short due to bankruptcy. The engineer and fireman that ran 4960 went on to work for the Grand Canyon Railway but kept thinking about 4960. They convinced the GCRR to purchase 4960 where it she was restored and received a face-lift as well. 4960 was converted to burn waste cooking oil and periodically pulls tourist trains from Williams Arizona to the Grand Canyon. A bit about the build. This was a fun and challenging build requiring a lot of new techniques to accomplish the look and different aspects. I wanted to make this a functional engine that I could play with, but also a detailed engine that I could proudly display in my living room. This is a PowerFunctions engine and has 2 L motors in the boiler along with the receiver. The battery, naturally, is in the tender. I almost did not include the brick-built canvas curtains in back of the cab but @Roadmonkeytj really encouraged me to keep them, and I'm so glad he did. I really was not planning to submit this to the 2020 Brick Train Awards because i was waiting for decals and a couple parts to finish it so I submitted it as a digital build with a work-in-progress photo and a test run video. I was quite surprised to see that I won! See the announcement here at Brick Model Railroader. Now the fun bit, the photos! Render of the BTA Entry Questions, comments are welcome! Thanks for visiting! ALCO