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Found 2 results

  1. The EMD F7 was the SD40-2 of its day, the first true "common" diesel locomotive; thousands were built and could be found powering almost any train. When production had ended some 2,366 F7As and 1,483 F7Bs had been produced by 1953 just four years after the locomotive was first cataloged. According to an article by Don Strack, published in the November/December 1991 issue of "Diesel Era: Volume 2, Number 6" the, "base price on two cab units was $161,000 and the base price for two booster units was $147,500." This was also the first instance of the Electro-Motive Division's new General Motors Diesel (GMD) subsidiary filling orders. Read more from this article about this historic loco on this site. My model was inspired by the Union Pacific 1471 and 1476B pictured below. It was really the only photo I could find of a UP F7 A/B pair. My initial inspiration came after recently obtaining sets 10020, the Santa Fe Super Chief, and 10022, one each of the dining, sleeping and observation cars. I can see why they are so coveted, each is beautiful!I set about to modify 10020 in several ways to make it look better. I decided on the UP scheme because my dad left me his LGB scale UP loco when he passed (just like his LGB BNSF that inspired this build, here). I modified the sides and doors to more closely resemble the F7a and F7b units (which I'm presuming the 10020 was based on). While the windows are not round (yet) the vents between them, the doors, the grab rails, plus the square sand fill doors are all details I tried to capture more accurately than set 10020 did. Plus the battery box and fuel tank underneath look better. I decided to add twin train motors to the a-unit to propel it because my trains are heavy, my curves are tight and one motor just doesn't have the traction necessary (power yes, traction no). The PF receiver blends in nicely on the rear and the middle fan on top acts as a power switch. Seven of my eight locos have a concealed power "button" accessible from the outside, the Super Chief being my only one I have to remove the top on. Speaking of consistency between locos, my BNSF and CSX have a distinct side window look with the two vertical tiles. I'm considering that same look for my UP. The taped up windows look okay, especially from a few feet away, and while I like the slightly more detailed or scale appearance, the tape looks unfinished and I'm not sure it is necessary. I also applied minimal detailing on the inside. The b-unit got an engine you can see thru the windows and the a unit got a hint of an engine hidden in amongst the wires. The lettering and numbering I did myself on my inkjet printer using Testors decal paper. They are applied wet then they dry nice and smooth. As usual I'll share my LDD file for anyone who wants to examine, build or modify my design. I'll upload that soon. Here you go. https://bricksafe.com/pages/sed6 Hope you like! Edit: just realized I didn't print the X1471 decals that go by the headlights for the nose! Also in the pic above the stickers peeling off are actually just static cling stickers, they work well enough but show some bubbles and don't handle tight radius curves like on the nose. The final water-slide decals are applied in all the above pictures, except this one.
  2. These locomotives are inspired by set 60052 (Cargo Train) in some respect or another. The F-10 passenger model takes cues from two sets, one being the classic 10200 (AT&SF Super Chief) with regards to the nose design, while 60052 (Cargo Train) takes over the design for the colors scheme. The freight locomotive is more a heavy duty 60052, with parts of set 10219 (Maersk Train) thrown in to make if beefier and more prototypical to the SD-40, which is a six axle version of the GP-40 it it was created to be. F-10 passenger locomotive This model takes cues from two sets, one being the classic 10200 (AT&SF Super Chief) with regards to the nose design, while 60052 (Cargo Train) takes over the design for the colors scheme. Since the last time I uploaded this model, I have redone the roof to make the engine the same height as my other diesels, and have redone the nose and cab windows. (again). The letters LCGR go on the bottom row of studs, while the numbers 3247 go on the top four. The rear of the engine units. Loco statistics: Engine Number: 3247 Engine Type: Diesel-electric Configuration: B-B Engine Class: F10-A (cab) F10-B (booster) Designer: Electro-Motive Division (EMD) Build Date: 1961 Builder: EMD Current Owner: Lodi Clearwater & Green River Rail-Road Top Speed: 70 MPH This is the cab unit, where the engineer sits to control the train. This model no longer has an interior. Fictional background: These locos are from a experimental locomotive series called the F-10, which was built in 1961-2 on an order of 20 locomotives in sets of two (3240 - 3260) for the relatively small Lodi Clearwater & Green River Rail-Road (also known as the LCGR) by General Motors' Electro-Motive Division. These consisted of 10 A (cab) units and 10 B (booster) units, and were originally painted blue with black bases / roof lines. The principal use of the locomotives was the commuter trains radiating out from the city of Green River, Louisiana. The highest honor for these locomotives (and their engineers), though, was taking the Midnight Special from Lodi, Mississippi to Houston, Texas. The locomotives remained in service while the railroad bled money and deferred maintenance due to financial missteps and bad management to the point where a small derailment and fire led to the subsequent burning of the entire Susie Q. Bayou bridge in 1987. After that, most of the battered and weary F-10's were sold to museums or scrap, although five of the best preserved ones were upgraded mechanically and electrically in 1997. These final five serve the financially stabilized and better maintained LCGR to this day. This is the booster unit, which provides extra pulling power to the train. It does not have a cab as it receives orders from the cab engine via multiple unit control cables hooked between the two locomotives. SD-40 freight locomotive Inspired by and mostly taken from instructions by Zephyr1934 for converting the 2014 set 60052 into a model like set 10219 (Maersk Train). The wheels, however, are modified from Anthony Sava's Alco MRS-1 diesel loco, turning this GP-40 styled loco into a simplified version of the Electro Motive Division type SD-40 diesel electric locomotive. The rear of the loco features twin marker lights. As on the passenger loco, their is space for four numbers of the loco and four letters (yes, I need to update the pictures!) for the railroad near the nose of the engine. Fictional background: In August 1966, Electro Motive Division (also called EMD ) delivered a group of thirty SD-40 locomotives to the Lodi Clearwater & Green River Rail-Road. (otherwise known as the LCGR) These locomotives numbered 3260 to 3290 were immediately put to use in the Railroad's workshops, and moving cargo from any of number of smaller on-line businesses and facilities such as the relatively large Cosmo's Bicycle Factory near Green River, Louisiana. The SD-40's were seldom repainted in cash-strapped LCGR service, and quickly earned the name "Bruisers" for their battered appearance and worn black-and-blue color scheme, although the engines were repainted and upgraded in 2002. (though the name “Bruisers” seems to have stuck!) I made this logo by using the Rock Island logo and the font "Union Gray" to make the words. The name of the railroad is a salute to the band Creedence Clearwater Revival. The name of one of this band's songs is "Lodi" while another is "Green River". (as seen my the logo) I also used bits from some of their other songs in the history of the railroad and it's trains, such as the "Midnight Special" passenger train and the "Susie Q." Bayou bridge. I've yet to write the whole history of the road, but that shouldn't be too hard to do. This is all I've worked out so far, and Comments, Questions, and Complaints are always welcome.