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Found 71 results

  1. Hi! My name is Rodrigo and I live in Buenos Aires, Argentina. I grew up watching the Back to the Future trilogy, and I believe it’s just a perfect set of films. The moment I heard there was going to be a LEGO set with the DeLorean featuring Marty and Doc, it was like a dream come true. It was a must buy, no questions asked. The minifigures were absolutely fantastic, even though the Cuusoo time machine wasn’t my favorite build. No windscreen? Why?? Nevermind. LEGO and BTTF together, can’t complain. A couple of years later, we got a couple of LEGO Dimensions sets. This time, very little to build, a new hair piece for Doc Brown (much more accurate btw), and a brand new hoverboard for Marty, which is fantastic. The thing is Marty and Doc had the same torso and legs design from the Cuusoo set . Couldn’t they try another designs? Never mind. Good to know LEGO still considers BTTF within their licenses and products. That’s great. A few weeks, LEGO announced that Marty and Doc will be in the new series of Brickheadz. Fantastic! Brand new line, seems to be doing great, good for Marty and Doc. The problem? Like Cuusoo and Dimensions, Marty is wearing the same shirt, the red vest, the clear jeans… And Doc with his all white nuclear radiaton suit. This is the moment when two of my biggest passions clash. Is it possible for LEGO to consider even making different minifig designs for Marty and Doc? I understand they won’t choose other characters, but Marty and Doc are constantly changing outfits during the trilogy… Is it too hard to design a Western Marty? Or a 1955 Doc Brown? Why does Ghostbusters get the Firehouse and BTTF can’t get the Clock Tower? Once the BTTF Hardcore fan shuts up, the LEGO AFOL comes around and says that this may be truth, but LEGO may not be that interested in investing time and resources in a franchise that doesn’t pay off as much as others. That maybe, I should be grateful that LEGO is still making BTTF sets. Sorry for the length, but I really wanted to share this slight disappointment regarding the way LEGO worked the BTTF license. It’s kind of a weird feeling, but I can’t help thinking how much good LEGO can do with so little, an do justice to a fantastic franchise such as Back to the Future.
  2. Dear all I am new to Eurobricks but felt it would be a worthwhile experience to join up and share something with you. In essence, I am looking for some help and or advice. I have been a serious collector of LEGO for around 7 years and have manged to build up, in my most humble of opinions, a rather large collection. All of my items items are either Marvel, DC or Cuusoo/ Ideas with a very small amount of loose Star Wars minifigures, promotional LEGO giveaways etc. Every single set, polybag, book, DVD, comic etc has been purchased, bubble wrapped, boxed and stored safely. 99% of the collection is mint and sealed with a few exceptions which are near mint but still sealed. Not one item has been opened. It has been an obsession of mine for a while and the collection has been built up and cared for extremely well. However, space is now becoming a bit of an issue so I posed the question to myself, "What on earth am I going to do with all this LEGO?" In summary, I have 310 lots made up from sets, keyrings, books, dvds, polybags and specials. I have multiples of some sets. I have every single Cuusoo/ Ideas set every made, 116 DC Comics lots, 123 Marvel Comics lots and 35 Marvel/ DC keyrings. With Comic Con and USA exclusives aside, I have every single DC and Marvel set, polybag, magnet, book and keyring released since 2011. I honestly do not know what to do. Do I keep going knowing that Marvel and DC sets will continue to be released probably after I have gone, do I bite the bullet and sell them all or do I just stop buying and sit on them all for a few years? Any help or advice would be hugely appreciated. I have a detailed spreadsheet of the entire collection. If anyone would like to see it, please just ask. With thanks in advance
  3. SmallTownBrickBoy

    Hi My Name is... SmallTownBrickBoy

    Hi EB, My name is SmallTownBrickBoy and recently became Lego enthusiast again, after suppressing it for almost 25 years. It all started around Christmas, when I was out buying presents for my nephew who is six years old. He wished for some Ninjago and I really wanted to give it to him. During the Christmas-shopping I was talking with my girlfriend about how cool it would be if Lego made the Curiosity Rover at one point. And then we bought the Ninjago and that was all. The thought about the Rover would get out of my head - so I visited lego.com and lord-and-behold, CUUSOO #005 was just about to be made and was available for pre-order on the website. A few clicks - and I ordered it. I got the package yesterday - and I just assembled it this morning. I also bought 2 x 10664 LEGO® Creative Tower 1 x 70709 Galactic Titan V29 (it was on sale) I guess I'm hooked again :)
  4. The Enforcer is back and better than ever before! Support on CUUSOO! Introduction The Enforcer is a fully motorised remote control Technic off road vehicle. The vehicle has a police theme and is loosely based on the Hummer H2 but many subtle changes have been made to obey copyright restrictions. Here are some examples of the inspiration for my design: The Enforcer was originally an entry for the ‘You Design It, We Make It’ competition but ended up coming in second place to rm88’s ‘Boss’ crawler. However I do not think that it is the end of the road for the Enforcer. The Enforcer Recharged is a massive overhaul of the original Enforcer. Firstly, as this is CUUSOO, the original 9398 chassis could not be used anymore, so the chassis has undergone a massive redesign to adapt it specially to the Enforcer’s needs. The winch has now been motorised and all lights are now power functions. The battery box has now been changed to a 8878 rechargeable battery box which reduces weight massively (by about 160g) and is more convenient. There is now no need to remove the battery box so this allowed major part optimisations to be made. The result is this, The Enforcer Recharged: Note: LDD does not contain certain power functions elements so in some images the following elements will be represented as shown: Chassis The Enforcer now uses a redesigned chassis and not the 9398 chassis.: The new chassis does not have 4 wheel steering like the 9398 as I did not think that it was needed on a model of this theme. The 88004 servo motor for steering is now located in the front suspension module. The chassis is powered by one central 8882 extra large motor transmitting power to all wheels through the power joint system, unlike the 9398 which had one 88003 large motor for drive above each axle. Below is a diagram of the drive-train and gearing: I have now changed the design of the drivetrain to prevent breakages of the gears in and driving the centre differential. The older style non-bevelled differential is now used and the gearing converts the torque from the XL motor to RPM before reaching the centre differential. Further gear reduction has been added after the two axle differentials to maintain an overall gear ratio of 1 : 6.72. The gearing results in 0.44 times the original torque on the centre differential. That's 40.2 mNm with an RPM of 495. I am just finishing the casing for the new rear axle module. I am also thinking of working on an alternate setup which is the 9398 chassis with the battery box changed for the rechargeable version so that the bodywork can still be directly attached. Here are some comparisons between the 9398 crawler chassis and the Enforcer chassis to show how the gear ratios were decided. These stats have yet to be updated for the new drivetrain: Because the extra large motor does not deliver quite as much total power as the two large motors, two gear configurations are available for speed focused or torque focused performance. This is shown in the drivetrain diagram above the table. Although the 8878 rechargeable battery box only outputs 7.2V which is less than the 9V from the 8881 AA battery box, this voltage is more consistent because the voltage from a Lithium polymer battery remains constant until the charge is depleted, whereas the voltage from AA batteries drops significantly throughout use. Note that unlike the 9398 chassis, the front and rear differentials need to be facing in opposite directions as shown, otherwise the wheels will not rotate in the same direction: On the Enforcer chassis, the space above the rear axle in the rear suspension module is occupied by an 8878 rechargeable battery box which is much lighter and more convenient than the regular 8881 battery box. More importantly, this means that the battery box does not need to be removed to change the batteries, it can just be plugged into the charger without being removed. This allowed the bodywork to be built directly on to the chassis, saving parts. Another main feature of the chassis is the dual shock absorbers above each wheel. This is to help prevent the easy rolling behaviour which is common in Technic off-road vehicles with a heavier bodywork and to scale the suspension stiffness more appropriately to the weight of the model. Softer suspension such as using only one shock absorber per wheel results in the bodywork leaning away from the chassis on lateral inclines, causing premature tipping so the new design helps prevent this: Care had to be taken to allow each shock absorber joint to rotate on two axes to allow the front and rear axles to move freely with the suspension. The main image shows the shock absorbers functioning. Different Forms The model with the most features has a very high part count so I have decided to make multiple versions of the model simplified to various degrees for different and slightly more practical part counts. The features of each version are shown below: Features on all models All models feature 4 opening doors, an opening tailgate and an opening bonnet. The doors feature compound hinges to allow the doors to fit into their frames properly. Each door also has a rotary handle to secure the door shut with: The tailgate has a sliding handle which locks it in place when closed: All models also feature power functions headlights and taillights which can be switched on or off while driving: All models except the Enforcer Rapid Response have a rear roof section which can be removed for an alternate form. Charging can be done easily by opening the rear door: The Enforcer Elite The Enforcer Elite features power functions flashing police lights. The flashing is performed by a mechanism containing a medium motor and 2 control switches: The same motor is also linked to a piston engine in the bonnet: The gear ratios mean that the piston engine will run at 127rpm and the light flashing system will be driven at 26.4rpm which will result in the police lights performing one on/off cycle every 1.14 seconds. The Enforcer Elite contains a front mounted winch powered by a medium motor which is shown on the left in the above diagram. The gear ratio for this winch is the same as the gear ratio for the winch on the Unimog U400 (1 : 24 gear ratio, 15.8rpm winch speed, 40mNm torque). The winch would also contains a clutch gear to avoid damage in the event of a string jam or when the winch is fully reeled in. This is replaced by one of the white 24 teeth gears in the render as LDD does not contain the clutch gear. The Enforcer Elite will be controlled with 2 8885 IR controllers. The power functions wiring layout needed to make the functions run correctly is shown below along with the physical locations of the PF elements: The Enforcer Standard Issue The Enforcer Standard Issue shares largely the same bodywork as the Elite version but does not contain the winch, flashing police lights or piston engine to reduce the part count and number of power functions elements required. The bonnet has been modified to accommodate the removal of the piston engine. The power functions lights are now turned on and off by a control switch in the boot which can be accessed by removing the rear roof section. The switch can be secured on with the red push bolt. The power functions wiring and layout for this model are shown below: The Enforcer Rapid Response The Enforcer Rapid Response shares the same functions as the Enforcer Standard Issue but has the entire roof removed for a whole new look and a lighter and faster feel along with a further reduced part count. Possible Stickers The Enforcer has potential for a great sticker set to emphasize the police theme. Below is an example of a possible sticker set: SUPPORT NOW ON CUUSOO!!! Thank you for taking your time to read this, all support is greatly appreciated!
  5. SamGras

    1966 Lego Batmobile

    MOC Presentation I am huge Batman fan and have passed that love to my 4 year old daughter. I have been building LEGO sets with her for some time now her favorite sets are TMNT, Friends & Batman. She was upset that the store bought Batmobiles did not allow Robin to sit in the Batmobile along side Batman. Therefore i made her the most iconic Batmobile, the 1966 version. This era Batman is fun and campy perfect for a four year old. I collected pieces for my build over a month. I dug through my childhood collection, picked bricks from "Classic Plastic Bricks in Ellicott City, pulled some pieces off my other Batmobiles and ordered parts off brick link to complete the build. The construction took about a week with many revisions specifically to the length of the vehicle. It was all guess and check I did not have any plans other than what was in my head Please support my 1966 Adam West LEGO Batmobile on the 'LEGOIdeas' Website. We have nearly 5,000 votes but need your help to reach our goal of 10K. Thank you for your consideration! Sam https://ideas.lego.com/projects/61339
  6. Hi, If you have blue & red 3D glasses, have a look to this fabulous model. This is a cuusoo model of Cornwaille. If you like, support it! His Tie Bomber is also great... If some are interested, I could write a note concerning the stereo renders.
  7. Hello all, Here's my latest addition to the Wasabi District... Barnes & Noble / Starbucks Store! EDIT - I UPLOADED IT ON LEGO CUUSOO - LINK HERE - PLEASE CHECK IT OUT!!! Its size alone makes it a longshot, but what the heck, right? Here's some sample pics... NOTES: -My 3rd largest MOC -Easiest of my big 3 to build, because there aren't much rooms compared to the apartments I've made -Experimented with waterslide decals, IMO I had mixed success. I would like to try it again, though. Only used decals on important pieces; decaling every single "book" is lunacy! -I hope to create a city block with nothing but brand names, with this being its signature store. Here's the rest of the images! Plenty more inside so please take a look. Comments and Suggestions is appreciated. Thanks for looking all!
  8. Can anyone actually confirm if LEGO destroys their old, unused molds or not? It's been allegedly stated that like, BIONICLE's old molds no longer exist but it'd be pretty stupid for LEGO to just destroy molds when they don't know what they'll need in the future, as well as be against the entire concept of LEGO to just permanently discontinue parts. I also remember when talking of the Ideas space suit thing being redesigned, they may have mentioned molds LEGO didn't have or use anymore.
  9. Hi there, it's Ryan Smith from Adelaide in Australia. I'm back from hiatus to bring you something new-n-tasty! A box of delicious looking (non-edible) chocolates to tempt either a hungry chocolate fanatic or ideally, this makes a great gift for Mother's Day, Father's Day, Get Well, Christmas, etc. There are 36 kinds in total that consist of milk chocolate, white, dark and a combination of milk/white. Some appear to have cream fillings in them but don't let them fool you! This one is generally for display purposes or if you desire, you can switch out the brick-built chocs for Real Edible Ones! LEGO Boxed Chocolates by Ryan Smith, on Flickr LEGO Boxed Chocolates by Ryan Smith, on Flickr LEGO Boxed Chocolates by Ryan Smith, on Flickr LEGO Boxed Chocolates by Ryan Smith, on Flickr LEGO Boxed Chocolates by Ryan Smith, on Flickr LEGO Boxed Chocolates by Ryan Smith, on Flickr LEGO Boxed Chocolates by Ryan Smith, on Flickr Please support this one on Ideas! -> https://ideas.lego.com/projects/132257
  10. ...and I'm a very fan of LEGO since I was a little child! Now I'm 35 and I've rediscovered the pleasure of this game thanks to Internet and the Digital Designer. I have uploaded a couple of projects on the Ideas site; one of them became a "staff pick" few days ago and is acquiring a great number of supporters. It's THE PARTHENON. If you like it you can support it too here: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/102120 Cheers! Marco
  11. glenbricker

    Wayne Manor Modular

    DarthKy and I have been working on a modular based on the Wayne Manor and using the Modular footprint in order to restrict the design to a reasonable scale. We have also tried to fill it with various references from the comics, movies, animations, and the 60's TV show. To make the design more fun we have have built it up on four quarter baseplates allowing the design to be opened up. Batman References I hope the true Batfans out there will appreciate the various references we have integrated. I have here two images of references followed by their descriptions so if you are of the mind to try to figure these things out on your own, go ahead. I admit, some of them are a bit esoteric. Image one references A. Grandfather Clock A Grandfather Clock is in almost every incarnation of Wayne Manor. In most continuities it is the access to the Batcave as well. In this case, we are not able to use it as the access as a figure is quite broad. Note that the Clock is set to 10:48. Setting the clock to this time unlocks the entrance and is the time of day the fateful mugging occured. B. Man of the Year Award In the Lego Batman 2 Game, Bruce Wayne beats out Lex Luthor for the Man of the Year Award. C. Painting of Bruce Wayne on a horse with a dog at his side This is a double reference both to The Dark Knight Returns and Ace the Bat-hound. Bruce Wayne is rarely seen with horses, but he does have horses in The Dark Knight Returns which grants Batman a significant advantage at a critical point in the story. So this is a just a subtle reference to one of Batman's epic tales. Ace the Bat-hound is, as the name implies, is a dog who aids Batman. He originated in the 1950s but did not transition the Crisis. He has re-appeared in Batman Beyond, Krypto the Super Dog, and Batman: Brave and the Bold. D. Armor and Sword Display We have based this build off of a display in the 1989 Batman movie by Tim Burton. Hopefully the picture speaks for itself. E. The "Waynes" Of course everyone has their favorite Robin. We have tried to include an acceptable presentation of each in this wall portrait. The line up from Left to Right: Dick Grayson, Damian Wayne, Bruce Wayne, Tim Drake, and Alfred Pennyworth. It does not play though 100% but I tried to make the ties and kerchiefs color compatible with the super hero personas. The above image was generated using Mini Mi as a base followed up with photoshopping. Image Two References A. & B. Gray Ghost Fedora and Action Figure Batman the Animated Season 1 Episode 18 "Beware the Gray Ghost" is one of the greatest episodes of the any Batman cartoon. . It introduces a childhood hero of Bruce Wayne, the Gray Ghost who is voiced by none other than Adam West. It also includes voicing by Bruce Timm, the series co-creator. Batman's Gray Ghost Collection To further expand the significance of the Gray Ghost to all things Batman, the Fedora re-appears in Batman Beyond, utilized by Bruce Wayne as an impromptu disguise when Inque catches a ride to the Batcave...That's right, we even have a Batman Beyond reference. Bruce Wayne dons the Gray Ghost Fedora as an impromptu disguise C. A Foil The Wayne's are returning form "Mask of Zorro" on that fateful night. Zorro is also one of Bob Kane's inspirations in the creation of Batman. D. & E. A Book of Gotham Nursery Rhymes and Blueprints to Building by the Alan Wayne Trust These are references to the Court of Owls. F. Shakespeare Bust A Shakespeare Bust with a "pez action" head conceals the button that opens the Batcave in the original television series. G. Man of the Year Award In the Lego Batman 2 Game, Bruce Wayne beats out Lex Luthor for the Man of the Year Award. (I realize I mention this twice. I will update the picture to get rid of it shortly) H. Detective Comics #27 in Plastic Case The issue that introduces Batman to the world! The Batcave Our Batcave design is much more conservative than most you see: The "left" quarter of the batcave is dedicated to Batman's infamous trophies: The T-rex The Joker Card The Giant Penny Mr. Freeze's gun Green Kryptonite the "right" quarter of the batcave showcases Batman's equipment including a chamber for his suit. It you like the design please consider giving your support to our Cuusoo project. We realize the scale is a bit...impressive, and the license is, of course, in play, but we would sure like to get this concept to review regardless of production possibilities.
  12. WhiteFang

    REVIEW: 21108 Ghostbusters

    Hello everyone, I am very pleased to have a chance to work on this set review and to give my take on this very exciting new iconic LEGO set that will definitely thrilled many of us out there. First of all, I will like to thank Eurobricks and TLG for giving me this opportunity for me to review the beloved 21108 Ghostbusters set. Of course, without the success of the past LEGO CUUSOO platform and now currently known as the LEGO IDEAS, Brent Waller has achieved the 10,000 votes on 14 August 2013 and his project had went through the panel review, ultimately achieved the actual LEGO Design and Production status. And, this is where it has lead to. Name: 21108 Ghostbusters Theme: LEGO CUUSOO / IDEAS / #006 Year: 2014 Pieces: 507 Minifigs: 4 minifigures Price: USD $49.99, GBP N.A, EURO N.A, SGD N.A Resources: Brickset, BrickLink An original box image of the 21108 Ghostbusters Back view of the original box image of the 21108 Ghostbusters Different side view of the original box image (1) Different side view of the original box image (2) Different side view of the original box image (3) #006 LEGO IDEAS Before we expand and touch onto the actual set review, let's take a moment to re-look the past successful LEGO CUUSOO Products and it has created many new exciting products. I had never bought CUUSOO Products before, except the recent 21103 The DeLorean Time Machine which is awesome treat for me since I love the Back To The Future movies very much. Without knowing it, we are actually at the 6th product launch of this cycle where there is a migration of branding platform from LEGO CUUSOO to LEGO IDEAS. To mark the first official LEGO IDEAS product and the sixth LEGO CUUSOO product, the 21108 Ghostbusters is the selected product to mark the current transformation as indicated in the box art. What is LEGO IDEAS? So, what is this LEGO IDEAS all about? LEGO IDEAS is pretty similar like the past LEGO CUUSOO concept. To show and establish an unified brand of LEGO Product lines, LEGO IDEAS is introduced as a full pledged theme to drive the LEGO CUUSOO concept especially since LEGO CUUSOO is no longer under beta testing or a test bed to carry out new potential LEGO trials in selected market and global market by gathering votes and undergo LEGO review panel. The whole idea proved to be successful in the LEGO and non-LEGO community with this simple formula and approach. Build an idea, share that idea of yours, gather support to reach 10,000 votes to qualify for the LEGO review panel. And, if it is successful, it will be produced as an official new LEGO Product under the LEGO IDEAS Theme. It's that simple, so if you have the aspiration, then read this link to find out the working mechanism. Celebrating the 30th Anniversary of the Ghostbusters - 1 June 2014 In conjunction, with the celebration of the 30th Anniversary of the Ghostbusters, TLG has decided to launch this LEGO IDEAS set on the 1st June 2014 to commemorate this celebration. Through Brent Waller's model, TLG designers' Marcos Bessa (Senior LEGO Model Designer) and Adam Corbally (LEGO Graphic Designer) took the lead to design this project and transform it into an actual LEGO qualified product. Marcos took care of the iconic Ecto-1 vehicle, while Adam took care of the design of the Ghostbusters' minifigures. I will have to admit that both have done a terrific job to bring this set to us. Of course, without Brent Waller's determination and perseverance, this can never be made possible and a reality. This image is similar to those LEGO Architecture Experience The content of the sealed box Within the sealed box, it comes with 6 mint packages and an instruction manual to build up the set. After the building is completed, these are the remaining spare parts inclusive of the orange brick separator. The very nicely designed instruction manual The instruction manual has a smooth finishing and it is very nice to touch and hold. It contain many interesting facts and information, such as the origin of Ghostbusters, Ecto-1 film development, nice Ghostbusters quotes from the characters and a word from the Model Designers which I enjoyed reading the most. My only complaint for this instruction manual. It is very brittle and the pages are easily torn off from the book spine, especially when I left it wide open on both ends and flipped the page after next during the building process, the pages just got off. Anyway, please be very careful with the instruction manual if you are intending to buy just only one set. A sneak peek onto the instruction manual The instruction manual highlights that each of the unique torso is specifically for individual characters. Don't mix them up wrongly and take your time to look at the torsos carefully. The official characters' names Let the fun building begin It is pretty fun and challenging to open all of the sealed packages and pour it into one building pool. Even though it increase the building time, it can be very fun to search for the elements for each step that you will encounter. Personally, the total piece count for this set is good for people who prefer to build through this approach. Exclusive printed parts This set contain zero stickers and the above parts are printed bricks and tiles. It is always a wonderful treat when we are able to see nil stickers and able to enjoy the printed parts as it is. You get a total of 2 license plates for the front and back, 4 proton packs, 4 Ghostbusters' logos and a computer terminal. Please note that the computer terminal is not an exclusive printed part. It has been existed for a few years. Presenting the Ghostbusters minifigures Have a close look on the official minifigures' naming. May I present to you from left to right, Ray Stantz, Egon Spengler, Peter Venkman and Winston Zeddemore. These Ghostbusters are now in official LEGO minifigures' sizing and khaki brown outfit. The minifigures' appearance are remarkable and impressive. It has nailed the details very well and it is very pleased to see that lots of attention is actually given to these minifigures. You will find more exciting details in the next few sections. Back view of the unique minifigures with their names printed I did not expect to see that their names to be spelt out at the back of their torso or uniform. In this way, if you aren't sure of their initials such as E.S or R.S, then flip to the back to find the right person for it. Different unique dual facials What's best, all of them received a different set of unique dual facials which shows their 'exciting' side of their work. This is just totally brilliant. I could see these minifigures' heads to be found useful in minifigures' customisation. A closer view of the proton packs The brick built proton packs are very nicely done out and the printed part attached at the back is indeed welcoming. You can see the construction of the brick built proton packs through this image. The usage of the elastic whip is also useful to augment the aesthetics of the proton packs. Not forget to mention that the ghost trap for the Ghostbusters is also part of their weapons assortment and the ghost trap is very vital to their ghostbusters operations. Bouncing into action Aren't they look lively? You can see some good angles from the side view of the minifigure holding the proton pack and also the back view of the proton pack without the handle attached. The building process of the minifigures display stand The building of the minifigures display stand take place with the signature yellow and black to form the base of the stand. The Ghostbusters minifigures display stand With a few bricks, jumpers and tiles added all in, the lovely Ghostbusters minifigures display stand is now completed. It definitely make a fine display piece to house the Ghostbusters minifigures at a single location. It is great that the designer has given some thoughts to do up this simple and yet effective display stand. Presenting the Ghostbusters minifigures with the display stand Fully equipped and ready for actions With everything on, this fully assembled minifigures image is an eye candy! I will love to have this placed on my office desk. Back view of the fully assembled proton packs on these lovely minifigures The building process of Ecto-1 The above 2 images show the basic illustration of the building process of the Ecto-1 which has certainly involved lots of advanced building techniques to form the basis of the car. When I was attending the Eurobricks Event 2014 in Billund, Marcos Bessa was sharing with us on the design process of this Ecto-1. His main challenge is to attempt to maintain the outer facade of the original model by Brent Waller, keeping the structure tight and firm by reinforcing the sides, to achieve the realistic look of a 1959 Cadillac professional chassis, similar to an ambulance/hearse combination and ultimately achieving the LEGO qualified product. It is no easy feat to be able to keep many factors in mind. As the targeted building age group is 10+, it means builders at the above the age of 10 should be able to handle advanced building techniques unlike the much younger builders. Great pity that I didn't take a photo with him earlier, but it is definitely great to hear him share his insightful thoughts. The completed built of the highly sophisticated roof-top with some hi-tech gadgets I really never understood why the Ecto-1's roof-top siren looks ever so complicated. It looks as if it is being stuffed with some hi-tech gadgets to track or monitor. But, in actual fact, it is just a special siren that emit a very special sound when it is on the move. I tried to find some references but to no avail. Any Ghostbusters enthusiasts could help to decipher the special meaning of the Ecto-1's vehicular roof-top? Side view of the highly sophisticated roof-top with some hi-tech gadgets The finished built of the Ecto-1 Just simply brilliant! From the top to the sides till the edges, the Ecto-1 is coated with very smooth and sleek finishing. At one glance, you are able to identify and associate the built white vehicle is the iconic Ghostbusters' Ecto-1. The details are just plain amazing and it made me loss for words. The whole structure is firm and sturdy and I have positive building experience from the start to the end. Lots of amazing details ranging from the wheels, the back of the vehicle and the vehicular front. Side view of Ecto-1 You can take a look at the top side view of Ecto-1 and also in this image Front view of Ecto-1 Bottom view of Ecto-1 Back view of Ecto-1 Taking the top of the vehicle away A closer look at the interior of the vehicle You are able to see the vehicular interior contain 3 main areas. The front is the driver seat. Even though the steering wheel is placed in the middle, with some modifications and adjustments, you should be able to be place 2 minifigures at the front without the proton packs. The middle section with the computer terminal could only allow me to place 1 minifigure and I can place the last one in there, if I remove the computer terminal. The rear will be the easy storage and retrieval area of the proton packs. It is not possible to place all 4 proton packs at the rear compartment. What are they doing within the vehicle? This is the optimum arrangement without any additional modification on my part. I wonder if you guys can fit the same way as I do? Special guest in town I am very pleased to share this very exclusive coverage of a special interview with our Eurobricks Member, WetWired or also better known as Brent Waller of this original creator of the Ghostbusters. The featured exclusive and very special 'Mr Rebrick' LEGO Minifigure is used as an intended minifigure for the interviewee. How do you feel now when your design is now part of the official LEGO product line? It feels great, it's literally a childhood dream come true, I used to fantasize as a kid about becoming a LEGO designer, and although I didn't design the final product it's as close as I'll likely ever get. Not only that but as a huge fan of Ghostbusters it's a great honour to contribute to the legacy of the franchise by being responsible for the merger of 2 of my favourite things, LEGO and Ghostbusters. Why did you choose to make a Ghostbusters CUUSOO entry? I never had figures or anything like that as a kid, so whatever I was into I recreated with LEGO, the main 3 things being Batman, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Ghostbusters. LEGO had already officially released sets for the first 2 so I thought I'd take a stab at Ghostbusters for my local LUG, Brisbricks. I initially created the Ghostbusters and Ecto-1 to display at their annual expo. It wasn't until a friend suggested I post it to CUUSOO that I even though about it. At the time my Batmobile Tumbler was doing reasonably well for votes but everything else I had posted was languishing so I didn't even consider it before that. Did you do something special for promoting your CUUSOO entry and making it reach 10.000 votes? There's so many things I could suggest, I've been thinking about doing a blog or video or something with tips on how to achieve 10000 votes, there's some many things. There's no magic rule to be honest though but there's a lot of small things you can do to help your project. I've found videos on YouTube showing off your project help immensely, they reach people who would otherwise not see or hear about your project, that's one of the big things you can do. On the other end of the spectrum, making sure your thumbnail image of your project is interesting and attracts people to click your project is a huge help, the biggest part of that is making sure when viewed as a small thumbnail, your picture isn't cropped or cutting off important text or parts of your creation. Care to share your new CUUSOO projects? I only just posted my follow up to Ghostbusters, The Stay Puft Marshmallow Man, I have a few ideas for future projects but I've also been trying to promote some of my non-licensed projects on CUUSOO as well, in particular my Modular Costume Store and ALA-N: Astronautical Lunar Android 9. They're both projects I uploaded when I first discovered CUUSOO that I'm still proud of, being unattached to a license though they're far more difficult to generate interest in. My hats off to Peter Reid and his Exosuit being the only project thus far that has reached 10000 votes and passed review, that's a huge achievement without a license or real world object behind it. What other potential LEGO Themes will you like to see as actual LEGO products? I'd love to see some classic space reborn stuff, I've dabbled in that area for MOCs myself. But in terms of licenses, there's not much left anymore, TLG are covering all their bases pretty well themselves with stuff like Batman, TMNT, Simpsons and niche products like Back to the Future and Ghostbusters. The inception of my own Batmobile Tumbler project came from my disappointment with LEGOs own official Tumbler at the time which was simplified and aimed for a younger audience, so I'd love to see a UCS Tumbler. I've got no idea why my own didn't pass review after reaching 10000 votes but my hope is that that they've got their own one in development, if it was complete with a Heath Ledger Joker Minifig and I'd be buy it in a heartbeat. Comparisons pictures with the original model and actual model Credits to Brent Waller for the usage of the original comparison pictures. Permission is given for these pictures to be used in this review. So, after viewing the comparison, there are some distinct differences, such as the side rear of the vehicles, overall length of the vehicles, lack of chrome parts, design of the bonnets, etc. Although I never had a chance to see Brent's actual model, I personally felt that the finished product is pretty impressive and up to mark. Shall we nab that ghost? Let's catch all of them! Superb outstanding set ever To conclude, I have nothing much to add for now. Alright, I have one small feedback though, and it is the exclusion of Slimer. I really wish somehow or another, that Slimer can be included to make this set more complete. However, I guess the focus is more on the Ghostbusters theme as on its own. With a price tag of USD$49.90, there are plentiful of treats to acquire this set with no regrets. This set will definitely be popular among the LEGO Community and also to fans of Ghostbusters movies. It is certainly a great way to celebrate the 30th Anniversary with LEGO bricks. Summary review Playability: 9/10 (Fun minifigures and high playability with the Ecto-1.) Design: 9/10 (Very detailed minifigures and superb design of Ecto-1.) Price: 9/10 (Reasonably priced for all of the amazing parts and details included.) Overall: 9/10 (Get this set as soon as you can without hesitation.) I gave it a "5" based on my Review Score Card. What about yours? I hope every one of you enjoyed reading this simple review of mine. Comments and Criticisms are strongly welcomed. Pictures can be found in My Flickr and My Brickshelf (When moderated)
  13. Please post any cuusoo ideas that you have uploaded to lego ideas here. It will be a good way to see how many people use LDD for designs and it will help you collect supporters Here are some of my projects https://ideas.lego.com/projects/78290 https://ideas.lego.com/projects/78669 https://ideas.lego.com/projects/78669
  14. Blagnet

    Iron Man 3

    Hi all, I've just posted my first Cuusoo creation, it's the Iron Man Hall of Armour from the upcoming movie. There are 7 pods for Iron Man suit variants, rotating central platform with articulated assembly arms, display screens and storage units. I'd be interested what you guys think and any tips you have to offer. Thanks Ryan http://lego.cuusoo.com/ideas/view/38458
  15. 'If my calculations are correct, when this baby reaches 88 miles per hour ... you're gonna see some serious shit.' Dr Emmett Brown, Back to the Future So here it is! The long-awaited Back to the Future LEGO CUUSOO winner - and the first 'mainstream audience' model to pass the dreaded CUUSOO review stage. Few people can be unfamiliar with the iconic DeLorean Time Machine, and the lead characters of the BTTF movie franchise, Marty McFly and Doc Brown; despite having originated in the 1980s, with its fashion faux-pas and wildly inaccurate predictions of the Earth of the future, the trilogy is still surprisingly popular today, and is the sole reason why many have ever even heard of the unreliable stainless steel DeLorean car. It is hardly surprising then that the BTTF CUUSOO entry was able to garner the support required to enter the review stage, and the popular and family-friendly nature of the model and its parent movie lend it extremely well to conversion to a LEGO set. On paper, it should sell well; however, early leaked images have led to certain amount of disappointment, partly at the apparent lack of figures, and partly at the difference between the final version and its CUUSOO-winning original. Rest assured that Marty and Doc do indeed feature as figures in the set; as to the redesign: well, let's see .... Thank you once again to The LEGO Group for allowing us this early set review. Review: 21103 The DeLorean Time Machine Set Information Name: The DeLorean Time Machine Number: 21103 Theme: CUUSOO Back to the Future Release: 1 August 2013 (According to some members, it appears to be available already in some places) Parts: 401 Figures: 2 Price: GB £34.99 | US $34.99 | EUR 39.99 - 49.99 | AU $69.99 | CA $44.99 | DKK 449.00 Links ... Shop@Home ... Brickset ... Bricklink ... Peeron ... CUUSOO The Box Click for a larger full-frontal image As I pulled the set from the plain outer cardboard box it shipped in, I was momentarily disconcerted to think I had been sent an Architecture set by mistake, and I'm sure you can see the resemblance. However, here the usual Architecture austerity gives way to the colourful Back to the Future logo, and a blue-white clock and lightning motif that will be familiar to anyone who has seen the movies, and which continues onto the upper surface of the box. Any doubt about the inclusion of minifigures is quoshed with a little inset of Marty and Doc against a background which nicely matches the BTTF logo. The DeLorean itself is pictured in 'flying' mode, as seen at the end of the first and most of the second movie; as we shall see, I don't think this is her most flattering pose, but it isn't helped by the angle of the photograph - click the picture for a square-on view. The back of the box is rather busier, but demonstrates beautifully the full variety of the set: Click for a larger image The DeLorean versions of all three movies can be created from the set, though - as you might expect from the piece count - not at the same time. This is highlighted by the white-on-red text at the bottom right: itself rather amusingly resembling DYMO punch-labels that will be familiar to anyone who lived in the 80s. Small insets detail the wonderful printed parts which are included in the set, accompanied by explanatory text in English and French. This latter point - coupled with the inclusion of the piece count on the box front - makes me wonder whether this particular box is designed for the the North American market: the third language, visible on the right side, is Spanish. French will continue to feature prominently, starting on the left-hand side: In case you're not convinced that French is important in North America, the proof is on the box top, along with a wheel that provides the 1:1 scale here. The bottom reveals the licensing agreement with Universal Studios. The box is as wide as the Big Ben box is tall, but it's deeper and taller; in fact it's the exact same size as the similarly-priced Leaning Tower of Pisa. The contents are rather more colourful than a typical Architecture set, however: Sadly, we aren't encouraged to enjoy our building experience. Inside the box are five polybags, three loose plates, and a substantial instruction booklet that we'll look at presently. The Instructions The Architecture resemblance continues with this high-quality booklet, printed on sturdy paper with thick cardboard covers. The cover image is identical to the box front - minus the text - and affords us a clearer view of the car with its controversial front end. Inside the booklet, we are treated to a plethora of information related to the movie and the car, replete with pictures, and text in English and French (the latter on the facing page). Further 'DYMO' headers set the scene; the smart black background unfortunately shows up the dust. 'What - what the hell is a "jigowatt"???' I wondered at first whether 'jigowatts' is a mistake; according to Wikipedia, it's in the original movie script. I always thought the figure was 1.21 gigawatts, though with a soft leading 'g', in these times before the prefix 'giga' was rather common. My prized BBC Microcomputer from the same era ran games like Elite on as astonishing 32 kilobytes of memory; nowadays my 4 Gigabytes is still too little. Moving onward, we encouter further pictures from the movie with accompanying factoids, and occasional quotes. I'm not going to spoil all the contents of the booklet, but it is worth showing this wonderful rear-end shot of the 'real' DeLorean ... ... replete with its time-travel modifications listed as 'Highlights' (or 'Points Forts' if you're French, or Canadian). Architecture fans will be familiar with the black background of the instruction steps, and with the intermittent 'factoids' which accompany them: It can be a little tricky to make out the black parts against the background, but I didn't encounter any problems during construction. The build is nicely paced, with occasional sub-builds, as shown here in one of the later steps for the alternative movie versions: Here we build 'Mr. Fusion', with its complementary informative text. I can't wait to get my own Mr. Fusion in two years' time! The rear of the booklet contains the obligatory set inventory; page one in the inside front cover, and page two on the rear cover itself. Also towards the rear of the book are a page dedicated to the Michael J Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research, and the following dedicated to the CUUSOO winning design team: It should be noted that 'Team BTTF' have decided to donate their share of the profits from the set to the Michael J Fox Foundation. If I were ever to have a set pass CUUSOO review into production, I'd be more than happy with just a page like this. The Parts The 401-strong part selection consists mainly of plates - there are only about twelve regular bricks in there. I've managed to fit them all into one picture: As expected, black and light bluish-grey dominates the colour palette. 'Useful' pieces - a highly subjective concept, I know - might include the black and bley headlight bricks in reasonable quantities, a sizeable selection of 1 x 'n' plates, jumpers and clippy-hinges; it's nice to see the older-style hinge-bricks with 1-wide top parts in both black and bley. Greebling fans will approve of the binoculars, and the metallic silver 1x1 round plates and grille tiles; plain tiles appear in reasonable quantities, and they haven't held back on cheese wedges. For me, the stand-out parts are the 8.5L hoses - the modern version of the Classic Space original is becoming more common, but no other set contains more than three. Incidentally, I had expected that the red wheel hubs would prove to be an example of an existing part in a new colour; I was mightily surprised to find that it has been included in two sets previously - and Brick Buckets of all things! Though they are from 2009, and not widely available today; certainly there aren't currently any such wheels available in red on Bricklink. Taking a closer look at the metallic silver grilles, I noticed a mold difference: Some have squarer, thicker edges. This is hardly a disaster, but the difference is particularly obvious in this shiny colour, and requires you to be careful where you place them if you're particular about symmetry. Finally, the pieces de resistance - the printed parts: The detail in the prints on these 1x2 tiles is astonishing - look at the 'OUTATIME' licence plate with its 'California' logo replete with setting sun. I was a little surprised to see the 'destination' date on the time console - I don't recall 28th January 1958 featuring in the movies - but it's all there in the manual: it's the date the first LEGO brick was patented. Maybe I should have known that. And here's the 2x1x2 panel bearing a print of the heart of the DeLorean Time Machine itself: the Flux Capacitor: It's a beautiful design, although in my case the print quality isn't perfect. Note the white-on-red text, true to the movie, that has clearly inspired the 'DYMO' headings in the instruction manual - a lovely touch. And by the way, LEGO, it's 'i' before 'e'. I wondered if the typo in 'SHEILD' was true to the movie, but it isn't: see here. To be fair, I didn't even notice the typo until CopMike pointed it out after member Kez noticed it from the high-res pics sent out by TLG. The Minifigures 'Hey, Biff! Get a load of this guy's life preserver. Dork things he's gonna drown!' Here are Doc and Marty! They are the characters of the original film's 1985: Doc in his radiation suit, and Marty in his jeans and 'life preserver'. (I am reliably informed that this garment is properly called a 'gilet'.) Marty has his trademark skateboard. It's funny to think that skateboarding was a bit of a fad in the mid-1980s, and I doubt the film-makers expected it to continue to be such a widespread phenomenon today (your mileage may vary). I was a little excited to see a purple skateboard - it's the first I've owned - but it's also available in the new Town Square and one of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle sets. Doc wears 'vampire' hair which is new in white for this set. I had half-expected a variant on this, but the style they've chosen is possibly the best existing mold for Doc's flyaway locks. He has a new, double-sided face print, in flesh for this licensed set; they've captured his expressionn pretty well for the 'surprise/shock' look, which Christopher Lloyd does a lot. Great Scott! The radiation suit torso has some nice detailing including a stopwatch; I love the big trefoil 'RADIATION' logo on the back. It's a shame, though, that we don't get Doc in more 'everyday' wear; but I bet you could improvise. Marty's multi-layered clothing is captured beautifully, though he looks strangely like Spiderman from the back: His new face-print is again double-sided, with a little smirk on one side and a good 'fear' look on the other. His hair is a reasonably choice; the dark brown is a little too dark for my tastes - in the films it looks almost fair in some shots, and I'd probably have gone with reddish-brown. It's also perhaps a little too neat and short; 'Anakin Skywalker' hair might have been better. His legs, like Doc's, aren't printed, but this part in Medium Blue is surprisingly rare. Here's what they should look like: Picture from Futurepedia I think TLG have captured the pair pretty well, all things considered - particularly Doc's 'surprised' face. I'm also pleased with the choice of torsos; Doc's radiation suit would probably be the most difficult to recreate from existing parts (though the 'future' garb would be a close second); and it does allow recreation of the scene where we first meet the DeLorean. Marty's outfit is a no-brainer, and if you want him in a rad-suit, all you need is a Hazmat Guy. The Build The DeLorean is essentially a big stack of plates, with some minor Technic reserved for the wheels; however, there are some interesting techniques thrown in here and there. The chassis is built around three long 2x16 plates sandwiching two black 4x8 plates; four identical Technic wheel apparati occupy the four corners: Note the red and blue round bricks sitting atop similarly-coloured 1x1 vertical-clip plates: these restrict the movement of the wheels around the car's longitudinal axis, and are vital for the conversion between 'driving' and 'flying' modes. The surprising use of red and blue has some logic; throughout, 'red' signifies the front of the car and 'blue' the rear, and it can be tricky to distinguish end from end without this visual clue. In the second panel, 1x8 plates have been added above the 3L Technic liftarms, allowing them the be built upon; there are gaps adjacent to the wheel mounts, front and rear ... ... into which are placed clippy-bricks. Black 1x2 cheese wedges form the appearance of seat-backs, and again note the use of red and blue for front and rear. In the inset, behold one of my favourite ever LEGO techniques: the foot of a headlight brick sits on the side-stud of another, allowing in this case the SNOT-mounting of a round plate and the inversion of a cheese wedge. Granted, it's not as impressive as Svelte's use (see it in situ here), but it's great to see this technique feature in an official LEGO set. Next, the dashboard is added onto hinge bricks, and some Technic pins will enable the SNOT-mounted front to sit at a half-stud offset, at the expense of a bit of wobble. Clippy-hinges at the rear allow the attachment of the rear vent-things, shown in the second panel to be constructed from slopes, hinge-bricks, black headlights and tiles. I'm surprised they didn't elect for the Nice Part Usage of black minifigure legs for this build; however, the lower set wouldn't fit into the slope, and I'm more than happy about the eight headlight bricks. The light bluish-grey jumpers here don't do anything, except add some hard-to-see greebing, perhaps. The yellow 1x1 round is where the Plutonium goes. Plutonium not included in set. The rear-end is almost complete, as we add the Flux Capacitor on its 1x2x2 panel piece, and some SNOT-mounted taps which represent some arcance tubing or whatever. You can see some similar blue things here. Meanwhile, controversial tiles have been sneaked onto the front whilst you were distracted, and the diminutive roof is added. Clippy-hinges will help to slope the sides; the silver grille tiles represent the strips around the sides which glow blue when the car time-jumps. Finally, the SNOT front panel is attached, and the 'gull-wing' doors are added ... ... followed by the SNOT rear, sloping hinged tiles for the windscreen, and wheels. The last touch is the tubing around the sides, which utilises the various clips and O-ring plates we've been adding, and is surprisingly trouble-free to attach. And we're done! The Complete DeLorean 'Time circuits on. Flux Capacitor ... fluxing. Engine running. All right.' (Engine cuts out) First things first: however you feel about the stepped, tiled front, I hope you agree that from this angle the car doesn't look nearly as bad as the rather unflattering views of the preview picture (or indeed the box front). In 'driving' mode, she has a sporty, low profile, and the slanting pillars forming the 'windscreen', coupled with the narrow roof, help to slope the sides in a manner very difficult to recreate in LEGO at this scale. I will deal specifically with the question of the redesigned front end later in the review, for now, let's look around the model carefully. The front end's seven stud-wide SNOT panel helps to taper the car's nose; from this angle, the tapering looks a little severe. Note that 1x2 trans-black tiles are used for the headlights instead of separate 1x1 tiles; these latter parts are somewhat rare. The model does reasonably well with the 1x2s, helped by the studs of the light bley plates behind; I was tempted to replace the light bley with dark bley to mimic the darker front panel of the real car, but that would spoil the effect of the headlights. From the front, the wheels protude a little uncomfortably far from the sides of the car. I noticed one or two complaints in response to the revealed catalogue picture about the use of 1x2 and 1x1 cheese wedges for the front panel; this does cause asymmetry, but helps to strengthen the panel, as the 1x2 cheese connects the 2x3 and 2x4 plates behind. You could easily replace it with two 1x1 cheese wedges with little loss of strength if you desire. The rear view is one of the best, helped in no small way by the 'OUTATIME' licence plate tile. It's by no means a perfect representation of the original, seen best in the instructions picture above, but it is probably as good as you could achieve at the scale whilst avoiding tricky and fragile techniques. The big vent constructions help here, though it's difficult to line them up perfectly. They should overhang the rear lights (and have four layers rather than two), but even the CUUSOO original doesn't do this. The sporty look is particularly in evidence from the side: The rake of the 'windscreen' is suitably shallow, if a trifle awkward at the base with the 1x1 clippy tiles looking unaccountably large. This version lacks the rear sloping stanchions of the 'real' car, but dark bley cheese graters compensate somewhat. You can see here how the tubing at the sides creates the illusion of wheel arches: one of the few features carried over from the CUUSOO original. They work surprisingly well, and compensate for the protruding wheels, in most views. This is a good place to admire the contour provided by the inverted cheese wedges at the rear - a lovely, if subtle, touch. Seen from above, the car has a chunky outline which reflects the feel of the model in your hand. For the most part, she's very sturdily built, and at 190 grammes (6.7 oz), surprisingly heavy. As I've already implied, the roof is perhaps a little too small; you have to imagine the side windows would fill some of the gap here; a six stud-wide roof might be better, but it would make the door opening mechanism look odd, and I don't think it's possible to create the gull-wing doors any other way at this scale. Underneath are the only visible remnants of the 'red and blue' scheme which assists in the build: these clippy plates are as essential part of the wheel mechanism. The long dark bley plates make a significant contribution to the strength of the model; some of the light bley plates aren't strictly necessary, but I'm not going to complain. This rear high view is one of my favourites: The bulky rear end features a number of small greebles packed into quite a tight space. The vents take up a lot of room, but they are the most important feature. The blue taps sit above two barely-visible red 1x1 round plates; an offset cheese wedge in the centre provides a little contouring. The 'Plutonium Chamber' sits between the vents; it probably ought to be mounted slightly more forward, but that would leave a big step behind the tap bit. Note the binoculars on the roof; I didn't recall from the movies what this is meant to represent, but you can see whatever it is in this picture, or here (thanks CopMike!). The Interior The doors, of course, open in the gull-wing style of the original DeLorean: The mechanism works well: it is smooth, and doesn't require you to remove any parts of the model. It isn't without its problems, though: as you can see, the 1x2 male clippy hinges connect to the door using only a single 1x1 black clippy tile, and that is a source of weakness. Be prepared for the doors to fall off at regular intervals. Indeed, the weight of the door itself tends to disconnect the parts here; also, the closed door sits slightly higher than the body, and as you close the door it is natural to put a little downward pressure on the door, making the problem occur more frequently: Also, the triangular gap behind the door is a little unsightly. This is caused by the use of a 1x1 clippy brick and cheese wedge rather than the single 1x2 slope that the CUUSOO original employs. The clippy brick is necessary here to keep the black tube in the correct position. I can forgive this gap; it's not too noticeable on the model as a whole. Let's take a close look at the passenger compartment. With the roof removed, we get to good view of the Flux Capacitor in its intended place. For such a vital feature, it's a little hard to see from the outside, but it looks great. Moving upwards, you can see the banked black 1x2 cheese wedges which I presume are meant to represent seat backs, not entirely effectively: Their positions, and the studded floor of the cabin, imply that the diver is meant to sit just left of centre, which would make it tricky to place both figures inside ... ... however, the steering wheel is mounted half a stud to the left of this position. Th dash is otherwise very pretty, with the time console and a dial sitting at an attractive angle thanks to the hinge bricks. There's another dial to the left of the steering wheel. Note the light bley cheese wedge on the floor, which makes sitting the driver a stud further to the left problematic, but not impossible. Here's Marty sitting in what is (I believe) the intended position: He has to lean back a lot in order to fit his head under the roof, but for a sports car that is probably a realistic seating angle. With Marty sitting here, you cannot (easily) fit a passenger in ... ... but if you move Marty a stud towards the door - which involves a bit of a struggle as his leg interferes with the bley cheese wedge - you can: In this position, you have to sit both figures a bit more upright, else their heads prevent the doors closing: look at Doc's head to see what I mean. However, the roof here no longer necessitates them leaning back so much. The sloping 'windscreen' stanchions obscure the view a little, which in Doc's case is exacerbated by the angle of the shot. Note that in either position, Marty isn't sitting directly behind the steering wheel. Ideally, there should be some jumper plates in there to allow them both to sit at a half-stud offset; modifying the model to achieve this shouldn't be too difficult, but it would involve removing the long 2x16 light bley plate which runs the length of the car (see here). I don't think that this would weaken the car too much. Flying DeLorean - Back to the Future II Actually, the Flying DeLorean first makes her appearance at the end of the first film, but she features most prominently throughout BTTF II, and is instrumental in Marty's getaway from Biff in 1985-A. To convert model one to model two, all you need to do is replace the 'OUTATIME' licence plate with the orange 2015 'barcode' one, add Mr. Fusion, and flip the wheels for flying mode. Note that I've left the yellow 1x1 round 'Plutonium Chamber' plate in place under Mr. Fusion; the instructions aren't particularly clear on this, but it might be better to remove it and have the white dome attached directly to the 2x2 round black plate. Flipping the wheels is simplicity itself. Here's the mechanism with a wheel removed: The red (or blue, at the rear) clippy plate keeps the wheel mount from over-extending in either position, and explains why 3L frictionless pins have been used. The set also comes with two trans-clear slopes and 1x2 plates to use as stands: Roads? Where we're going, we don't need ... roads. This view is similar to the promotional catalogue shot that caused such a lukewarm reaction when revealed. To be fair, firstly, there were no passengers inside, leading many to think that no figures were included; secondly, this really isn't the set's most flattering view. With the wheels folded, she loses a certain something. Partly, this is the width caused by the protruding wheels, but it doesn't help that the wheels don't pivot around their centre, as the original's do. Achieving such a result isn't impossible, but would require a vastly more intricate mechanism, with resulting fragility and probably a too-difficult build. I'm going to leave the car in 'driving' mode. 'Western' DeLorean - Back to the Future III This is the car that Doc accidentally took back to 1885, then hid so that Marty could rescue it in 1955, in order to take it back to 1885 again, and cause your head to explode thinking about it. It's meant to have '1950s' wheels - big red rims with whitewall tyres - as the originals had decayed over time, and the time circuits burned out during the lightning strike, necessitating 1950s Doc to build an alternative using valves as transistors hadn't been invented yet. Check your head. Still intact? Good. Conversion requires removing a 1x4 tile from in front of the 'windscreen', then adding the greebled orange plates that represent the 'valve technology' time circuits, then replacing the bley wheels with red. There's only one set of tyres included, so you have to switch these too; but if you're anything like me you'll have quite a few spares lying around. You should also leave Mr. Fusion on. This is probably the car's best looking guise - the front box disguises the stepped front, and the red wheels rather counter-intuitively add to the car's attractiveness, even if they don't recreate the over-sized 50s wheels perfectly. I'm not sure why orange was chosen for the 'box'; I'd have thought either dark orange or dark tan would be better choices; certainly the latter isn't hard to come by in 2x4 plates. The red wheels don't quite match up to the big 50s whitewall tyres of the original, but I don't know how they could be better represented at this scale. Here are all three versions of the 'real' DeLorean for comparison: Pictures from here, here, and here respectively. Comparison to the CUUSOO Original Model If you've seen the original CUUSOO entry, you might already have noticed that the final version is a vastly different kettle of frogs. The most obvious difference - noticed and commented on, mostly disapprovingly, as soon as the catalogue picture was revealed - is the shape of the front. The LEGO designer has chosen to create the front end from a stepped construction of tiles, rather than using the more obvious solution of a 6x8 sloped tile as the CUUSOO entrants chose. Why did they make this change? Part of the reason may be the difficulty in recreating the third movie DeLorean. Here's the CUUSOO version: There isn't an existing LEGO part that would allow the attachment of parts to its upper surface whilst retaining the shallow slope. The CUUSOO team must have used an adhesive substance here. I can forgive TLG for not wishing to create a unique, specialised mold just for this set, so an alternative solution would be necessary. Is this the sole reason? To answer that, I had to examine the original CUUSOO entry a little more closely ... so I built one, using the LDD instructions the CUUSOO team thoughtfully provided. I've had to substitute a few parts; my 7676 Republic Gunship is packed away, so I've used 1x2 smoke tiles rather than the four 1x1s the original uses, but you'll get the impression. Immediately you can see that the CUUSOO version is bigger, and taller; it isn't wider, but the straight-mounted 'windscreen' stanchions make the cabin more boxy. At the back, the rear bumper is the same ... but that's about it. The CUUSOO version has replicated the dark grey area around the rear lights, but the light configuration is no more accurate than LEGO's example, and looks a little fussy. The vents are similar, but LEGO's are individually tilted; the original has rear slanted stanchions, but, like those of the 'windscreen', they are square to the body. Mostly, the SNOT-mounted white tiles - which represent the blue-glowing time-travel whojimaflips of the original, and simulated in silver on the LEGO version - stand rather too proud of the model, and look uncomfortably square. They're also flimsy: attached only via a SNOT stud at the bottom and a 1x1 clip at the top. The choice of white for the time-travel thingumajigs explains the white front bumper. It's interesting that the white bumper has carried over to the LEGO version, even though its side whotsits are silver. I'd have preferred silver for the front bumper too, but the 1x2 bows don't exist in this colour. This is more apparent in the top view. LEGO's answer to the silvery stripes does result in discontinuity, but it's more subtle, and doesn't affect the lines of the car. As you can see, the CUUSOO version is far longer: a good four studs. This does allow more room for rear-end greebling, but at the expense of realism: the DeLoraean is a two-seater sports car, and it's dinky. CUUSOO's roomy cabin has lots of room for detail - there's even a keypad for entering destination dates, a gearstick, and the Time Circuit switch - the last two mounted centrally on jumper plates, and which interfere with each other. To be fair, this is a plot point in the original film. The seats are placed at positions 2 & 3 and 6 & 7 of the 8 stud-wide cabin, giving no ambiguity as to where the passengers sit, but they have to sit bolt upright in order to close the doors. Opening the doors requires you to lift the windscreen stanchions; the 1x1 clippy tiles I've used here are incredibly stiff, making this no mean feat. Marty and Doc have to keep their outboard arms raised in order for the doors to close, but they sit in there quite happily. The steering wheel is correctly mounted for the chairs. There is, of course, no Flux Capacitor print in this version. The CUUSOO version is much bigger, but at 214 grammes, only slightly heavier - its destiny density is less. This is the result of quite a flimsy structure: There's acres of space in there - I'd have strengthened it; perhaps the CUUSOO team decided not to in order to reduce the piece count. I strongly suspect that the model is originally conceived would not have passed TLG's stringent quality rules. It's also rather over-complicated; look at the wheel mechanism for an example. Note that I've substituted a few parts (eg. light bley clippy hinges for black; two 4x4 plates for one 4x8). Despite being lighter by 24 grammes, the LEGO version feels more heavy, and more sturdy. 'There's that word again: "heavy". Why is everything so heavy in the future? Is there something wrong with the Earth's gravitational pull?' The LEGO version is a vastly different model to the CUUSOO original - there are very few features carried over. Having built both, I can fully appreciate the redesign, and the reasons behind it. What results is a far sportier, and far sturdier model; it better resembles the compact DeLorean, and even though the smooth slope of the front end is lost, the result is more gently tapered in both vertical and horizontal directions. If you are thinking of replacing the front with the 6x8 slope, it isn't as easy as it looks. The windscreen stanchions will have to be moved, and the slope will overhang in an ugly way at the front corners. Mostly, the slope is too steep: the DeLorean's front end is nearly flat, and using the slope will result in a much bulkier front end than is desirable. It is because of this - and the excessive size of the CUUSOO version - that to me makes LEGO's version look the part of a stylish sports car converted into a time machine; while, in comparison, the CUUSOO original - despite its extra features - looks more like a Volvo. I'm glad they redesigned it. Conclusion I've been looking at, handling, and playing with this model for some four weeks now, and I have to say that - despite initial misgivings about the stepped front, I really like it. Having also built the CUUSOO original, I feel LEGO's version is a far better representation of the DeLorean: more accurate to scale with the minifigures, and much more in keeping with the lines and style of the iconic 1980s sports car. It has its flaws: seating two figures inside, while possible, requires some manual dexterity, and the doors have a dispiriting tendency to fall off (a problem shared with the CUUSOO version); even when you inevitably come to accept the stepped front, the use of two 2x4 tiles in the middle section looks a little odd (easily rectified with a simple modification). However, the overall result is a delightfully compact, sturdy, and playable sporty roadster that you can push around the table, flip the wheels, then swoosh around the room. Just don't do that above 88 miles per hour... Marty and Doc are fine representations of the characters, and have unique torsos and head pieces (and hair, in Doc's case). Add to that the 'Architecture-style' box and manual, and the very reasonable asking price of £35, and you have an affordable playset and collector's piece in one. I heartily recommend it. Design & Build 8 Whatever your feelings about the stepped front, I think you have to agree that the designer has captured the sporty feel of the DeLorean well, and succeeded in upholding TLG's quality standards in the process. I think the car is attractive, and fun, and I would choose the sleek, low-profile design over the Volvo look any day. The build doesn't exactly set the world on fire, but it is pacey, and involves a few interesting techniques - the headlight-brick attachment; the use of clippy-hinges for the doors; and the combination of clippy- and brick hinges on the vents are the highlights here. Parts 8 I'm sure many of you would be able to build the car from your own collection, but you'd miss out on the gorgeous printed parts; and the black tubes aren't common in quantity. I don't think the parts selection would be a major factor in your decision to buy it, but I'm not complaining about the headlight bricks. Figures 9 Doc's and Marty's torsos and faces are unique, and Marty's wearing the iconic 1980s gear. You might question the choice of the Radiation Suit for Doc, but it makes some sense - it's the first thing we see him wearing in the films, and you could recreate most other costumes from existing parts (with the possible exception of the 'future suit'. I'm sure these figures will be sought-after. Play & Display 10 The opening doors, swiveling wheels and the ability to change the car to match each of the films give rise to plenty of play options; you can push it or swoosh it to your heart's content. Or, it looks great on the shelf. I'd also like to include 'collectability' in this section - something I will consider for future Architecture reviews: the attention that has gone into the box art and instruction manual easily rival that of the Architecture range, and truly make this set a collector's dream. Value 10 Even purely on a parts to pennies ratio, this is good value, even though the parts are mostly plates; add in the licence, the collectability, the figures, and the car's design, and I think the price looks very reasonable. Overall 90% My Score 9/10 I'm delighted with this set, and if you're a fan of the films, you will be too. I urge you to look beyond the stepped front end; if you can't, well, maybe you guys just aren't ready for this yet. But your kids are gonna love it. Thanks for reading! I hope you enjoyed the review. Please let me know what you think! Rufus Resources Back To The Future wiki: Futurepedia Buy a REAL DeLorean! DeLorean.com LEGO CUUSOO Winner: Back to the Future(BTTF) - DeLorean Time Machine My flickr set Endpiece (I should have used the Lone Ranger train for this. ) If you like my reviews, and would like to learn how it's done, please consider joining the Reviewers Academy:
  16. Came across this on Cuusoo. Check it out here, and vote your support. -----> http://lego.cuusoo.c...deas/view/58608 <----- I'd love to see LEGO expand the Disney Princess line. They did Rapunzel and Merida from Brave, so why not Frozen?
  17. jokerjester

    My Iron Man Hulkbuster

    The CUUSOO project for this build is now up. You can support my project clicking this link: http://lego.cuusoo.com/ideas/view/53350. I’m a huge fan of the Iron Man Hulkbuster armor and when I started to collect Iron Man minifigures I’ve decided to create one to add to the armory. My first attempt to create a Hulkbuster armor that can be piloted by an Iron Man minifigure is when I got my hands on a Kai’s Fire Mech set from the LEGO Ninjago line. As you can see in the first picture I only modified the hands and ditched the gun right hand design. I was already happy with what I came up with but I was not satisfied with my final design. After looking at the other Hulkbuster builds from other LEGO enthusiasts in different forums I’ve decided to rebuild the armor, this time using an additional Fire Mech set and parts from the Iron Man Ultrabuild set. My challenge now is to create a sleek Hulkbuster Iron Man build using only parts from these 3 sets (2 x Fire Mech, 1 x Iron Man Ultrabuild). Thanks to the additional parts from the Fire Mech the minifigure is now fully enclosed except for the head. I'm also quite happy that I was able to add more design elements thanks to the Ultrabuild's chest armor and the curved blocks and vents from the mech sets. The reasons for me not adding more parts are: 1. I want to keep the costs to a minimum (cheaper to produce and at the same time more (again, budget friendly to consumers) 2. I really want a design that doesn’t tower too much from the minifigures. 3. I want to use parts that are already available to the market (again, cheaper to reproduce. No need to create new blocks). Please support this CUUSOO project if you want this set to be produced by LEGO. This set would look great next to your Iron Man minifigures. For my next project I'm thinking of building an armor for Captain America or War Machine just for the fun of it. It may not be comic book canon but I just want to see a mech with integrated designs from the Captain America Ultrabuild.
  18. Hi everybody, A while ago I posted my MOC here and received some nice comments. Thank you all very much. A special thanks to Jim who frontpaged me, and to Osuharding1 who created a great .Today, I've published the Compact Convertible at the new Lego Ideas. As you know, when it receives 10,000 supporters TLG will consider making it an official model. I know it's a long shot, but I'd like to ask all of you to please become a supporter. Simply visit the project page and if you like it, click "Support". You'll need to login or create an account to complete. This is the first time I published something on Lego Ideas and the experience was pretty flawless. I like the new layout and the new wizard to enter all the project information was great to use. It took two days for the project to be approved. I would like to see more awesome Technic models on there though, so after supporting me please also submit your own MOC!
  19. I thought I'd share a project I'd been working on for a while! This is a Ninjago-themed Advent Calendar I designed to put on Lego Cuusoo. I put a lot of work into designing a variety of small and interesting models based on the theme. I did my best to make it with the same sort of constraints as the other Lego Advent Calendars. It has a similar part count, no new molds, and a limited number of recolored parts and new prints. Each model is simple and small in scale, and I took efforts to make sure that there was plenty of play value from the first model onward. I'll link to my pictures on Flickr, since I've already given them detailed descriptions there. Also, if you would like to see this as a set, I encourage you to support it on Cuusoo! Full Photoset on Flickr All Contents (pictured) Day 1 - Kai Day 2 - Anvil Day 3 - Toy Mech Day 4 - Weapon Rack Day 5 - Zane Day 6 - Snowball Catapult Day 7 - Toy Helicopter Day 8 - Snowman Day 9 - Cole Day 10 - Punching Bag Day 11 - Toy Driller Day 12 - Lamppost Day 13 - Jay Day 14 - Video Game Day 15 - Toy Jet Day 16 - Fireplace Day 17 - Lloyd Day 18 - Presents Day 19 - Toy Trike Day 20 - Christmas Tree Day 21 - Nya Day 22 - Tea and Cookies Day 23 - Sleigh Day 24 - Sensei Claus
  20. Hello, I have created a MOC of the Orca from the classic Steven Spielberg film, Jaws. I was wondering if you could give me your thoughts, opinions on it? http://lego.cuusoo.com/ideas/view/62906 I have tried to be as close to the original ship as possible, including getting the sheer and camber of the vessel. Some bits were quite difficult to put in, such as the curved railings heading down to the bow from the pulpit. I also couldn't find a rope on LDD for the barrel on the transom, so I decided to use a chain. Thanks for viewing!
  21. aualga

    My CUUSOO Projects

    Hi everybody! I have a few projects on LEGO CUUSOO that I think are in need of supporters! So do you think you guys can check them out and possibly support them? Thanks! Combat Racer Combiners: snip BXR 900: snip Raiko Chargers: snip
  22. EDIT: MY SUPERCAR IS NOW ON LEGO CUUSOO WITH SOME MODIFICATIONS. SEE NEW PICTURES HERE: http://lego.cuusoo.com/ideas/view/61930 Every spring I have a fever for a sports car, so now I created one of my own. May I introduce the Supercar Mocman Arrow Evolution 1.0 Black Edition featured with lambo doors and V12 engine. There's also steering in steering wheel and in rear fog light. The body is based on monocoque structure and the bottom is all flat. The features which I really like are the aggresive reverse rake (can be seen in the side profile picture) which gives the rear wheels good grip :). And also the rear diffusors and curved bricks between rear lights look pretty good in my opinion. All forms were created by using bricks which adds sort of "retro" feeling on it, so I wanted to leave some studs visible. The design is based on supercars from 80'ies to the 2010's with some influence of race cars. The car is 34 studs long (27cm) and 12 studs wide. Hope you like and all comments are welcomed. Thank you.
  23. glenbricker

    Vardo (Romani Wagon)

    ARg! Sorry I should have put [MOC] at the front of the Topic Title, but I cannot figure out how to change the title now that it is sumbitted. If someone can tell me how I would be very appreciative. I have been thinking of doing this project for years. But I was always too busy and could not quite figure out how it would work. Trying to cram a lot of curvy color into a Lego build can be pretty daunting. And then on top of that, making it as complex and "Modular style" on the inside as possible. I had a real blocker though. I wanted one of the figures to have a Lute...how do you build a Lute in Lego. Well, this kept just taking up brain space, kept distracting me. So I finally brought it up with my friend Alatariel. We turned it into a personal Iron Builder challenge. And that really just broke ope the dam. Even the Lute itself, just 3 elements was a collaboration that brought out the best of our styles. All in all this is probably one of my favorite personal builds. I keep working on the Cabinet though...cramming that much detail into such a tight space is a real challenge. The dimension of the bed worked out perfectly though and the dead space under it really allowed me to add a lot of detail on the back. Getting that ring in the middle of the "diamond" takes up a LOT of real-estate. This last piece is a "zoom in" on the Lute. If you are familiar with Patrick Rothfuss and his Kingkiller Chronicle series of books, well, this is where I got the idea for building a Vardo. They are real things. But reading the books is what got me wanting to build one. The guy on the Left is a "portrait" of the Author that I figure fans might get a kick out of. If you really like this you can vote for it on Cuusoo
  24. sixf00t4

    Cathedral of Learning

    I put this up on cuusoo in aug 2013, and it was at ~70 votes last friday. Thanks to reddit, then University of Pittsburgh, Then local media outlets, then a BUNCH of other people, like the Mayor of Pittsburgh, sharing it, it got up to 700 votes in a week, making it the 4th most supported project last week. http://lego.cuusoo.com/ideas/view/43478 more info about the build here - http://sixf00t4.com/2012/06/cathedral-of-learning-in-lego-bricks/ I have no idea how to top the exposure than Pitt sharing it. it generated about 8,000 page views, and from what I can tell on the projects that broke 10,0000 votes, they were at +300,000 page views. So, my support to view ratio is much better, but dang, how to break that many views??? I was hoping to just break 1,000 to get a LEGO official comment, but I think that burst of supports will be the peak activity.
  25. Raymdbrown

    Stephensons rocket 1829

    Hi guys Have finally joined you group please see my latest model below working on another 2 at the moment http://lego.cuusoo.com/ideas/view/59081 Thanks ray