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Found 325 results

  1. richpantson

    PF powered wagon

    hello decided to start my BR Class 08 project and when sourcing parts I came across my PF powered wagon. I am planning in putting all the PF components into the Class 08 body, but having this push it around might be a good option while I sort out the mechanics for the 6 wheels. (PF train motor only has 4 wheels) Anyways for anyone interested heres my PF wagon and pushing my "Ruby Night"
  2. This is my DIY LED lights on a budget. White 5mm LEDs are 2 cents each and resistors are 4 cents each on eBay. A large spool of wire-wrap wire costs around $5-7. Do-It-Yourself LEGO LED Light by dr_spock_888, on Flickr I tapped into the 9V and GND lines of the IR Receiver for power. Note this will void your warranty. Do so at your own risk. I fed the wires through the pin holes on the receiver. No drilling or cutting needed. I sandwiched the LED between two Technic 1x2 bricks. The 5mm sized LEDs fit right in the Technic hole. I decided to try wire-wrapping instead of soldering. It might be easier to disassemble later on. The LED turns on when the battery pack is turned on. It makes a good reminder to turn off the battery pack when done playing. Little Yellow Locomotive by dr_spock_888, on Flickr The hard part was calculating what size resistor to use to limit the current to the LED. Too much current will blow the LED. Tools used were small Philip head (+) screwdriver, wire cutter & stripper, soldering iron, wire-wrap tool, and tweezers. Plus a multimeter to verify polarity.
  3. Paperinik77pk

    MOC - 7720 reloaded (DB E69)

    Hi all, I'd like to show you a little thing I made 6 years ago for my daughter...and then became unused on the shelf since it was "retired" by Duplo trains. It was a sort of DB E69, used to transport frogs and penguins (all made with Lego Basic sets instructions). After she saw the real 7720 she liked the whole set. So I created a newer "clone" of the 7720 locomotive. This weekend I decided to revamp it a bit to make it work again. So I modified the roof, the handrails, the pantograph (which now is very similar to swiss ones) and made it a bit more "studless". The battery car is now blue instead of Yellow. It was - and still is - powered by a Medium PF motor, since it was not Infrared controlled and the standard PF train motor was too fast. Instead of IR receiver, it kept a "vintage" solution to be started. I used the PF lever the same way the 7720 used the red lever on battery box car. The IR receiver can be put inside the battery car if needed. As you can see, I have the same 7720 inverters placed on PF track...and the result is the following (sorry for the video quality, the phone cannot do better than this). The cat likes this "reversing" feature a lot! Next steps: two long two axles wagons resembling the 7720 ones, and the white doors on blue wagon created in SNOT mode (or a simple sticker, if I fail ) It is a silly train, but I hope you like it!
  4. Tommy Styrvoky

    E-100 super heavy tank

    Lego RC E-100 super heavy tank by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr I have been busy with my latest model, the WWII German prototype vehicle E-100. This one being my second rendition of it since 4 years ago, when I started building MOCs. This one is smaller and greatly improved scale accuracy. more information and photos on my blog. http://tommystyrvoky.blogspot.com/2018/02/e-100-super-heavy-tank.html instructions https://www.rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-13061/TommyStyrvoky/rc-e-100-super-heavy-tank/#comments The process of rendering all of the animations for this video took some time, as I rendered all of this on my laptop, the end result, each frame requiring about 5 minutes at only 720p , and well there are a few thousand frames rendered for the animations, and I also completely redid my channel outro with the new PBR shaders from Meccabricks. Lego RC E-100 super heavy tank by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr And after all of that time rendering I realized that I forgot to include the second turret hatch... This is probably one of my most accurate vehicles so far, given the constraints of lego, and the mechanical challenges. Though I am still striving to do better in the future. Lego RC E-100 super heavy tank by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr and a comparison with blueprints from the real one. E-100 Blueprint overlay by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr
  5. For those who are interested, I put together a review and Lepin vs LEGO comparison on my blog. Details are here.
  6. To be honest this video was supposed to be my video releasing a new version of the RC Car with Sbrick along with some instructions. However, after a request for a build battle by LEGO Technic Mastermind, I have decided to postpone that video, but that will happen sometime in the future. In the meantime, I have made a rear-wheel drive sports car with an opening hood, small-cylinder V8 engine, functional headlights and taillights with PF LEDs, full independent suspension on all four wheels, a steered front axle with toe in (steered by a PF servo), and a four speed manual gearbox driven by 4 PF L-motors. To control all the powered functions, I have used two Sbricks, each connected to their own AAA battery box. I have not much else to say, just enjoy the video and photos below.
  7. The Lego brick turned 60 years old, so I thought I need to celebrate it with a fun little Technic creation. Nomen est omen - I created a racing brick :) I wanted to have a brick built cover first but I quicky realised that I do not have enough system bricks of the same color to create the studs. Then I found my son's lunchbox, and things escalated quickly :) This was just a very quick build yesterday evening, nothing special inside - 2 geared up L motors driving the rear wheels through a differential, Servo for steering, V2 receiver and a rechargeable battery box. Wanted to stick to original Lego PF components this time :) It's a fun little ride, might refine it later on. This is how it looks like without the cover:
  8. wrduncan3

    Fine control for LEGO trains

    When I drive my trains, I find that when trying to slow them down as they come around a curve I often end up stopping them instead. Some time ago, I saw a post (maybe here, maybe not) that showed how to add a structure to the remote (8885) to provide better control, but now I can't find it. Can anyone help?
  9. Today I present you the Dual-crane Pipe Transporter, a vehicle that came directly out of my mind. I mean, in my remain, I never seen a +real+ vehicle like this one. This kind of vehicle could actually been used on construction site of oilfield for the transport, the tracks allow a low ground pressure and good traction so it is suitable for every environment. The full review with all images are avialble at superk-technic.com/pipetransporter. I based the design of the Transporter on two vehicles from my Idea collection. The lateral reach stacker Meclift ML5016SR (on my to-do list for 2018) and a classical side loading container trainer similar to what has been released in the Mack Anthem 42078 set. The Dual Crane Pipe Transporter is a tracked vehicle equipped with a large flatbed to transport pipe of long loads, a dual articulated crane, 4 outriggers, a sliding cabin for improved view and a counterweight. The Power functions elements used in this MOC: 2 PF-L for propulsion (1 per track) 1 PF-M for the crane main structure w/ linear actuator 1 PF-M for crane articulation w/ mini linear actuator 1 PF-M for outriggers w/ 1 mini-LA per outrigger 1 PF-M for winches 1 battery box used as counterweight Plus 2 SBricks Bluetooth controllers. Thank you for reading.
  10. I've searched for an answer to this for a long time, and I'm hoping I can get some help here. I'm working on a Technic car that uses PF motors to be a mobile vehicle. However, I've found time and time again that the model ends up being just too slow for my liking (if anyone has owned the 4x4 Crawler set, you know what I mean by slow). I own 2 L-Motors, 5 M-Motors, 1 XL-Motor. My question is: How do I make the model have faster speed without it looking like a skeleton car, and also, does adding additional motors increase power? For example, if I gear together 4 M-Motors so that they all end up on one drive axle, is their power combined?
  11. Our German speaking friends of 1000steine have started a discussion on the Future of power functions (Original link, In German) The reasoning is as follows: - Power functions is now 10 years old - The newest sets including the Mack don't include PF - Bluetooth (4.x/5) seems to be the way to go seeing the success of SBricks While I don't think LEGO has a good replacement for PF at this moment and also don't see how LEGO Booster or WeDo (the latter uses PF in fact of course) would replace it, but I also see that those new sets lack PF. Any people that know more and are not under NDA by TLG? B.t.w. to add some more possible fuel to the discussion: at the Medica (Compamed) conference in Düsseldorf I have spoken several times with the two companies that co-produce Power Functions for LEGO, they weren't there last week (last year they still were though!).
  12. Hey guys, For the last few weeks I've been working on something that I have never seen done before. I was inspired by Jkbrickworks kinetic contraptions so I decided to make my own, kinetic, motorized AT-AT Walker. This build has just over 600 parts and took me about 12 hours to build, most of which was in getting the moving mechanism to work :) I have made instructions for it and you can get them here: https://www.ebay.ca/itm/222759462918?ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1555.l2649 The instructions and renderings are for my 2nd version (Much better) and the video is of my 1st version, just so you don't get confused but the only changes are some colors :) I hope you like my moc and any feedback would be great! Thanks, MM
  13. TmoneyTechnic

    Lego RC Car with Sbrick

    Here's a little something I've been working on for a while now, mainly because I just didn't have time to edit the video. Instructions should come out late 2017 to early 2018. The video link is below, and some pictures after that!! Before anyone else asks, I fixed the steering, it was something purely wrong with my configured profiles settings for the Sbrick, but no one could have known that ;) Enjoy!
  14. After some days of "try and error", I finally have a first motorized working version of the Joker Manor's Roller Coaster https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dc0vSOunDqY Here you are a picture of the modification: Of course there is room for improvement, but actually it works quite well. Now I have to do some make-up
  15. Some month ago, I found a random image of what looks like an exploration truck. As i did not have enough info on the real machine it was impossible to use it as reference, so, some choice have been made: Mini size : not enough part to build something big when I started (other stuff in progress and cancelled since, that's why) A classical front wheel steering would have been possible, but very fragile due to the size of the vehicle. And I will need a pivot + linear actuator system for a future project, so it was a good opportunity to use it. No differential, because size matters. Suspension if possible Tracks, of course. The full album is available on FlickR. Power function part used : 1x PF-M for Steering trough mini Linear Actuator 1x PF-M for AWD propulsion without differential IR receptor Rechargeable battery Cabin is reaaaaaly ugly. One day I will be able to make cool design. Unfortunately/fortunately, after I had finished this little boi, I found a new picture of the real vehicle. But not searching with "arctic/exploration truck", I had all wrong since the beginning. This thing is actually an Oilfield flatbed truck: the Cossack from ATK: Guess what ? It will soon be a real thing. Bigger, with some function. Best regards
  16. I'm happy to present to you my first modular building. I have put it on Ideas too, so if you like it, please support: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/106103. edit: It is now available on Rebrickable Some time ago my daughter got this Duplo set from her aunt: http://brickset.com/...ative-Ice-Cream That got me thinking I could use one of these cones for my own purposes, especially since my little one was very interested in throwing bricks across the room, instead of proper play (or maybe that was proper play ;) ). Anyway I borrowed four bricks from her (I honestly intend to give those back to her) and thought it would be nice to make a big advert out of this ice cream and make it rotate. Such an Ice Cream Parlor should have nice clientele drawn by this big sign of what's inside :) So power functions was a must. But since I was to integrate PF info a modular, why not go further and add some lights too? When I was young (long time ago...) I always liked things that moved and had lights :P so you can call it late compensation :P Later on I will present it module by module, but if you want to have a quick look at it in action, here's a video: Ok, so let's start with a view of all the modules separately: And now let's talk about the ground floor: As you can see, on the right there is the ice cream parlor with seating available inside and at the back of the building. You can buy ice cream, lemonade, donuts and coffee. The staff is taken from the Ice Cream Machine set :) I'm happy with the bench - it gave me some headache, but I wanted to have something distinctive. The lamp is also different to typical one, but it's nothing special. On the left there is an entrance to the owner's apartment. There is also a small storage room for bike. The top of it is removable for easier access, but you can get the bike in and out through the door (but it's tricky). Ok, now - the heart of the modular - the Power Functions module: All electronic components are here. That is: 1 Rechargeable battery 2 switches 3 sets of PF lights (so 6 sources of lights total) 1 M motor Of course apart from that there are also all the technic components to make it work. The motor is running the Duplo brick with a 1:9 reduction. The lights are provided for the ice cream parlor (4 of them), entrance to the staircase (1) and the apartment (1 for the table lamp seen above). My idea was to be able to control lights and motor separately, that's why I have 2 switches here. Look closely at the picture above. There are two holes for technic axles above. The one on the left is for access to the switch controlling the motor (advert). The hole on the right allows access to the switch controlling all the lights. Those go on/off simultaneously. You can't have just part of them on. That would require even more switches and there is simply no room for that. It's crammed inside already. Now, have a look at the bottom of this module where all the lights can be seen and the front of this module, which allows access to the rechargeable battery in case you need to recharge it (power cord access). Through the holes in the front section you can turn the battery on/off and change the voltage too. Now, the last two modules are the roof and the apartment of the owner. It's not much room inside - the advert required quite some space already, but it's cosy :P As you have seen already this apartment get light from the lamp on the table, which is actually part of the Power Functions module. Yes, I know the TV is kind of useless on that wall, but... hey, he wanted a TV so I gave him one :P So, how do you operate this thing? With a KEY :) and last, but not least - two pictures of it with lights on, and ambient lights off: Full gallery is available on my Bicksafe: http://www.bricksafe...ce_Cream_Parlor I hope you enjoyed this little presentation. Please consider support on Ideas: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/106103
  17. muffluvin

    [MOC] City Trolley

    My kid wanted a trolley for his Lego City. I am into 4-studs wide cars and modular mocs, no idea how to begin this en devour. After a few failed attempts, I turned to this section of the forum. I found Solitary Dark's MOC of the San Francisco Trolley. His MOC was the basis for the chassis on this one. This is made out of bricks we have on hand. I plan to make modifications to the cabin, the windows make it look more like a boat than a trolley. My boy's tall order was to motorized the MOC. I manage to squeeze in the Power Functions I.R. into the cabin. The battery pack can also be mounted but it would stick out of the cabin. So I modified this one to run on 9v rechargeable Lithium Ion battery. I stumbled on a number of threads in this section regarding this topic so I went ahead and soldered one end of a PF cable to a connector for a 9v battery I made the thing modular for easy access to the PF components. It also makes changing the appearance of the train easy. Hope you guys like it, like I said, this is my first attempt. Appreciate all the contents in this forum. Here are more pictures: Here's a short video of the Trolley on the move.
  18. I am getting close to the end of this long term build and it's time to share some pictures and a bit of the story. Even before I had finished putting together 10231, I decided I wanted a Crawler to go with it. Being a Technic fan it had to at least drive around and lift the launch platform and shuttle. Those two basic goals spawned a project that has lasted a little over 2 years so far. Some ideas have stuck around since their inception, others were a bit optimistic (like building a peristaltic pump and hoping I could find a way to control the pneumatics hydraulically). February this year marked the 50th anniversary of when the two crawlers went into service, so recently there has been extra motivation to finish. The base equipment; - 16x M-motors (drive) - 4x L-motors (pneumatic jacking and leveling) - 4x IR Receivers (V1 as the V2s do not like driving multiple m-motors on a single channel) - 4x NXT servo motors (steering) - 4x RCX rotation sensors (measuring jacking level between truck and chassis) - 2x NXT bricks (one master and one slave. The master communicates with the Android Tablet and coordinates itself with the slave. Programmed in LeJOS) - 1x PF IR-Link sensor (link between master NXT and all PF motors) - 2x PF Battery boxes (with thermal overload removed) - 1x Android Tablet Future add-ons - Accelerometer (automatically detect the crawler is on a gradient and adjust the leveling to suit) Bricksafe folder is here: http://www.bricksafe.com/pages/OzShan/Crawler Firstly, a couple of my favorite reference pictures; The build itself started with the trucks, thinking that the pneumatics and LAs would dictate the scale. First proof of concept - build a coupling to give height, pitch, roll and yaw to the truck. The pneumatics need to be on their own gimbals too. The reinforced 2x2 rounds slide and rotate in the 4x4 macaroni's. It is on the limit of what will hold together without glue, but it does hold. The two 1x2 technic bricks at the base of the 2x2 column are helped a little by a string (not pictured) which runs up through the 2x2 rounds with the axle. Initial prototype of the drivetrain. I would have liked a higher ratio but there was just no room at this scale. When the gearbox was married with the truck chassis I had to juggle positions, so you will see in later pics the crown gears are facing in not out Best laid plans.... Marry studded and studless they said. It will be easy they said... Showing what will eventually be the steering between chassis and truck. The guide tube and pneumatic cylinders are all on gimbals with the pneumatics coupled together. The average height is preserved during any tilting. With prototypes sorted, it's time to bricklink some parts and quieten down the colour scheme! (thank you 42030 for providing 5L thin liftarms with axle hole in LBG color) You can see the relationship between "guide tube" and cylinders here. The pneumatic system was overhauled too many times to remember but this is what it arrived at. It is all controlled by the direction of the motor. Running forwards drives the pump. When running backwards, the lobes operate the pneumatic valves in series, letting small amounts of air escape each rotation. This lowers the chassis in a slow and controlled manner. The motor can be turned on or off and run in either direction at any time due to the valve timing. Early attempts with PF Servo and NXT servo just couldn't park the valve reliably and after a few operations I would hear a slow leak. I have been trying to keep up with the LDD but it's hard to stay motivated when I know I'm just going to have to suck it up and move over to LDraw if I want to include all the motors, pneumatics and LAs Works so far; (I'll make the files available if anybody would like them). I found LDD essential in the early days to plan ahead and simply find parts, but later on the build overtook it. Original 'box' pump. 1x PF XL motor, 4x 6L pumps running at 90 deg to each other. Very smooth but bulky. Flatter attempt in the same vein. The truck itself. The final design for the height control modules. I hope you enjoy the build so far. More pictures to come of chassis, steering, leveling and interior details. I'll leave it to others to decide what 'theme' it belongs to .
  19. Updating the first post to have all three RC mods in one place. 1st version - Power Functions motors & SBrick control This is a quick and dirty upgrade, it started as a test to see if 2 or 4 L motors can drive the set properly, but things escalated quickly :) The aim was to add the PF components without taking apart the set completely or to change original structure, so obviously there are more elegant ways to hide all the motors and to upgrade the suspension and the drive train. The list of the added elements: 4 PF L motors (drive) 1 PF Servo motor (steering) 3 PF M motors (functions) 1 PF switch 2 8878 Battery boxes 4 PF lights 2 SBricks The 4 L motors can drive the car, but it has no extraordinary performance due to the added weight. The servo motor is struggling sometimes (especially when the car is not moving), it'd need another servo motor or some other solution for the steering to work smoothly. 2nd version - pickup-style body, 4 buggy motors, 2 BuWizz units After the first attempt I wanted to build something faster, so I had to reduce weight and add more power :) The back part of the truck was removed, I removed also a lot of non vital elements (like the fake V8). 4 Buggy motors were added and they were powered by 2 BuWizz units. The results was pretty fast considering the tracks and could handle the obstacles well. 3rd version - tracks removed, wheels added, pickup-style body, 4 buggy motors, 2 BuWizz units This is my third and last Lego 42069 Extreme Adventure remote control mod. After the previous version I did not plan to create another one but I was convinced by some comments on my YouTube channel (thanks for the tip!). Although I really liked 42069 on tracks, I realized that the top speed was limited by the construction so the 4 buggy motors could not show their full potential. I removed the tracks and added the wheels from the 9398 Crawler set. The pickup-style body was kept from the previous mod to ensure the car is as light as possible. The axles were rebuilt completely to fit the buggy motors and the wheels. The car is driven by 4 buggy motors and there's a PF Servo for steering. It is controlled and powered by 2 BuWizz units. It became surprisingly fast, I was curious so I added a small GPS tracker to measure the top speed - you can check the result in the video :)
  20. ZCerberus

    [MOC] LL928 M.C.V.P Maverick

    The legendary durability of the 928 M.C.V.P created a storage and personnel problem for OrionBlu as replacement parts already in production vastly outpaced the need. The stockpile of parts meant there was no room for replacement or production parts for other new vehicles or spacecraft. OrionBlu decided to use the overrun of replacement parts to build additional M.C.V.Ps, but with a standard crew of 4, the new M.C.V.P would need to wait months to recruit and train new crew. In order to counteract these issues, OrionBlu redesigned the crew compartment of the Maverick to house only a single pilot with the additional space converted to house an enhanced shield generator and two Omega class super computers used to automate the functions of the other crew members of the M.C.V.P. This single crew version of the M.C.V.P was officially called the Mono Mega Core Vehicle Platform, of M.M.C.V.P, but the official name was not favored by field personnel who dubbed the vehicle the "Maverick". ================================================== The Maverick is slightly bigger than the M.C.V.P "Classic"- with the Maverick is on the bottom. The Maverick also has a full suite of lights! This build also has power functions and complete SBrick remote control! Check out the video of the Maverick in action!
  21. Greetings, Train Tech! Here's a model of the BR24 steam locomotive from Germany, built at my usual 15 inches / stud scale: The BR24 (or "DRG Class 24") were a standard class of German locomotives built in the 1920s and 1930s. As was the case with most standard German designs, plans were drawn up and orders were placed from various manufacturers. They served through World War 2, and continued to serve into the 70s in West Germany, East Germany, and in Poland (as the Oi2 class) Most photos of the locomotives show them fitted with the larger Wagner smoke deflectors (the "elephant ears") -- I've chosen to model the locomotive with the smaller Witte deflectors, which were fitted on a few examples later in their life. I was motivated to build this locomotive for two reasons. First, I wanted a suitable locomotive to go with the Umbauwagen I had built. Secondly, I hadn't seen many new takes on this model since Ben Beneke's version from the early 2000s! There are many builders who have modified Ben's design, often substituting BBB medium wheels for the rare large wheels from the set 7750. However, my typical scale is larger than the scale of Ben's model, and I also wanted to leverage some new parts that have come out since. Like most of my locomotives, this model features Power Functions. A single M-motor beneath the cab powers the drivers at a 5:3 reduction ratio. The locomotive is fairly light but pulls adequately, and there's room in the boiler for additional weight if needed. In a way, this model helps to understand and demonstrate how little weight and torque you can get away with; I see a lot of builders cram extra motors into their locomotive, when the torque can't be transmitted due to a lack of weight. The tender houses the Power Functions receiver and battery box. The 3-axle tender has a rigid frame, with the center axle sliding to negotiate curves (I used a similar geometry on the TP56 locomotive). The body of the tender lifts off for access. The battery box is mounted sideways to better take advantage of the shape of the tender. Coupled together, the locomotive has decent reception from all angles except the front, where the cab blocks the receiver. Incidentally, my model of the 2MT, which exhibited similar reception characteristics, happened to fall off the table during prototyping of this model. About 60% of the 2MT's parts wound up in the BR24, which is actually a pretty good recycling rate! I took the model to Bricks By The Bay 2017, where it spent many hours pulling the Umbauwagen around BayLUG's display. It also won "Best Machine" in the "Scale Models" category: Thanks to anyone who came by to see it, and the rest of the display! Here's the full Brickshelf gallery, along with some Work-In-Progress pictures. I've also brought you some footage of the locomotive in action: Thank you for reading! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- One final note: Ben was one of the builders who had been active around the time I first started buidling Lego train MOCs -- so in a way, this model is an homage to him. A few of the design techniques used in this model are based on techniques in his models -- the hinges angling the sides of the cab, the 11-plate-diameter boiler, and the way the smoke deflectors are attached. If you're still out there in the hobby, Ben, thank you for inspiring me and a whole generation of builders.
  22. Hi! Two years ago, I did a motorizable cherry picker for a contest on the french forum TechLUG. So, I used the comments I had, and I decided to : - Use a more little scale - Better proportions - I did a better cab. In the first MOC, it was too heavy because of the battery box inside it. - The first cherry picker was motorizable by a M motor ; this one is only motorized, more simple and efficient. To summararise : Better proportions (I hope ^^) Only motorized I use inverted gearboxes for : - Outriggers - Arm - Turn table And the manual functions : - The steering (of course) - Extension of the arm So, here's the result: The simplest function is the steering. But there is the L motor over it. So, I used three 16t gears to turn the wheels directly by their axle of rotation. And now, the gearbox. It's an inverted gearbox : the "out gears" turn in the opposite sense. So, when you invert the position of the driving ring, you invert the rotation of a function. Here are screenshots: The outriggers can up the truck: the wheels don't touch the floor. To finish, the arm. It has a triple deformable quadrilateral. I needed so much time to do it, but it's nice to see in action. And the video :
  23. Hello everybody and let me present my version of a modified 42005 Monster Truck. It was my second set after my "dark age", that I've bought many years ago, after 42029 as supplementary set with a lot of useful pieces and planned to use for a live axle suspension and some other features for 42029 model. However, I liked the set as a simple and functional model and re-assembled it several times. Here is the model and later I'll provide the all details: A month ago, when I tired of infinite attempts to turn 41999 into a Muscle Car (the chassis isn't rigid enough, but I already did a great progress and hopefully will share it once) I returned to this model and set the task to motorize it adding 4WD, but keeping 4 wheels steering and current suspension (keep the original construction as possible as I can). First, I've analyzed the all existing attempts that I could find over EB, Rebrickable and YouTube and it happens that there were several MODs by different authors: First of all, it's @Splat’s MOD with all steered and driven axles (see topic here). I see no reason to duplicate its description, so let me just note that he saved the necessary features with adding Servo + L-Motor mounted under the hood and trunk. The chassis configuration is 4x4/4 or 4WD-4WS. It’s the best motorized model, I think, because of amazing simplicity and performance, but unfortunately it has a kind of “articulated” steering that isn't real, so was trying to made a "real" 4WD-4WS version, using this model as reference. Another one is Jan Dvorak’s (is he on EB?) MOD with all original features supplemented by on-axle L-Motor that drives the rear wheels and Servo for the 4WS. He added an additional 5X7 frame with differential that provided a necessary rigidness. The chassis configuration is 4x2/4 or RWD-4WS. Personally I don't like such a long axle sub-frame. However I've found a good idea of vertical gears inside the central shaft. The third one is @codefox421's MOD, inspired by Splat’s version, with the original front axle and non-steered custom rear axle with on-axle L-Motor. His custom rear axle, based on two portal hubs, is a quite compact and simple, but has no steering. The chassis configuration is 4x2/2 or RWD-FWS. It looks trial-ready with the portal hubs, but it's nearly impossible to add the steering here, so I got nothing from this model. An unusual @Tommy Styrvoky's MOD with an interesting feature: he modified the front axle, not the rear one, by adding a solid drivetrain with worm gear and on-axle M-Motor, so result is a front-wheels driven Monster Truck with oversized fake engine. The chassis configuration is 4x2/4 or FWD-4WS. Very aggressive! WRRRRR Daniel Wirasantosa’s (is he on EB?) MOD that differs from the previous ones by using of chassis-mounted L-Motor that drives the rear axle (that has a bit low ground clearance due to the 5x7 frame) and, moreover, he used a custom steering shaft that comes directly to the steering rack. The chassis configuration is 4x2/2 or RWD-FWS. Starting this version, I got a more or less defined plan: 4WD with off-axle (chassis-mounted) L-Motor that drives the both axles through the existing “drivetrain” (former steering shaft) and the off-axle Servo that steers the both axles through the custom steering shaft above the driveshaft. There were two more versions: Michael M’s stretched one and LEGOTechnic360’s solid-chassis version with no suspension, but they didn't help me with any new ideas. Nothing personal, guys, if you're reading it, I just had a full and consistent vision of my further MOD: Hull - the original with no changes. Axles geometry - original. I tried to save the all things like the wheels location, suspension mounting points, ground clearance, steering angles (that are even bigger a bit now)… And I still can't believe that made it, after a thousand tries! Suspension - original, with no changes. However I put the hard shock absorbers in the rear end, as the default ones were too weak to keep the BuWizz battery. Wheels - original. I decided to keep the original wheels and tires with no giant crawler ones or even Claas, that are too big even for a Monster Truck. Frame - mostly original, but possibly modified since it will have an L-Motor and Servo mounted above the axles (right under the cargo platform and hood). Drivetrain - it must be the ex-steering shaft that comes through the cardans inside the "big" ball joints to the both axles, connected to the L-Motor via the set of normal and clutch gears. Steering - for the all wheels, like in the original model, but the steering shaft comes above the drive shaft, in parallel with it and can slide a bit while the suspension moves. Enough the words...The most interesting part starts here. Following my plan, the bigger challenge was to modify the original axles - I tried several options, even trial-like with solid axles, but 4WS provides an amazing maneuverability due to big steering angles, so axle diffs are likely vital for such model (solid axles were making a permanent clicking noise in the transmission even with motor stalling sometimes) and I decided to make a fast Monster truck, not a slow crawler with a high torque. The drive train. There you can see how I did it: L-Motor rotates a set of 8T and 16T normal and clutch (required for the steering shaft) gears and then the main horizontal shaft, that were used for steering in the original model. After that the shaft rotates the 12T double bevel gears (ex-pinon gears from the original model), than 20T gears below, single-bevel 20T and the differentials. As result, the gearing ratio is 1:1.667 X 1:1.4 = 1.2334, and provides about ~100 RPM with 15.12 N.cm torque. The wheels connected by a wheel hubs, since I wasn't able to use the universal and CV joints with affordable steering angles, wheels position (I kept exactly the same position as in 42005) and rigidness. The steering. Here you can see the servo (mounted upside down in order to provide more space for the battery block above, steering shaft that goes above the driveshaft, 12T gears (pinions) and 13L racks joined to the wheel hubs. In order to allow the suspension travel, the gears has 1/2L offset from the racks and slides together with the shafts along the mounting points when the suspension compresses. It's a fully legal, but still allowed in LDD and works like a charm! The only mistake that the hubs must be from Claas, but they aren't presented in LDD unfortunately: Just to explain why I used the clutch gears (but with no gearbox actually, ha-ha ), the drive and steering systems intersects so hard, so followed TLG way and used the same solution that they did in the official models (42029, for example) - passed the one through the other. Green is a drive subsystem, blue - steering. The Axles. Here you can see how the steering shaft slides by 0.5L (notice the gap between the 12T black gear and LBG liftarm) - it provides about 1L suspension travel for the both axles. Other images, the story of a modified hull (by Phil), LDD file and instruction in PDF are coming soon...
  24. Good grief, this thing has been sitting on my desk for over a year now, and I just now got around to taking pictures of it. tsk tsk. Anyway, this is a failed attempt at making a ring crane using a hailfire droid wheel as a base. It is loosely based upon a Sarens SGC-120, and uses a 3 way reversable distribution gearbox, much like 42042. Each selector controls one function, forward and reverse. The crane features 3 winches, controlling the boom luffing, the luffing jib, and the hook. The winches are run by one M motor. The counterweight is 5 PF AA battery boxes, plus some old train weights, and some ball bearings. Now, I mentioned that this is a failed attempt, and there are a good number of reasons for that. Firstly, the gearbox connecting the M motor to the distribution box was very weak and overly complex. Then, this model had several critical structural flaws. The main boom wasn't nearly stiff enough, and would warp with the slighted provocation. The individual sections were strong enough, but the connections to get them in a triangular shape were not. Then, the main frame of the crane was very weak, and bent a lot under the weight of the main boom. Same thing goes for the rollers on the base ring. They were not structurally sound at all, and due to that, motorized slewing was not possible. Lastly, the hook was not heavy enough to put tension on the hook line, and so the lines of rope going to the hook would jump at the slightest provocation. Still, even if this did fail, it looked impressive, and I learned from it. IMG_20170813_202442189 by Saberwing007, on Flickr The crane, in all of its glory. Ring Crane 002 by Saberwing007, on Flickr The gearbox. Each selector controls a winch. Ring Crane 003 by Saberwing007, on Flickr The M motor. This was one of the weak points of the model. Not the motor, but the gearbox it is attached to. Ring Crane 004 by Saberwing007, on Flickr The rollers. Not stable enough. Ring Crane 005 by Saberwing007, on Flickr The counterweights. There were two more battery boxes, but they got used for something else. IMG_20170813_202804340 by Saberwing007, on Flickr The crane base, without the booms or counterweight. Ring Crane 007 by Saberwing007, on Flickr The winches. Ring Crane 008 by Saberwing007, on Flickr The frame bending. IMG_20170813_210407144 by Saberwing007, on Flickr The gearbox extracted. Ring Crane 010 by Saberwing007, on Flickr The underside of the gearbox. It's dead simple, aside from the connection to the M motor, which was more complex than it needed to be, and would fail with minimal provocation. Well, that's it. There will be no video, as this got demolished for my TC12 entry. Enjoy, as much as you can enjoy a train wreck like this.