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Found 1 result

  1. Yet another LEGO TIE Fighter. How far can this classic design be pushed? How many ways are there to build an eye sandwitched by hexagonal solar panels? Is there a perfect design already? This is where beauty of LEGO as form of modelling strikes with full power, as answers to these questions are: Very far, infinite ways, and no, there is no perfect design available and never will be. In 2014 I have built this: It worked, and I think for 2014 and what was available back then, it was pretty good. It had obvious flaw though: no space for a minifigure, and it was also a little too small in scale. I was limited mostly by the fact there were no proper cockpit pieces, and my attempt with literally the only other one was... not spectacular, not to mention it needed painting with A LOT patience required. The new model takes advantage of this cockpit piece, which allowed me to push that original 2014 design further. I know, I am late to the party, years - literally - behind other designers of great TIE models, like Bricks Feeder or Rebel Builder, yet I hope I can bring something new into the T/F building scene. Originally I thought I would just stretch the build here and there but no, heheh, no way. Literally the only unchanged parts are the eight quarter (or one-eighter?) dome pieces, which are to me still the only way to have smooth and roughly spherical design without holes all around. Unfortunately when we look at a closeup of a real movie-filming model of the T/F we see how far are we from true modelling but I say we're collectively inching towards it pretty nicely. I have said this plenty of times but original designers of TIE Fighters really did all they could to make them unbuildable properly, naturally unknowingly - who would think adult guys 30 years in the future would try to recreate the design using perhaps the weirdest medium available?. The T/F is just a sphere, two struts and two flat hexes. Except: 6-diameter central cokcpit piece would require a 9-diameter ball, minifig-scaled TIE would require an 8-diameter ball and don't even get me started on sources for TIEs dimensions. If you think that Illustrated Guide To Star Wars vehicles is helpful, well, not much. I dare to say this book did awfully lot of harm to LEGO Star Wars MOCing scene. So is my TIE perfect? No, not yet. I promise though, I did all I could to make it as good as possible, with no compromises made. And this time it houses a minifig! The design is super sturdy to my standards, nicely swooshable - for a reason, but I will get to that later. Naturally having a T/F built opens a way towards the Interceptor, which for me is among the best looking spaceship designs in any sci-fi. While the core design is similar, the ball has some differences, mostly to accomodate longer struts. This is because LEGO curiously didn't develop 2x9 plates and for once I was in a situation where I can't really replace 2x9 plate with anything without compromising structural integrity. Having that solved I went onto the wing design and OH GOD INTERNET WHAT HAVE YOU DONE. If anyone knows angle on the panels and can prove it, gets a free beer. With shipping. Because the wings are angled in all dimensions, good luck guessing proper values from photos. Because of the IGTSWV book, half of the models (and I don't even mean LEGO models) existing are wrong. And then because of SW animated series, the other half of the models are also wrong... ...so my source of reference was this: Then after having all that done, I experienced another unexpected problem: The ship is top-heavy and won't stand straight. I added tiny legs on the bottom edges of wings which help a bit, and because the design is quite sturdy, the T/I requires no stand. There you have it. Yet another T/F and T/I. I hope you like the designs and I hope I managed to introduce something new to the very competitive scene. Enjoy! ...but wait, there is more! I would not build these models if not a commission request from BrickVault: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrhb3SP2lZBgguLHIWWuHOQ Originally it was meant to be just a few TIE models based on the 2014 design I had, just LDD files, but over time we developed a much more interesting designs and... instructions for each of them! The instructions are paid and please understand, it took weeks to develop them, error-proof, make the experience enjoyable and builds sturdy enough to be handled easily. Normally I do not make instructions, as I prefer to build with real bricks than to do electronic designs. The instructions are designed to have dozens of simple to follow steps with just few pieces per step, have submodels where needed, parts list for each step and a total bill of parts at the beginning. Additionally, in few places, there are notes to watch out for some particular details. I can fully understand now what LEGO designers go through and I can imagine amount of effort required for making instructions for larger and more complicated designs. I am pretty sure it took more time to design instructions for the recent UCS Millennium Falcon than to design the model itself. Thanks for watching and Happy New Year!