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Found 115 results

  1. Mr Maniac

    Review: Deep Sea Refuge

    Hello everyone! Long-time lurker, (relatively) first-time poster! With LEGO's latest Deep Sea lineup having taken longer than planned to come to the U.S. (wonder if there's any world events that might explain the delay?), I decided to browse through some of the old 1997 Divers sets earlier in the summer to see if anything caught my eye. Sure enough, I happened upon a MISB edition of Deep Sea Refuge on eBay. Having played with it at a friend's house as a kid, I decided to snap it up. But with the newest sets having a state-of-the-art underwater research station, does this original model still hold up? Let's find out as we go beyond the sea (just kidding, we're going under it. Sorry Bobby Darin.) Info Set # - 6441 Name - Deep Sea Refuge Theme/Subtheme - Town/Divers Year - 1997 Piece County - 433 Minifigures - 5 Price - MSRP $60 US Links Brickset, Peeron, Bricklink, Bricksafe Box Aside from a few minor dents and scrapes, the box still looks pretty good. Love that sunshine pattern on the seafloor. Definitely way more inviting than the box art for Aquazone, Atlantis or recent Deep Sea sets. It gives off that peaceful tropical island vibe that quite a few of the 90s sets gave me, although it probably helps that the only foliage available at the time were palm trees or those little conical and spherical versions. We also have the very cool Divers subtheme logo in the upper right-hand corner, along with an old price tag sticker that's still on the box. I won't say how much I paid for this thing unless asked, but I can assure you it was far from the original $59.99 shown here. That said, that logo continues to be great, reeking of atmosphere. You can practically hear the Jaws theme playing as Mr. Mask and Snorkel here looks to the surface and sees the shark silhouette, wondering if it saw him, if he can make it to safety... Moving on, the back of the box gives you some very fun alternative LEGO models, including a goofy little water slide and diving board setup, along with a larger (and smaller) undersea research station. Overall, they all seem pretty good to me, even if the boat on the largest alternative model picture looks a little strange with the bubble windshield. But that's the fun of LEGO. Now here's the good stuff. Like most boxes from this age, we have a great inner flap with more set pictures and some flavor text to help unleash your inner Jacques Cousteau, which I transcribed for all of you lovely people. "The ocean depths hold many mysteries and dangers. Sharks, stingrays and possibly sunken treasure! With building sets from the LEGO SYSTEM Divers collection, only you, the LEGO MANIAC, will find the secrets of the deep." The same flavor text is also available in French and Spanish for those in the multilingual crowd. We also have the customary (for the time, at least) plastic window which has some of the specialized parts on the left, with a random assortment of parts in bags to the right, complete with fun little scenes of the divers trying to outswim an octopus while a possible Captain Redbeard shipwreck lingers in the background. I understand why LEGO doesn't do this anymore, but man, it'd be great to bring this back. The top of the box feature some attractive water patterns, complete with rays of sun hitting the waves and the top of the ship's antenna and flag, which suggests the boat sank. Guess the pilot should've read the legal notice on the side of the box, which clearly states "NOT FOR USE IN WATER." The bottom of the box has some more of that big beautiful water pattern, complete with a porthole-like window design for viewing the diver minifigures and all that sweet, sweet animal life. Plus a now-useless barcode. Finally, the sides of the box both feature another angle of the set, with a captured shark and a sawfish that's getting a little too close for comfort for one of the divers. Once you open it, the seafaring fun doesn't stop at the exterior of the box, with a blue tray that helps contribute to the aquatic atmosphere. Take all the bags out of the right partition and you get the instructions plus a small catalogue which shows the hottest sets of 1997. Had to take a photo of the Divers page, as it looks great, with none of the obvious computer backgrounds that most promotional art has now. Instructions No surprises here. It's about the same as the box front, except without the name or age range. On the back are those wonderfully goofy alternative models again, along with a small blue tag in the lower left corner, which would be cut out and sent to LEGO for a magazine subscription. It may be repetitive, but I'll take this over Win-Shouty Kid any day of the week. Here's a random page in the actual instruction booklet. As you can see, no call-outs for individual parts, although submodels do have little yellow boxes. This can make for a more challenging build if you're not paying attention, though it's what I'm used to, so no problems there. Given the limited color palette, you get very good color differentiation, along with some fun graphics of schools of fish swimming around behind the instructions. Pieces Here's the eight bags that'll make up the whole set, still freshly sealed from all the way back in 1997. While LEGO doesn't use the bags with holes in them anymore (presumably to ensure the parts stay fresh), they still have a nice tactile quality to them. As far as loose parts go, all we've got here is one long string that will make up the winch and one lone LURP, which were everywhere back in the day. Two tan 32x16-stud baseplates make up the last loose parts in the box. Not as exciting as some other aquatic baseplates, but does provide plenty of room for staging little dioramas. Here's my first attempt at creating a photo grid in PhotoShop, with four of the bags open. Again, much like the instructions, no neat and orderly numbered bags like they make now. Chaos reigns when it comes to what parts are in what bag, so you just have to open all of them. Depending on your point of view, it can be either incredibly frustrating or incredibly rewarding to scrounge around until you find the exact piece you're looking for. And here's my second attempt at creating a photo grid in PhotoShop. With another four bags open, we can get started...almost. In case you couldn't see what was in the one plastic window, which so ably displayed all the cool new parts from this subtheme, worry not, as I took another photo of the parts after peeling the film away. We get some more sea life, some seaweed, two minifigures that have been tragically bisected by the sawfish and a few printed parts. As for the parts of interest, we have not one, not two, but three light-blue bubble windscreens, which were the most common versions according to Bricklink and mostly appeared in Divers sets (and were always excellent to have). We also get some neat modified bricks which were quite rare, only appearing in two sets in white and five sets total. The white and yellow panels 4x3x3 with portholes are also somewhat rare, having only appeared in five sets total, and only two sets in the color white, both from the Divers theme. As for the white panel 4x4x6 concave, these parts only appeared in seven sets, including some older ones from the space theme. Both the white and yellow 3x3x3 corner convex parts are probably one the more unique items here, having solely appeared in divers sets, while the minifigure handjet was sprinkled among a number of themes and subthemes (no pun intended), including an Aquazone set and Alpha Team: Mission Deep Sea one. Perhaps one of the more surprising finds here was the bow top, 6x6x1, which only appeared in two Divers sets. All told, quite a catch. As befits LEGO's generosity, we get two separate DSS for this set. I opted to leave off the marine life ones that go on the LURP since we now have actual molds to fill the gap, but I ended up using all the ones on the larger sheet, as it helps give the set some more character. Fortunately, LEGO's not a complete monster, and does give us plenty of excellent printed parts to make up for all the stickers, including control panels, a diving flag and three fun sea life tiles that will be part of a play feature. While I don't think it's to the same level as Adventurers, we still get lots of nice accessories for the minifigures to use as they explore the depths, along with two baseball hats to wear when they're not. Minifigures After getting the minifigures into emergency surgery (otherwise known as my hands), they're back together and ready to go! While they work well enough as generic figs to play around with, the May/June 1997 issue of Mania Magazine saw fit to give them all names that, depending on your perspective, are either endearingly silly or irritatingly cute. From left to right, we have Cora Reef (I think), twins Tug Topside and R.C. Scooter, along with Diver Dan and Scuba Sandy. As befits minifigures from this era, no backprinting exists for any of these characters, although the front of their uniforms are on-point, with great little sub logos that suggests a level of financing and organization the blue divers from the same subtheme simply don't have. Here's the gang with all their uniforms and scuba equipment on. Now we have a little more differentiation among the identical ones, and some of the flippers come into play. Love how the red and black flippers contribute to the overall look of the uniform. A rear shot of Cora and Dan with their oxygen tanks on. Kind of wish LEGO still used these ones, instead of the dual tanks from space sets, which are smaller and less detailed. We also get plenty of aquatic life for this set, including two stingrays, the happiest (and rarest) dolphin I've seen, the common sawfish and octopus, plus a white shark that may or may not be great. Hard to say with the newer one from this year. The Build We start by building the boat, which fits in nicely with the color scheme of the overall set. Even the 1x4 red brick works given the color band that makes up part of the actual Refuge structure. Build it up some more with a crane boom and some steering... ...then after tying off the string to the winch and hook, which is one of the two most frustrating steps in the world... ...you'll have a boat! Though something's still missing. So, after the second most frustrating step in the world... The boat is complete! While I don't have too many of the larger brick-built boats from this theme, the design of the cabin is particularly nice with the raised platform for the sonar dish. Not to mention the stern of the boat works better than the one from Shark Cage Cove, which always seemed a little low. Some other angles of the boat. One thing I like here is how the number on the side corresponds to the set number, something that still gets done anytime you pick up a set that has a vehicle in it. Now to move onto the main course that is the Deep Sea Refuge itself. I was surprised the instructions had you start on the main model immediately after building one of the two vehicles, but so it goes. We start by building the base. The blue hinge brick in the center is part of a play function that we'll come back to later. Add some flooring and the all-important chrome silver knives... ...followed by some furniture and hooks that will make up the changing room for divers... ...and we're well on our way. But first, a sub-model in the form of an X-ray machine. Obviously sleeker versions can be made now, but it works just fine and fits in nicely. Now it's starting to take shape. The machine on the opposite side of the X-ray machine is supposed to be a microscope, though it may not be the best version I've seen. The changing room for divers looks good, and fits all the extra scuba accessories that come with the set. Once that's complete, the Refuge gets closed up and we start working on the rock formation. Add a LURP and a roof to the Refuge... ...and we're done! While Sebastian and Flounder may be missing, there's still plenty of room on the two 32x16-stud baseplates for the sea life and divers we do get from the set. Some more angles of the Refuge itself. While it's quite bulbous, the shaping actually works for the structure, even if the greenery is a little samey compared to the diversity of parts we're spoiled with now. Now that we've gotten through the appetizer and main course, time for dessert, in the shape of a yellow submarine. We start with the base... Add in some branded compartments and that fishy computer screen in rear... ...and the sub starts to take shape once we add the last bubble windscreen and the porthole panels. Much like Aquazone sets, this sub comes with two moveable arms, even if it's missing a magnet hand. Unlike Aquazone sets, the joints that make up the arms seem to be slightly sturdier and less breakable, since they use fewer finger hinge parts. Guess time will tell if they break as readily. Also of note are the parts they use for the hands of the arms. I've only seen the towball piece used as part of a winch before, so it's cool to see a different use for it here. And there we are, one yellow submarine! While not as fancy as the one used by The Beatles, it still pops nicely. Another two angles of the sub. If you can ignore my crooked sticker placement on the rear and the shoddy PhotoShop job I did, you'll see this is one sleek machine, a far cry from the Crystal Explorer Sub's bulbousness. The fence pieces on top, along with the light gray bar adds some nice greebling detail. Hats aside, the two spare parts here include a Technic axle and a trans-clear 1x1 round stud. Pretty basic. Play Features While lacking in such traditional fun-filled action features from our "enlightened" age like flick-fire missiles or stud shooters, there's still some good solid stuff here. The most interesting feature that springs to mind is how easy it is to get inside the Refuge. With two hinge bricks, the structure easily swings open. There we go! Plenty of room for Sandy to do her research and for Diver Dan to get a new oxygen tank. Here you can see the cleverness of using trans-light-blue for the bubble windscreens, making it seem as if they're actually underwater, instead of an ad hoc photo studio. The placement of seaweed right outside both of the windscreens is also a solid design choice, giving the illusion of swimming to a stingray on the left and Cora on the right. So I'm cheating here, but didn't want to figure out the proper exposure for a printed tile on black under a dark blue window, so I'm stealing from the instructions. All three tiles, much like the Exploriens gimmick (and maybe a few others) look scrambled under normal light, but once you look at them through the dark-blue window, you can see bones and other fun-filled secrets. Curious about what the Refuge looks like when closed up? Simply open up the roof and you'll be able to see the structure the way the minifigures would. Kudos to the designer for making the entrance to the Refuge four studs by four studs to fit an actual minifigure, although they lose a few points once you realize there's no easy way into the structure given the placement of the struts. The bubble windscreens are also big enough to accommodate a minifigure as well, which probably comes in handy if you want to do some lounging, and can open up. Much like the Refuge, accessibility is the name of the game with the sub too. The bubble windscreen opens wide to place R.C. in his comfy blue chair... ...and thanks to four hinge bricks in the rear, it's a snap to place another minifigure in the back, although this is clearly the less comfortable position given how there's no chair. And if a diver finds something they want to stow away safely, all they have to do is open one of the two boxes on either side of the sub. Admittedly, I don't know if the printed tiles would fit in here, but the coins definitely would, along with whatever other knicknacks they happen to come across. The arms on the sub are also just as capable as a minifigure's, and can grasp a number of things. You'll also notice that there's plenty of room to display the sub on the baseplate without needing to take something else out. And thanks to the miracle of trans-clear bricks, I can make it seem as if the boat is floating on the surface of the water, where our last few play features reside. But before I forget, the boat does have a nice little compartment near the bow for placing spearguns, hats, and whatever other accessories aren't in play. While lacking a hatch on the top to seal the compartment (along with an accessible way for the pilot to get to the compartment short of clambering around the outside of the bow), it's still nice to have. Last but not least is the boat's winch, which has plenty of string to reach the (imaginary) seabed. That 41L string piece can also attach quite easily to the roof of the Refuge, even if it's not exactly clear what it's function is. If you're a fan of the movie The Abyss, you could treat it as an electronic tether and recreate the scene where the drilling platform slides deeper into the oceanic trench by pushing the set off the table. Final Thoughts Pricing and Value - According to Brick Insights, which I use for this sort of thing because I'm lazy, the price-per-part for this set is $0.22, which is a slight improvement over its price-per-part back in 1997, when it was at $0.24, which makes it good overall. That said, I think this set was still worth it even if the score was worse, given how many rare and exclusive parts you get in this set. Speaking of... Pieces - You get three bubble windscreens, eight panels with portholes, some parts that are nice to have such as an anchor and a chain, along with plenty of seaweed, string and sea animals. I'd say that's a pretty good deal, especially when you look at how much you get, and the rarity of some of these parts. Design/Build - This might be one of the more satisfying builds I've gone through recently. With two vehicles, you have something to show for your efforts without it taking too much time. With a lack of small plates and tiles, you can quickly assemble one model after another, and it's all well thought out. The sub is longer than some of the other ones from this...ahem...subtheme, but still looks sleek with plenty of room to access the interior, and the Refuge is similar. No matter if your hands are large or dainty, LEGO made sure grubby digits of all sizes can get into the Refuge. While lacking some of the more homely touches that make up 2020's Ocean Exploration Base such as a bed, coffee maker or lamp, this one has the edge by actually making it seem watertight, something that is frustratingly lacking in more recent underwater sets. And the boat is a nice addition that didn't need to be included in a set whose main focus is underwater anyway, so adding one in is a nice touch, which I can't say for the more recent line. Playability - This review took me a little longer than planned, since once the Refuge itself was complete, it was hard to get back on track and finish the sub. There's so much to do, with all the divers, accessories and sea life that you can have a number of adventures and not once get tired. Swoosh the boat. Swoosh the sub. Swoosh the aquatic animals into the Refuge. Even if this is the only set you have, it's still enough to have a good time (although I might have to recommend picking up a set that comes with a shark cage). Verdict: There's a reason this is a flagship set, one that, judging by The Brickster's review, is still widely loved and appreciated. If you compare the more recent Ocean Exploration Base to this set, it's almost no contest in terms of what you get. LEGO Divers may not always sell as strongly in the aftermarket as other retired themes, but it's well worth your while to seek this set out. Heck, it even integrates quite nicely with more modern underwater City subthemes, yellow colorschemes and all. While this set wasn't the first one from this subtheme I was looking to buy, when I saw it, I figured it was worth the price. And boy was it ever. I suspect this will stay in my collection for quite some time. Thanks for reading! Comments and questions always welcome!
  2. Laura Beinbrech

    [MOC] FNS Inferno Patrol Boat

    In early 2078, several months after the final battle of the Final War triggered massive temporal storms that ravaged the earth, the survivors began to try rebuilding civilization. One such group were survivors of the old North American Union military on the East Coast who founded what would in a few years become the Federal Republic of America, a bastion of hope & freedom in the post-war world. Of course, they soon found themselves beset by enemies on all sides: The authoritarian Grand Duchy of New York and Hordes of Chaos to the north, the fascist, human centric New Confederate States of America to the south, vicious bands of raiders in the arid lands west of the Mississippi and pirates & sea monsters in the Atlantic Ocean to the East. Thus the new nation found itself at war & in need of ways to defend itself because war, war never changes.... One of the earliest efforts by the Federal Republic to defend its coastal waters was the conversion of abandoned cabin cruisers & other boats into ad-hoc patrol boats, one of which was the one that would eventually become the FNS Inferno. After several years (and once the Republic's naval shipbuilding program got off the ground), the Inferno was taken in, stripped down to its bare hull, and rebuilt from the main deck up. The hastily mounted twin .50 caliber machineguns on the front of the vessel were replaced with a 37mm manually-operated light auto-cannon mount and the aft single .50 cal was replaced with a 7.62mm minigun. The overall shape of the superstructure was rebuilt similarly to how the old Higgs PT-boats from World War II were designed, and eventually the forward 37mm cannon was replaced by a DARDO dual-purpose twin auto-cannon turret (this particular choice of armament was heavily influenced by some of the orc technicians who had sought asylum in the Republic, citing "more dakka" as their reasoning for adding such firepower to a vessel of this class). Thus the Inferno Class general purpose patrol craft were born: Captain One-Eyed Willie at the master plot in the crew cabin of the Inferno (yes this is one big Goonies reference): The business end of the Inferno featuring the DARDO 40mm mount & MK 51 heavy sonar guided torpedoes: The Inferno's Brave Crew: Anyways, I was up until 5am last night getting the forward gun mount to look right, and I hope you like it.
  3. A very simple technique (hijack/misappropriation of part) with part number 54090 Aircraft Fuselage Curved Forward 8 x 16 Bottom. The concept is super easy, and there are a lot of of people who don't know what to make of their airplane fuselage. They are so big. So there, with 2 parts, you have a boat hull, and in addition the studs are in the right place to put the tiles and plates at an angle, to make the edges. You can construct, boat, dugout, canoe, etc. Boat concept with Part 54090 by Horlack, on Flickr
  4. Hello everyone! This is my new moc! The airboat is at rest, when the propeller is rotating at low frequency, and begins moving, once the propeller has worked faster. 1 L-motor 2 M-motors Watch the video!
  5. Hi all, I'm a new AFOL, and I wanted to share my first MOC! I picked up a few kits at a garage sale and I decided to make a scientific research vessel. I didn't have enough blue bricks to cover the board, but I'm pretty proud of the water trail that I made instead. I was aiming to make the ship a bit cluttered with equipment, but I think I may have overdone it. I'd love feedback on it!
  6. Inspired by the small boats in the early scenes of the Lego Ninjago Movie, i made my own little boat, complete with a sail, an oar to push the boat through shallow water and buckets for fish. Ninjago boat (1) Ninjago boat (2) Ninjago boat (3) Ninjago boat (7) Hope you guys like it, leave a comment if you like.
  7. gianlucapressi

    [LegoIdeas] Eleonor Boat Restaurant

    Eleonor Boat Restaurant is a typical restaurant built on a river boat. The set includes a small marina and 9 mini figures. Eleonor is a modular LEGO Boat Restaurant. It is designed to be compatible with existing modular LEGO buildings and it is constructed on a 32 x 48 base plate from 1837 pieces. The model is made up from 2 modular levels featuring a cafe/restaurant and a hold with engine room and galley. Level 1 - The restaurant The restaurant has access from the marina crossing a small bridge. On the inside there are the counter and the kitchen, tables for customers and a piano designed to create a romantic atmosphere. The interiors are decorated with many details: table lamps, wall lamps, curtains, the counter with the cash register, the stove, the sink and the piano. At the stern and bow there are two outdoor spaces provided with tables and umbrellas. The roof has a window that enable the light to come from above directly to the dining room and to a little control tower where the boat commands are managed. Level 2 - The galley Below deck is located the restaurant galley, the engine at the stern and in the bow, two camp beds for the cook and the old captain. The galley is full of stocks for the restaurant such as: barrels, crates with fish, crabs and lobsters, barrels of fuel for the engine. Thank you! Thank you for checking out my project and for the support. https://ideas.lego.com/content/project/link/a0285bdc-2989-4960-9687-1efd19e50766
  8. 9 fingers

    RC catamaran boat

    Hello Technic fans. Now its time to show you my work i made 2 years ago. it is a RC catamaran with 2 RC buggy motors and 1 servo motor for steering. 1 PF m motor is for fake engines. Thanx to Buwizz for briliant solution to make this work so god. some pictures. and the video. thanx for watching. best regards, Valter
  9. Sparks bricks

    [LEGO IDEAS] 24 Gun Spanish Galleon

    Hello everyone! This is my first post here, and I want to introduce myself with my Spanish Galleon build! (excuse the pirate flag its the only one I have at the moment) The ship itself is more than 2,000 pieces with more than 15 yards of rigging. It has a total of 4 decks, which carry its 24 guns. I have been planning and working on this build for the last 3 months and very happy how it turned out! This is my first large ship I have built, and it comes in around 3 feet long (just the deck) and 2 feet tall, which means its about 1/2 of minifigure scale! I used a combination of different hull techniques that I learn here to give the hull its shape. I have yet to include sails but will be working on that shortly! I have different stages of the build on my Flicker which you can check out here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/183944563@N05/sets/72157712187520373/ Here it is side by side with a official Lego pirate ship! As you can see its more than double the size! Lastly this has recently been posted to Lego Ideas and your support would be greatly appreciated! I think it would look amazing with the upcoming Pirates Bay set coming out later, but also we need to show Lego that fans want the Pirates and other classic themes back on the shelfs! With your support we can bring awareness to this! https://ideas.lego.com/projects/87e933b4-7625-44cf-be1a-fda4369acdd3 Some more pictures!
  10. Today I've finally had a chance to take the new floating hulls - the first floating hulls in a Technic set,if I'm not mistaken - for a spin on a lake. Here's the footage with a few observations:
  11. ExeSandbox

    [MOC] Icebreaker

    A scene of a Land Rover Defender rescuing a fishing boat from the frozen waters of the Arctic. Bravery or foolishness? Originally an entry built for the "Show Us Your Land Rover In Heroic Moments" contest on LEGO Ideas. (To my luck, it won as a runner-up! ) I suppose the LEGO model speaks for itself, so I'll do away with the descriptions. More images can be found here.
  12. Once in a while, every Technic builder wants to build a Lego boat. I was no exception, but there's a lots of boats being built: how to make an original boat then? I decided to not design a good-looking boat, but to make it a tool for filming. This choice asks for a boat that can be quickly placed into its filming position, which means it should be fast and agile. It should also have enough remote control range to film on big water areas. The 1980's Power Functions remote is thus completely out of the question: responds very slow and outside, there's 2 metres of range. We all must thank S-brick for existing. S-brick (or alternatives) makes this boat possible: without sufficient range, there cannot be a camera boat. Many boats have a keel and a rotating propeller at the back. A submerged plane behind the propeller acts as a rudder. Sadly, a rudder becomes less efffective at lower boat speeds and the boat reacts slowly to it: turning the rudder does not mean turning the boat, it first needs speed (and thus space!) to turn. In Dutch ditches (where I wanted to test the boat), there is not a lot of space available for maneuvering. Having a a slow-responding boat with a rudder there means the boat being into the reed all the time. I therefore eliminated the rudder and mounted the propeller on a hinge. Any hinging of the propeller system at any propeller speed the boat causes immediate turning, which is a nice direct response on the steering input. Good theory, but when a single rotating propeller is mounted on the rear, the boat will rotate along its Z-axis. I'm not sure why this happens. It may happen due to the gyroscopic effect of the propeller or due to the Lego propellers not being made for water propulsion, but anyway I had to deal with it. A second propeller placed next to the first propeller that rotates in the opposite direction seems to to the trick. However, when you mount this system on a single hinge, the (larger) system swings out quite far and easiliy hits reed in the typical tight Dutch waters I tested it in. Also, in windy waters, having a single propeller at the rear means the steering is countersteering all the time just to sail straight on! To deal with the problem, I mounted 1 propeller at the front of the boat and one steered propeller at the rear. This means the boat always tracks straight (even when the wind comes in from any side) and that the propellers can be mounted close to the boat, reducing its draft. The boat is made from 2 boat hulls to create a stable camera platform. This concept worked, it gave a lot of control. I decided to use a race buggy motor as it provides a lot of RPM at low torque, excactly what a boat needs. As no additional parts (for looking nice etc) were added, the boat was light, controllable, fast and really fun to use. The steering is a quite unusual setup (for me). It contains a rack with a 24t gear, a PF Servo motor and a ball link system. This setup had the power and speed that was needed for the steering to be quick. The video The GoPro is mounted upside down under the boat. The high speed axle to the front propeller is also visible. For water level footage, the GoPro is mounted starboard-side of the boat. As the boat only weighs 831 grams, this effects the balance a bit.. Sometimes, I used a rearward-facing camera, mounted in a Lego frame and adjustable by a large linear actuator. The same camera, facing to the front. Due to the size of the boat, there are weight restrictions. The boat wouldn't sink with a mounted DSLR camera, but it would not be stable enough when the wind increases. The Sbrick and PF battery box are mounted on the left side to keep a low center of gravity and to restore the balance (the servo is not in the middle). The boat packs some power, which is visible from the wake in the water. Thanks to S-brick the boat never went out of range so it was also a really nice toy. It might have been faster with BuWizz though, but that question might be answered later. I think this boat really makes a case for the race buggy motor. It has good RPM and power for its size and in the water it never runs out of torque (a problem that can occur on land.. ). Hopefully someday somehow it will be made compatible to Powered Up, otherwise this hero will disappear in the shady realms of the past.
  13. Hello fellow builders, I present you the Flying Dutchman, the infamous ghost ship from the Pirates of the Caribbean film series, in LEGO! The idea came to me a year ago, while I was sitting at my desk when I cast me eyes upon the 3 official LEGO POTC ships on the top of my shelf: The Black Pearl, The Queen Anne's Revenge, and The Silent Mary. For years I had been waiting for LEGO to release a Flying Dutchman, but to no avail it never came out. Determined to build the ship myself, I embarked on an exciting, challenging but rewarding journey to produce a MOC which would take up its rightful place among my fleet and make it complete. More information can be found here at LEGO IDEAS. If you like it, feel free to support! Here are some renders below (more can be found on my Flickr page): LEGO Flying Dutchman - 1 by Scarvia LEGO Flying Dutchman - 2 by Scarvia LEGO Flying Dutchman - 4 by Scarvia And with the crew: LEGO Flying Dutchman - 6 by Scarvia The infamous triple-barrelled chasers in the bow: Triple-barrelled chasers (Out) by Scarvia Triple-barrelled chasers (In) by Scarvia Thank you for your time.
  14. boxyman123

    [BSBA] Cat A - Riverside Rocket

    Official LEGO set Riverside Boat 31093 (LEGO.com) Riverside Rocket. I tried to keep the same colour scheme and create something Benny would be proud of, so naturally It has lots of engines/ thrusters.
  15. This is a suction jet dredge I designed on LDD. I work on one of these things as a mechanic. The movement of the ship is controlled by six anchors, attached to the winches on the front, on both sides and on the back of the ship. It's not fully finished yet. I still need to build the compressor that provides pressure for the suction head. If you got any comments, questions or tips, shoot! :) thanks The two generators and the jet pump: The screening deck: The control room: The suction jet head: Lowering the suction pipe with the winch: Extending the suction pipe with the other winch: The movement of the pipe is controlled by two winches. You can see how the system works on the following screenshots: Lowering the pipe with the upper winch (orange): Extending the pipe with the lower winch (yellow):
  16. Hello Eslandolans, before even introducing my main character, I wanted to give a present to all the other factions. For you I have this little boat I built today. Even though I couldn't implement all the techniques and style decisions I had envisioned, because I ran out of the necessary bricks, I'm glad, I worked it out, without having to order new ones. The hull could have been a bit smoother, but I wasn't in the mood to destroy my first ship's long boat. Gladfully the lego football stadium came with a lot of green tiles. So after all these years, it finally was worth it:) The red touch was also a lucky accident, but it fits the coulour scheme well I think. And finally a ship I managed to use the official Lego ropes on. I intended this vessel to be a local fisherman's ship. Honestly, I'm new to these kind of games and therefore don't know, how to do it in the right manner, so you can benefit the best way possible. You as the faction can determine the usage and the best location for this vessel. If there are any problems rule-wise, consider it as a freebuild, that adds more feeling to the world. As for the storytelling part, I'm planning to include it in future posts, tight now, it's just a little raw. Greetings, Wellesley!
  17. Left a good job in the city Workin' for the man ev'ry night and day And I never lost one minute of sleepin' Worryin' 'bout the way things might have been Big wheel keep on turnin' Proud Mary keep on burnin' Rollin', rollin', rollin' on the river First off: I saw a similar steamboat on LEGO Ideas several years ago and just finally got around to recreating it from the pictures provided. (the project sadly never made it past several hundred votes, it my memory is correct.) I modified it heavily into the version you see here with my own tweaks and twists in the design installed, such as I added a second funnel, revised the placement of said funnels to the front of the ship, and removed the roof off most of the second deck. Oh, and I added three whistles to the top of the pilot's cab like those in set 21317. (Steamboat Willie). Also, my version does NOT have a swing-open right side like the original Ideas model that was my inspiration... thus you cannot get at the inside, and why would you want to? Their is nothing inside at all anyway on my version, save for the blue deck chairs on the top level. The name of the ship is the Proud Mary, after the Creedence Clearwater Revival song of the same name (as quoted above), as I figured it would be appropriate. This model will go with the rest of my Western models, on my Wild West layout. The captain of the Proud Mary is Thaddeus Sweeney, better known as "Old Man Sweet-tooth", for his habit of chewing saltwater taffy when the going gets tough and and giving candy out to the little children whenever he lands at small towns and native american villages such as Lone Tree, Nebraska, or Fort Legoredo, Colorado. He usually plies his brand-new-for-1872 stern-wheel steamboat up and down the Rapid River, with the Missouri River in Iowa at one end, and the the mighty cliff face of Showdown Canyon Springs at the other end in the middle of Colorado. Thaddeus is the only one he trusts to handle his ship, as he says the Rapid River is too treacherous for many newer pilots, as the wrecks that litter the shoreline prove. However, even Captain Sweeney admits from time to time that age is catching up to him, and he has been looking for a suitable first mate for the Proud Mary for some time.
  18. I’ve been wondering for a while what on earth Creator Expert 10269 is going to be, and as I could find barely anything about it, I thought this thread would be the way to find out more. 10269 (Vehicle D2C Set) is described on Brickset simply as that, with absolutely nothing else to tell us what it is. Does anybody know anything about it at all, apart from ‘vehicle’ and ‘creator expert’? It could be a train, a car (though unlikely as the Ford Mustang has just been released), a plane, a ship, a shuttle or something completely new. The only thing I can possibly think of is an Emerald Night 10th anniversary rerelease, though I can’t see why they would do that. Please share your thoughts on this set below. UPDATE: LEGO has revealed the Creator Expert vehicles range, 10269 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy! 1023 pieces US $99.99 – CA $139.99 – DE €89.99 – UK £84.99 – FR €94.99 – DK 799DKK – AUS $159.99 AUD Available on the 1st of August, with VIP early access from the 17th of July. Build and display your own Harley-Davidson Fat Boy motorcycle! Explore the finer details of iconic engineering with the LEGO Creator Expert 10269Harley-Davidson Fat Boy motorcycle. Developed in partnership with Harley-Davidson, this highly detailed LEGO motorcycle captures the magic of the real-life machine, from its solid-disc Lakester wheels with beefy tires to its teardrop fuel tank with printed logos and inbuilt speedometer. Other features include a Milwaukee-Eight engine with moving pistons, dual exhaust pipes, handlebar steering, moveable gearshift pedal and brake levers, kickstand and a sturdy display stand. Finished with a dark red and black color scheme, this amazing display model makes a truly iconic centerpiece for the home or office. This advanced LEGO set provides an immersive and rewarding building experience. Features solid-disc Lakester wheels with beefy tires, teardrop fuel tank with Harley-Davidson logos and inbuilt speedometer, Milwaukee-Eight engine with moving pistons, dual exhaust pipes, handlebar steering, moveable gear shift pedal and brake levers, kickstand and a sturdy display stand. Comes with an authentic dark red and black color scheme. This LEGO motorcycle makes an iconic centerpiece for the home or office. Spin the rear tire to see the Milwaukee-Eight engine pistons spring to life. New-for-July-2019 decorated elements include 2 dark red 2x4 tiles printed with the Harley-Davidson Fat Boy tank emblem. Special elements include a new-for-July-2019 rear rim with super-wide tire. Measures over 7” (20 cm) high, 7” (18 cm) wide and 12” (33 cm) long.
  19. I'm trying to build a waterproof LEGO (power-) boat using a 54779 Hull. Have already attached the hull to the deck using silicone but haven't found a way to build a hatch on top of the deck in order to: 1. Protect the electronics inside and 2. be able to easily remove the deck to switch the battery inside the boat on and off. Just covering the deck with base-plates is (unfortunately) not enough. Water is still finding a way inside. Putting plastic foil under the base-plates is a mess. The remaining option (so far) is to make a silicone mold which then works as a rubber strip between the deck and the baseplates to stop the water from going under the baseplates. Definitely not a method with guaranteed success. Anybody any tips? https://drive.google.com/file/d/168JsCBVT6ALASfuV-NYymiWoyGaMogaN/view?usp=sharing
  20. After seeking out the Olean consul, Montoya now had to find conveyance back to King's Harbour and had made his way to the Jameston docks, where he had found a midshipman of a Royal Navy vessel. "Aye sir, we're off a brig lying in the roads, which will be going west as soon as we've watered and resupplied" the midshipman reported. "And unless new orders have arrived, we are indeed heading for King's Harbour" Turning to a sailor, he barked: "Take care with those barrels, Johnson - we don't want them spilling good rum now, do we?" and back to Montoya: "Beggin' yer pardon, sir. Requirements of the service and all that... We can find room for you, your assistant and limited dunnage in the boat. I am sure the capt'n 'll accommodate you shipboard, sir." "Just be back here this at 2 this afternoon, and I'll take you out" __________________________________________________________ Overall shot of the build. I think this warehouse/dock will be licensed as a commerce in Jameston, while I might license the boat as a class 1. C&C is, as always, welcome.
  21. BrickLdeas

    AIRBOAT MOC

    Air-boat moc which was fun to build with just a few pieces. video of more detail review:
  22. ParmBrick

    [MOC] Lego NSW RHIB

    The NSW RHIB is a 11 meter long rigid hull inflatable boat powered by twin diesel engines. The primary role of the NSW RHIB is insertion and extraction of Special Operations Forces (SOF), typically Navy SEALs. Other roles include general patrol duties, coastal surveillance and resupply. The vessel features saddle-seats for the SWCC crew and up to 8 passengers. NSW RHIB equipment includes trasponder, gps, radar and satellite. Lego NSW RHIB (1) by Jordan Parmegiani, su Flickr Lego NSW RHIB (2) by Jordan Parmegiani, su Flickr
  23. The commissioning of Cormorant has opened up a new path to small entrepreneurs or adventurers, here we have the Jacques brothers, who have invested their savings in a small cutter, filled it with vegetables and fruits, and sailed away. I really liked Keymonus's boat so I decided to try my hand. The hull measures 34 studs long and 9 studs wide, the hull is shaped by hinges and connected to the bottom plate with hinges as well. It's supposed to be a class 1 cutter, unarmed, it should count on maneuvrability to outrun a pirate. C&C are welcome. Vive le Roi!
  24. Jack Sparrow-

    HMS Endeavour/Dauntless WIP

    The HMS Endeavour/Dauntless from the official Lego Pirates Of The Caribbean game. I tried to make it look as much like the game model. Took around 40 hours to build including playing the Port Royal level over and over. Modular decks for easy disassembly. Doesn't have an interior yet. Any suggestions? And when I try to import it from stud.io it says 0 parts on my baseplate and wanted list (see pictures). Want to buy the parts via bricklink. Cant upload pictures due to size limit of 0.1MB.
  25. (believe it or not, but this is the first finished ship I am presenten on EB) I present to you the DMDR 6, a small cutter rigged ship, used as a dispatch runner: I used MSPaint to show some stays as that isn't really feasible in LDD. For pictures with (or without) you can check my Flickr (link in the signature), also some WIP pictures there, if you are curious about the hull shape. (Not a full hull but it continuous a bit below the water. Principle dimensions: LOA 58 studs BOA 14 studs Hull length 41 studs Waterline 35 studs Mast height above deck (not counting the spar for the gaff tops'l) 42 studs If you have questions like, what is she doing here, where is she going, who owns her, what does DMDR stand for. They will be answered when she docks :) All C & C most welcome. Bart