CrispyBassist

Eurobricks Citizen
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About CrispyBassist

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/91993389@N08/

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Champaign, IL
  • Interests
    Trains, city, town

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  1. Just an idea for switches

    Woah, these are neat. Any plans for producing them in the flesh (or plastic, as it were)? They would certainly bring a lot of options for layouts.
  2. LNER Class A4 4468 - MALLARD

    The door and ring are because the tender is a corridor tender, with a small hallway so that on long trips the relief crew to get from the cab of the locomotive to the train. The ring is a window to illuminate the passage. See this article for more info.
  3. Those even look a lot like MU couplers, which often have power transfer built in. I might have to try this too...
  4. For those that build with a digital program that might work. Not all of us do though, and tracking down all the parts strewn across the floor gets old quick. So does spending hours rebuilding the thing every day. Just because it's "supposed to be a kids toy" doesn't mean everyone sees it that way or wants their best builds smashed repeatedly. I've not had issues with this, and mine are all long, heavy 8-wide. I keep a layer of bubble wrap under them and on the sides, which actually might help support it by the low parts between the trucks.
  5. Lego Railway Signaling

    This is actually the opposite of how the real railroads would do it: flashing aspects always (in the US at least) are less restrictive than solid ones. This is so that if the flashing mechanism fails, the signal doesn't erroneously show a more permissive aspect. In other words, the flashing green would mean the next signal is clear and the solid green would mean the next signal is red. Granted, you're not trying to replicate the real railroads, but I thought I'd comment on the fail-safe nature of the system.
  6. Kiko´s Train World

    This may be true, but I use them exclusively on my rolling stock and have never had an issue. I've even ran them on very uneven tables at high speed without issue.
  7. Lego Ambulance Plane MOD

    I've had issues with this in the past too. On Flickr I go to the pic I want to add, click the download button (bottom right corner), click "view all sizes", pick the size I want (based on Eurobricks guidelines), right click the picture and select "Copy image address" (may be something different, but similar for browsers other than Chrome), then when I drop the link in the box here it automatically becomes an image. Hope this helps.
  8. London Underground 'tube' MOC. (1996 stock)

    The London Underground has two power rails as well, one on the side of the track and one between the running rails, so a line of tiles down the middle of the track for the road wheel to run on would actually be prototypically correct for the system. This line of tiles could be built up to the height of the rail and possibly make a smooth transition over switches.
  9. This is a great idea, particularly because it saves us from having to cut apart standard Lego turnouts to get these geometries! Just to confirm, will these geometries will allow for proper switch ladders with tracks at standard spacing?
  10. [MOC] Bubba died in Vietnam war

    Nice water effect with those tiles not fully pressed down! I'm gonna save that idea for future use...
  11. My Rise from the Dark Ages

    Looking good! That thing looks like it's flying even faster than my trains do!
  12. Union Pacific Big Boy # 4014

    Wow, this looks great! The extra 9 studs really make a difference. Looks much closer to scale now. I'd love to see it running!
  13. [MoC] TP56 Industrial Switcher Locomotive

    I've had similar issues with the wheels of my 6-axle heavyweight coach catching on 9v switches, and I realized it was because the PF ones have a small indent on the straight rail that the tip of the switch can fit into. The 9v ones don't have this because of the metal part, and so there's a small bump where a wheel flange can catch. The long wheelbase of this lil guy (11 studs, by my count) means the wheel flanges are coming in at a tight angle in that configuration, probably just enough to catch the switch. I changed the trucks such that one of the end axles slid, rather than the middle. That took care of it completely! Nice job cramming all the PF components into such a small package! And the light grey truck really does make the details pop.
  14. BrickTracks: Double Crossover

    LOL! Sounds about right - I'm sitting trackside in Nebraska as I write this... The video looked great. You'll have to bring it next time I'm at a show with my big motors and passenger cars!
  15. Train - Extended Track System

    These seem to be a remake of the Lego switches but without the reverse curve. The Lego switches are the switch plus the dark grey piece shown in the first of the three configurations. In order to do either of the second two arrangements, the switch needs to be cut.