Zerobricks

Planetary hub internals

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8 minutes ago, coinoperator said:

It a functional MODEL.
Not a mud racer like the Outdoor Racer 8675.
You must be really out of your mind to use this set in an outdoor dirt situation.

Oh noes.

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19 minutes ago, coinoperator said:

It a functional MODEL.
Not a mud racer like the Outdoor Racer 8675.
You must be really out of your mind to use this set in an outdoor dirt situation.

FYI I saw your original, unedited post and it's unacceptable. 

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Just now, Zerobricks said:

FYI I saw your original, unedited post and it's unacceptable. 

The guy has 226 posts and zero topics made about hes own mocs.. Troll? 

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1 hour ago, Mechbuilds said:

Troll

Ohhh Mr zero br**s is a god here,
when he does stupid things you accept that

in the main time we might take a look at HIS behaviour.
but again... don't comment gods, it postings that count.

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Hey , its Zero thread and so it is his rules..Guys be nice to him!!!  I felt bad for screwing up his thread last week.. !! 

 

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25 minutes ago, coinoperator said:

I will,
When he apologises for his rude behaviour to every newbie here.

Please point me to the post where I was rude to you or anyone else. 

 

Thank you 

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To anyone here who knows a thing or two about metallic manufacturing (like, actually knows), can you speculate as to why TLC didn’t design metallic hubs?

@coinoperator I agree with you that it’s a bad idea to actually take Lego mud bogging (despite a set being marketed as an off-roader - c’mon guys why would plastic Lego ever be suitable for off-roading) and not expect it to get damaged, but you gotta step back a bit and calm down. It’s just toys man

Edited by Bartybum

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1 hour ago, Bartybum said:

To anyone here who knows a thing or two about metallic manufacturing (like, actually knows), can you speculate as to why TLC didn’t design metallic hubs?

The moving parts need to be able to snap together with rims and be able to be removed from those rims with lowish force. They could use "pressed metal" manufacturing, because it would be cheaper at high volume, but it would cause wear/deformation on the snaps on the part. Also as the part gets used, the snaps would flex and after so many they could break or no be able to spring back. Other metals could be used, but the cost per part would be higher as more labor is used and snaps could still break. 

Then there is the the wear on the plastic as it spins. With out lubrication each part would have to be super smooth. Either way, metal+metal or metal+plastic, one grain of sand and it will be on its way out quicker.

1 hour ago, Bartybum said:

@coinoperator I agree with you that it’s a bad idea to actually take Lego mud bogging (despite a set being marketed as an off-roader - c’mon guys why would plastic Lego ever be suitable for off-roading) and not expect it to get damaged, but you gotta step back a bit and calm down. It’s just toys man

Exactly. They paid for the set/parts and can do as they please. I or others might not like it, but it's not my problem.

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Given how crucial the grease is to the hubs' efficiency, do you guys reckon the hubs have a "shelf life"? I have no idea how this kind of grease behaves - I'm only familiar with bacon grease.

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Drat & bother :wall:

Hopefully, before the old grease dries up someone smarter than me (doesn't take much - I have single-digit IQ) will have figured out how to replace it without wrecking the hubs.

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New parts, same limitations... :hmpf_bad:  However I don't think grease will have any issue - PF ( and older motors) don't tend to need regreasing after years of service. Even so, it is sad to see so much investment produce somewhat underperforming (at least it seems so) products. Or maybe certain lego motors from 2006 are too OP for 2019 new gen stuff :tongue:

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Grease conundrum notwithstanding - and you make a great point about PF motors still working after years of use and abuse, so there's actually hope - I'm pretty happy with the new hubs. As far as I can tell, they're superior in every respect to planetary hubs made using second-gen turntables and 8-tooth gears, with the exception of the mounting points for the steering arms.

They're pretty expensive on B&P now but they're bound to go down soon. The new transmission parts from the Chiron were ridiculously overpriced at first, too.

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@Zerobricks, I just watched your latest video on YT. Considering the number of tests, types of terrain ect in that video. I would consider this one of the first hard tests of these new planetary hubs. One would asume that these types of vehicles, it is best to use 92908c01 which can be easily taken apart for cleaning and lubrication if required. Maybe TLG will take note of this test and do a second version of these new planetary hubs, maybe a better seal around the edges and a screw holding it together so it can be easily taken apart for maintenance. If one can take apart the pneumatics rams to replace the grease, LEGO should be able to come up with a way of being able to service these new hubs.

One thing I would add is that when I built the Morris C8 FAT chassis, I built portal axles and all wheels. When driving over wet muddy terrain, through thick mud holes, or over sand (most notably wet beach sand), one needs to be able to take the axles apart easily and clean any moving part or things can and will get stiffer or jam up really quick.

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1 hour ago, MxWinters said:

One thing I would add is that when I built the Morris C8 FAT chassis, I built portal axles and all wheels. When driving over wet muddy terrain, through thick mud holes, or over sand (most notably wet beach sand), one needs to be able to take the axles apart easily and clean any moving part or things can and will get stiffer or jam up really quick. 

Exactly, all such mechanical pieces should be designed so they can be take apart and maintained. That's the issue with this hub. ATM they are simply disposable if something goes wrong.

Edited by Zerobricks

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1 hour ago, MxWinters said:

[...] Maybe TLG will take note of this test and do a second version of these new planetary hubs, maybe a better seal around the edges and a screw holding it together so it can be easily taken apart for maintenance. If one can take apart the pneumatics rams to replace the grease, LEGO should be able to come up with a way of being able to service these new hubs. [...]

I really hope so. My only concern is that these hubs are specialised parts that only die-hard Technic moccers are ever going to use in any significant numbers, so if there isn't enough demand to warrant a redesign then I guess TLG will leave things as they are.

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I just realized one thing.

If anyone wants to use the hubs along with normal portal ones, you can quite easily match the gearing.

5,4 gearing of the hubs X 1,67 (12:20 tooth gears) = exactly 9, which can easily be achived with a pair of 8:24 tooth gears.

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Working on some vehicle. Did calculation, maybe someone did before, don't know. With new hubs driven by new large motors, with so called Unimog wheels, speed will be close to 1km/h , little bit more.

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IMO there is a point which plainly justify this usage of lego outdoor :

when you want a crawler, a RC car,... ok you have better and sometimes cheaper alternatives.

But if you want your crawler to have operated bucket, or adjustable clearance or such kind of stuff... you have to make it.

And there you have a choice : or you go extrem and buy metallic LA, robotic, etc which is VERY expensive and you will not can make a lot of project ; AND you need room and money for machines which cut aluminium, do scrap etc...

or you use lego which is simple and cheap in comparaison.

Ok, it will not jump to one meter or go to 50 km/h and you will need to replace pieces used by the dust.. but IMO it's the better compromise.

Edited by Bluehose
I did react to a trolling. My bad.

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RC lego outdoors because you can build what ever you want it to be and you can modify it. But on RC, you get the one set you buy and it's pretty much done. Customizing it requires you to fabricate custom parts for each function which costs money and it's a lot harder than just pushing lego bricks together. 

Sure you can't make lego stuff incredibly fast and all that.. But lego will be what you want it to be. If you wanted a firetruck crawler, you can make it out of lego. 
If you want a normal regular RC car to do the same, you'll have to buy custom firetruck shells and modify them to fit a crawler body and make custom wheel hubs and parts to widen the wheels so they fit the firetruck body and it's a massive massive ordeal. 
And when you are bored with it, you're stuck with it forever.. But for lego, you can just disassemble it and make something else. 

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