Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'rebrick'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Frontpage, Forum Information and General LEGO Discussion
    • Guest Section - PLEASE READ BEFORE YOU REGISTER!
    • Frontpage News
    • Forum Information and Help
    • General LEGO Discussion
    • The Embassy
  • Themes
    • LEGO Licensed
    • LEGO Star Wars
    • LEGO Historic Themes
    • LEGO Action and Adventure Themes
    • LEGO Pirates
    • LEGO Sci-Fi
    • LEGO Town
    • LEGO Train Tech
    • LEGO Technic and Model Team
    • LEGO Mindstorms and Robotics
    • LEGO Scale Modeling
    • LEGO Action Figures
    • Special LEGO Themes
  • Special Interests
    • Minifig Customisation Workshop
    • LEGO Digital Designer and other digital tools
    • Brick Flicks & Comics
    • LEGO Mafia and Role-Play Games
    • LEGO Media and Gaming
  • Eurobricks Community
    • Hello! My name is...
    • LEGO Events and User Groups
    • Buy, Sell, Trade and Finds
    • Community
    • Culture & Multimedia

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


What is favorite LEGO theme? (we need this info to prevent spam)


Which LEGO set did you recently purchase or build?


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Country


Special Tags 1


Special Tags 2


Special Tags 3


Special Tags 4


Special Tags 5


Special Tags 6


Country flag

Found 27 results

  1. Magical. That's what the House of the Five Senses is to me. [MOC] House of the Five Senses by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr The House of the Five Senses is the entrance to the Efteling theme park, which I have the fondest memories of. I still try to trick my parents into taking me there. We never visited Disneyland or even Legoland () even though I'm a big fan. But still, that was never a problem to me because we would often visit the Efteling, which is such a magical, whimsical, fun and genuine place that it totally made up for not visiting those other theme parks. The mere sight of the Efteling's entrance therefore gives me warm feelings. That made it the perfect fit for the latest (and last) contest on Rebrick, "Architecture faves", which called on builders to recreate a place close to their hearts in Architecture style. That and the fact that it's just a super interesting structure to recreate with a fascinating story: [MOC] House of the Five Senses - Everything you need to know by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr Its distinct visual style and defining compound curves made it very challenging to replicate in bricks though, especially at the Architecture scale. My first instinct was to use many bows, cylinders and cones. Turns out that there is a severe lack of cone pieces in reddish brown (and it's only one single set which provides the brown carrots that work perfectly as the peaks...). I had to resort to using slopes and flat parts, and in the end I'm very glad I had to. Using bow pieces would have been a mistake as the main shape of the surface has a concave surface, while the concave bows would have destroyed the flow of that surface. Moreover, it would have been impossible to hide every single half stud lip of a brick or to align everything perfectly, so the angular bricks make those features look more intentional and part of the creation. So strangely, using slopes instead of bows actually results in a visually smoother build and also gives strong, crisp edges where they need to be. [MOC] House of the Five Senses - Dragon Perspective by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr The downside was that I had to create the surface out of a multitude of small pieces at just the right angle instead of using bigger pieces with inherent curvature. That meant I had to find a lot of compact ways to connect things at funny angles and do my best to fill up all gaps. New parts like all the 1x1 pieces with bars in different configurations were absolute life savers to get it to work. Without them, it also wouldn't have been possible to connect the triangular panels that were the only right part for the job in several places. The disadvantage was that all of the complex connections needed a lot of tweaking just to get the part not to collide with others. This being built with Lego Digital Designer, you can understand the struggle of taking half an hour just to line all of the parts up, just to come to the conclusion that it sticks out too much and you have to figure out a completely new solution, or that the collision box of the part is ill defined so it refuses to put the part in place even though there's no collision in real life... Sure, building digitally has a lot of advantages (and no, I didn't use part-colour combos that don't exist as far as I know), but there are some definite disadvantages like spending ages on lining up parts, wishing you could use the illegal connections everybody uses or struggling to understand compled 3D orientations on a screen... Anyway, the small rant being over , believe it or not, in the end I managed to create the building entirely with legal connections as far as LDD is concerned. [MOC] House of the Five Senses - Leaving perspective... by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr In the end, I'm very happy with the final appearance of the building on its own and the fact that it matches the original building quite closely (look here for some excellent reference pictures). I'm especially happy that I took the extra trouble to angle the four peaks of the main part of the building which makes it both accurate and gives it a very dynamic look for a static piece of architecture. To complement the spiky look of the building, I opted for a presentation on an unconventional base placed at a 45 degree angle which emphasized its corners. It has the extra advantage of representing the triangular square (now that's a funny turn of phrase ) in front of the real building, which features a fishbone pattern in the floor which I tried to replicate with the tiles (until I realized I totally missed the point of the pattern, but it still looked good enough ). The very new 2x2 triangular tiles in the end enabled my vision of an angled base, but sadly I had to use some loose parts to fill in some funny gaps. Still, I think it was totally worth it for the presentation. Finally, it was very fun to add all of the little elements like the trees, hedges, lightposts and flowers that breathe some life and colour into the scene like the seasoning in a dish. [MOC] House of the Five Senses - Group perspective by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr In the end, I'm very happy with the visual result. Also with the fact that I pushed myself to tackle such a challenging topic and persisted through the entire building process which took an entire month even though the model only counts eight to nine hundred pieces (I often went days with only placing ten bricks or something like that...), because through it I learned some new techniques and part combinations (triangular flag element + 1x1 round place with bar at the bottom = total win!) which will certainly be handy in the future. And what made it truly special was the feedback I got. I has already been very fun to see Efteling fans react to my model. And I am very grateful that the judges of the Rebrick competition liked it enough to designate me as a runner up winner... The House of the Five Senses certainly has worked his magic on me once more! If it only puts a little bit more magic on your day as well, that'd be just perfect. So I hope you enjoy it, and don't forget to keep your eyes open to see magical things! ____________ So, I mentioned this was built with LDD, which means that I can also easily share the file with you, just in case you're interested in the techniques or would like to try to build your own. As I said, all the parts (at least the most important ones I checked) are available in the colours I used, and everything is connected, although I don't promise it will be a creation you can swoosh around - if that is something you'd want to do with a building. However, the design presented in the renders isn't horribly practical. The base, for example, would take in more depth than needed on a shelf, limiting the display options. The angled base also requires some loose parts and the new 2x2 triangular tile in grey, which have only appeared in the roller coaster set so are on the rare side. That's why I've also designed a version with a rectangular base, which should be a lot easier to build and manage in real life. It doesn't have the tirangular square in front, but it does have more vegetation in a corner. I also got rid of the loose white jumper plates at the base of the back tower. I couldn't find a solution during the time frame of the contest, but after a lot of thinking I've now designed an alternative with car doors which are all firmly attached. Both versions of the model are included in the file below, so you can check out the one that suits you best. Have fun with it, and if somebody does succeed in building it in real life, be sure to send me a picture, and don't hesitate to ask questions because I still have some designer notes! The LDD file: https://bricksafe.com/files/BEAVeR/digital-models/efteling_buildable.lxf
  2. badgerboy

    LEGO ReBrick Contests

    I couldn't find a dedicated thread, so please feel free to move this comment to the appropriate thread if I have failed in my extensive search to find the correct thread to post this in. If there isn't one, may I suggest this as a general but official LEGO contests thread? Therefore, please feel free to add an appropriate pinned comment regarding this topic's remit... certainly something better worded anyway. To my issue/point/problem... I have been trying to upload an entry to one of LEGO ReBrick's contests all day. I've tried on my iPad and my old Kindle Fire. My four image files are easily below the largest file threshold, in fact, the combined size of my four images is below 2Mb. I'm adding only three tags as outlined and have tried with and without spaces after the commas. Each time I manage to press submit after the preview I get the error message that "oops!" I need to check my file sizes or my tags. Has anyone else experienced similar problems or have any advice? I've alerted the admin in a comment that will get moderated in 1-2 working days but I'm feeling a bit impatient and wondered if anyone else was experiencing difficulties and therefore confirming the problem being LEGO's website and not my hardware.
  3. Damiano Anger

    31065 Lighthouse (alternate)

    Hello, this is my second alternative set for the 31065 townhouse. It's a lighthouse Enjoy and comment! https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-15030/Damiano_Anger/31065-lighthouse/#comments https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-15030/Damiano_Anger/31065-lighthouse/#bi
  4. Hi all I have recently won runner-up in Rebrick's LEGO Batman Returns to the Justice League contest and wanted to share the entry with you! In this contest, you had to create a comic strip no longer than five panels showing how Batman might return to the Justice League after the events of The LEGO Batman Movie. It sounded like fun, so I entered! I used LEGO Digital Designer and Bluerender to create the background of the Fortress of Solitude and photographed real minifigures, cut them out, and placed them over it. I tried to make their poses as expressive as I could, so I popped arms and legs out to achieve poses minifigures cannot usually make, just as is done in the LEGO films. I also erased parts of their faces while editing and gave them custom expressions, and added a slight blue glow to Batman's eyes. Also, the lines coming out from behind Batman in the third panel were photographed "antenna" pieces. I'm really happy to have been selected as a winner of the contest, and I hope you enjoy the comic! Thank you!
  5. Hi everyone! As some of you might have seen on Flickr or Rebrick, I am participating in the Freighter Wars-Contest on Rebrick. For this I created the Corellian Senator's ship and gave it the name Corellian Eclipse. Don't ask me how that name makes any sense, it just sounded cool! :P After all, does Millennium Falcon really make sense? :D I was inspired to build this by the book The Millennium Falcon Owner's Workshop Manual: Star Wars (Haynes Manuals) and various ideas I found on the allmighty internet. I'd also like to thank my buddy Inthert for allowing me to use some elements of his Millennium Falcon and credit goes to him for the visualisation of the models interior rooms. Now, on to the build itself! As the title suggests the Corellian Eclipse is basically the armoured variant of the YT-1300 with a more enclosed central cockpit, more conventional (and reliable) hyperdrive engines and a much more sealed hull. This, in my eyes, was the perfect basis for a luxury spaceship, so instead of the usual freighter-interior, I equipped the ship with a much more elegant and luxurios interior, worthy of a Republic Senator. And to show it's status of diplomatic immunity in the galaxy I added some red markings, ever so slightly reminiscent of the Senate's seal. I think the pictures can speak for themselves from here on. If you have any questions though, feel free to ask them in the comments section and I'll be sure to come back to you! I'd love to hear what you think of the model and the overall idea of the ship itself. Constructive criticism is of course also very welcome! Cheers, Kit
  6. Hi This is my entry for the Freighter Wars Contest . When it was announced, I seem an opportunity to build not your regular Technic model and I really enjoyed the experience This model is based on the YT-2400 Outrider,. As you may see, it has some modifications as the color scheme, canons instead turrets and a longer rear of the cockpit (I don't know how it is called) My main goal was built it with only existent Technic parts and make all details with Technic pieces, avoiding System parts as possible. In the end I used a LA, perpendicular connectors, towballs, axles, busshes etc for the details and only 5 tiles and 3 dishes. Also I wanted to create the body an getting the shape using Panels as much as I could to give an uniform, sleek appearance. (The new 3x13 curved panel in black was really useful) Since there is not a room and time due contest for functions, the only one is function is rotating canons using the central vent of the rear as knob. The model was partially built in real life, but I ran out of pieces because it was a side project. Also the color combination was really bad (White and bright green) So decided to finish it on LDD - despite all difficulties of building with Technic on LDD - and then this color combination comes that really pops out and is possible to build in real life. Unfortunately, right know is not possible for my to build it, since a lack so many black panels..... Someday... For now there are some pics/renders . Hope you like it
  7. BEAVeR

    [MOC] Temse Skyline

    It wasn't until I went to university and only came home in the weekends, I realized how much I love the sight of my hometown of Temse in Belgium. I always try to have a seat to the left of the train, near a big window, especially near sunset. Because when my train crosses the Temse Bridge over the Schelde river, the view is just magnificent and then I know I'm home. [MOC] Temse Skyline by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr You can imagine that on reading the assignment of Rebrick's "Dream Skylines" competition, "Build a Skyline of somewhere close to your heart", I didn't hesitate for a moment on what to build. But I think that choice might have been the only easy part about this contest! Since the creation has to be in the style of the existing LEGO Architecture skylines, I had to come up with several ways to add enough detail and texture at the small scale, and at the same time had to adhere to the maximum size requirements that didn't allow for any overhang. Personally, I also wanted to create something that's completely buildable in real life with solid connections and only existing part/color combinations - because who knows, maybe one day my town will be interested to have one of these for real? - which caused me a lot of headaches. All of that made for a build time of nearly a month for this seemingly small creation (that still contains close to 800 bricks). After all that building, I managed to cram in most (though not everything) of what I wanted to represent. From left to right, you have the Boelwerf Crane, the Onze Lieve Vrouwe Church, the Old Town Hall and the Temse Bridge. If you're interested in more information about those individual buildings, just keep reading! [MOC] Temse Skyline - Onze Lieve Vrouwe Church by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr The Onze Lieve Vrouwe Church is the defining building of the Temse skyline, and rightfully so. The original dates back to the 770's, erected by the holy Amelberga, the patron saint of the parish. It is believed that she fled her suitor, a powerful man, because she wanted to dedicate her life to God. And when she was cut of by the Schelde river, a giant sturgeon appeared from the water to lead her safely to the other side, where she erected the church out of gratitude. To this day, we have a yearly procession to celebrate her. Of course the church was rebuilt several times, and I depicted it as it appears today,the way I know her inside and out because this is the building where I go to mass and have gotten to know a lot of wonderful people. I love this building so much that I actually tried to build it several times before this contest. However, i always got stuck on the iconic but hard to capture shape of the clocktower. However, having to work at this small scale forced a certain size of the tower on me, which enabled me to have a more focused problem. When eventually I found out that the classic medieval helmet worked perfectly to capture the bell shape of the bottom part of the roof, and that's what really kicked of this entire creation. Since I couldn't connect anything to the helmet, I had to work with an external support, but luckily it doesn't get in the way of appreciating the creation too much. I also had a lot of variations for the rest of the tower, but in the end this version with the notches nicely corresponding to features on the actual building made it, also thanks to the input of my family on this issue! From there on, it was mostly a lot of complicated SNOT work to let the windows and the buttresses work, but it gave a nicely textured result. To top it all of, I included the statue of the Blessed Priest Poppe, who is also a central figure in our community. [MOC] Temse Skyline - Old Town Hall by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr Up until a couple of years ago, this was the administrative heart of Temse, but now everything apart from some ceremonies has moved to the new administrative center in a modern building for which I didn't have enough space to include... Still, it's a beautiful building from the beginning of the twentieth century that actually stands on the place where once the home of my ancestors stood. One of the ceremonies being held here, is the memorial of two of my ancestors, who became famous after allegedly dying in each other's arms during the first World War, becoming a symbol for love between brothers. This year, it was exactly 100 years ago that happened, so there was a ceremony on this very fitting location, where my sister and I also read some poems one of the two brothers wrote. Truly a special experience! Building this also was a special experience if you can call it like that, because of all of the tricky SNOT fitted into a really tiny package. I'm really happy with how the roof turned out. And while it's a pity that the spires of the main tower have to be held in place by a rubber band, at least the official LEGO rubber band with the right size had the right color as well. [MOC] Temse Skyline - Boelwerf Crane by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr I was born just half a year too late... If I would have been born sooner, I would have seen the Boelwerf working with my own eyes. It was a big shipyard along the Schelde river just outside of the town which was the economic heart of Temse for quite some time, with the biggest ship of the world at that time being build there. My grandfather was one of the employees there working among the docks, the cranes, the machine shops... Whenever I see pictures of those periods, I begin drooling and dreaming about that time that I sadly never knew. Because right now, where once the Boelwerf was, now a lot of new apartment buildings, houses, shops like my hairdresser and the new administrative building stand. The only thing that remembers the glory days is a beautiful and huge crane that never actually belonged to the Boelwerf but became an essential part of our skyline, and a couple of poles in the water and a hidden dry dock. Building this one actually went surprisingly easy when compared to the previous two buildings, and I'm pretty satisfied with how I managed to maintain the spindly look of the construction and the realistic angles of the supports, realized by putting technic pints over minifig antennas. The difficult part about this build actually was keeping it within the prescribed size limits of the build without overhang. That's why I had to sacrifice one of the three wrenches in the back, but luckily it isn't as noticeable. And nice to know: the crane can actually swivel around! [MOC] Temse Skyline - Back of the Box by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr I really had a lot of fun making the renders for this creation, trying to match the box art from the official skyline sets as well as possible, and I'm very happy with the results that accomplish my goal. Just ask if you want to know more about the rendering process. This is also a place to discuss the final building: the Temse Bridge on the far right. Although it doesn't look like it from the build, this was with its 365 meter for a long time the longest bridge over water in Belgium, and also one of the prettiest, in my opinion! The original actually was designed by Gustave Eiffel (yes, thát Eiffel!), but that one was deliberately blown up during the second World War. In 2009, a second bridge next to it opened to allow for more traffic to pass because it was getting a bit problematic. That bridge is actually nine meters longer than the original one, so in Temse we have just one, but the two longest bridges over water in Belgium! Giving the bridge the skeletal look was impossible to do on this scale, but the bottom of the plates actually still gives a nice texture to it. I couldn't make it as long as I wanted, and I had to place it at an angle, just to stay within the size requirements, so in reality it is of course way longer. Also, the 2009 bridge didn't fit on even though I created a model for it. But then again, that bridge pales in comparison to the older one. In the end, I'm very pleased with the result, so it was worth all of the work. It gives me the same feeling as when I see the real skyline from the train on a Friday evening, the feeling of coming home. Which is really nice that I'm on a two month internship in South-Korea! Thanks for looking, and I hope you enjoy your home as much as I do! _________________ The digital file (LDD)
  8. With Canada fast approaching I decided to pay homage to Canada's Capital by designing an Architecture Skyline style of Ottawa. This model features Parliament Hill, The National Gallery of Canada (with Maman), and a tiny local bus to top it off! Designed in LDD and rendered with Bluerender. Thanks for checking it out! And if you'd like to see more MOCs in the future be sure to follow me on various social media: -ARTOBRIX http://www.instagram.com/artobrix http://www.twitter.com/artobrix http://www.youtube.com/c/artobrix
  9. Posted to rebrick.com, so also details here Final model Details in 4th reply Finally decided what to build for lego official contest. It will be distance counter - automatic, as it is about some automation. Started with 3 level counter - cm, dm and m. First level is continious, other to discret with 10 steps.
  10. Zerobricks

    BMW U2-P1A

    I wanted to build something special for the rebrick LEGO Technic BMW motorcycle competition. The first idea I got was to try to make hubless wheels. After trying several wheel sizes approaches and techniques I decided to use the old 8880 soft tyres with a combiantion of 8 135 degree connectors and a nunch of smaller internal wheels: In order to make the bike look low and sleek I decided to ditch the normal handlebar steering system for a multi-link one, which gave the bike its distinctive front shape: Belly photo of the multilink steering system - notice the two 6L steering links which allow for suspension movement: Of course a bike like this also needs suspension which is hidden in the frame: And finally the bike was covered finished in blue trim, with BMW color detail in the front: And of course I just had to include the special 3L beam found in this year's sets: And here's a video to finish it all up: In the end of the day I am very proud of myself for building something out of the box, I learned how to make smoothly rotating hubless wheels and I managed to build something trully futuristic with all the weird angles, shapes and functions. If anyone is interested in rebuilding this beauty, there is also an LXF file of the model without the tyres here: BMW U2-P1A
  11. Hello everybody! After several discussion about photos, permissions, I have all the material about the trip to Stuttgart, which was part of the grand prize in the Rebrick "Build your dream Porsche" competition last year (summer). We started to organize the trip from 19th of august in email with TLC's online community specialts, and after a few weeks we fixed the date of the tour: 5-6th of October. To be honest, because of the so many awesome entries, I don't really believed that my entry will became first, so when the email arrived with the possibility to visit the Porsche Museum in Germany, my thoughts were only about this for a few hours, I was really exicted how it will be organized, about the details. I'd like to say a big thank you for both Lego's and Porsche's team, all of them did a really good job in organizing. We had everything in the right time, nothing had to be paid (except some meals), and every of my wishes were fulfilled, like making photos together with the original car, as you will see below. I know, I said, this report will come earlier, even I expected to have the photos (we had an official photographer) much earlier, but it's a longer process to be complete all the work on them, and the Porsche team had to discuss which ones are allowed to publish, etc. So, now I have everything important, and finally some time to write. Let's see what happened, in chronologichal order. (be patient while the pictures are loading, this topic contains nearly 150 of them, and this is the reduced selection ) Gallery with all the photos: http://bricksafe.com/pages/Tamas_Juhasz/lego-technic-porsche-contest-first-prize-trip-to-stuttgart-germany As they said, my model is allowed to take some photos with Porsche cars in the Museum, I packed it safely to avoid damage during the ~960 km of travel: The trip was 4 days long: 4,5,6,7th of october. 4th is day one. Since we were allowed to travel by car (fuel and additional cost were paid), this day was all about the journey to Stuttgart. Long motorway stages, all the usual, but it wasn't so boring. I was in Stuttgart before, me and my father visited the Mercedes-Benz Museum, and he was several times there in the last few decades. We did it the same way, two of us went to this trip. All in all, the route was familiar, and comfortable with car. We saw the table of Lego Land, Günzburg was close to the route. We arriwed about 20:00. This was our Hotel room, we had to choose from 3 five stars hotels, Meridian became the winner with it's great parking house. The room was beside of a big route, but the sealing in the windows were so good that in closed state the room is perfectly quiet. The main day with all the attractions, including Porsche Drive, Museum tour, and exclusive dinner at evening (in the Museum, Christophorus Restaurant). At morning, there was a huge traffic jam, but we arrived in time, and everything happaned, as planned, we met our contacts. The garage was a Museum inside of the Museum, too, with most of the cars from "Porsche Drive": This is the first you see when entering into the Museum: First program was the Porsche Drive, which was a surprise, in the contest description there was nothing about it. They give us a 2016 graphit grey Porsche 911 Carrera S Cabriolet, with about 420 HP, convertable top. Due to traffic situations, we couldn't reach it's top speed , but you can feel it's power even at around 200 km/h. (that stage had no limits in the german motorway) There were routes to choose, we went through the one with a beautiful castle, this contained nearly all the types of tarmac, curves, hills, slopes, so it was a pleasure to drive on. We were courious about the engine (but as both of us are automotive engineers we were prepared to see nearly nothing), but because of the top mechanism, you can see practically only the fans. Interesting that you can see the rear wheels outer side from your seat: This is the maximum, you can see from the engine (from above, of course): Back to Museum, around 13:30. In Zuffenhausen (part of Stuttgart, where the company is located) every second car is a Porsche, you can see many of them (not a surprise): This was added with the car: Fees and terms, if somebody is interested: I was very happy to take apart in a so exclusive tour, Mr. Dieter Landenberger, the director of the Museum and Porsche Historical Archives was our guide, he talked about many interesting facts about lot of extraordinary types, I have to mention the 909 Bergspyder, which was as light as possible (384 kg!!). The following ~ 20 photos were taken by the photographer, I'd like to say a big thank you for him (Pascal Malamas). The special exhibition was about the transaxle era, so we found a 944 Turbo Cup with the same color scheme, as my 962C model: And now, my favorite photo so far, in the Museum's workshop. From left to right: one of the original mechanics of Porsche 962C, Mr. Landenberger, my Father, me, our contact form TLC, and two colleagues from brand entertainment of Porsche. I really like this photos, as it contains every important people and things. Some more from Workshop: Then we want on foot a bit further, in a centre, where the (nearly) 1:1 scale Porsche 911 GT3 RS is located. From now, I had in hand my model, so we could took photos with it everwhere: Back to Museum again, they did an interview with me (even I waiting infos, news about it), and during that the rest of the team made some more photos together with the model and original cars: Finally, the original and my version together: (ok, it's a 956, but that was the closest to 962C) : ) Dinner at the evening, with some exclusive food. Since my model was with me, it landed on the table. Some interest appeared from other guests, they saw it couriously: Through the glass wand, you can see the Museum, some real cars: SIght from the top of the Museum was really nice, especially at evening: At the third day, we went back to the Museum, to see everthing in detail, and to take some good photos. I made more than 600 of them, to get material for my future Porsche plans, the Museum is very good for it. They even have blueprints for some types in tablets in front of them. Some of the more interesting photos: This Beetle looked fantastic, it was really in top condition, this photo was a must have: Since my father's hobby is collecting automodels, we brought there a 1:43 model about Porsche 356 Nr.1 roadster: (Nr1 typ is one of my favourites, that was my second plan for the Porsche competition, awesome car in every meaning) I tried to take photos about the types, which were in the Lego contest, like 919, 714, 904, tractor, and 804: Interesting: I found material about my model many times, first here: At the speed of 321,4 km/h the 956 shouldn't fall down from the roof: I like this exhaust pipe: Long and racing version from the 928, both are very rare: Some of the prizes, Porsche had won during the times, in the background the flag was in movie "Le Mans" (Steve McQueen) GT1 street version: We saw large scale models, too: The magic wall, it hides everything, except there, where you are in front of it: 918 Hybrid: 718: It has a really nice shop, with lot of model cars, we bought some, too (see below): Finally a Lego thing: Here was the red-yellow racer, too: The GT3RS 42056 set wasn't available in the store, but we found the real in the garage, aming "driveable" cars: In day 3, we also visited the Factory, we saw the making of nearly all types of current Porsches, but I can't provide any photos, since - of course - there wasn't allowed to take them. The Museum isn't the only option for car lovers, you can see nearly every type of Porsches in the streets around Stuttgart, too. if you are lucky enough: At day 4 we travelled back to Hungary, during we saw Legoland a bit (really just a bit, from the car ): From the Museum's shop: Small card collection of famous Porsches: At the middle of day 2, we received a kind gift from entertaining team, a nice book about 2015's motorsport happenings, with Le mans in focus. Big thanks to Porsche for it! Do you know, what it is?: Back to Lego, there are some pages in this book: At 21.12.2016 we received a big misterious box, from Porsche. I couldn't even imagine, what's inside, since all of my prizes arrived, the certificate too, many months earlier. I thought, it's something about the Museum trip, because it arrived after that. But 2 months later. We opened the box couriously, and it's content revealed (everything were packed with lot of care): It's a "simple" picture for hanging to wall, but made partly from metal sheets, really inetersting, and sturdy. Can you tell me, exactly which technique is this?: It's something that fits for a car company. I hope you enjoyed reading this report, I tried my best in text and photos, it's really hard to select only about 100 from all of those, I took, and got. Any questions, comments are appreciated, as always. The interview should be publicized soon, I'll link here, as it appears, or when I'm informed about it. It seems to be, I'll have more time for Lego, forums from now, this report is some kind of being back.
  12. LittleJohn

    [MOC] LEGO Life

    An entry for the LEGO Life logo contest on Rebrick. Under each ‘stud’ on the brick, there is an 8×8 minifig scale vignette, in the same theme as the microscale build above it. I tried to represent three of the core themes of LEGO: City, Space, and Castle. This was a very enjoyable build, as I got to dabble in several themes, but it still all came together fairly quickly and easily. Lots more pictures on Brickbuilt Thanks for looking, C&C welcome
  13. I made these for the Rebrick contest for the 10th anniversary of modular buildings. The task was an interior vignette up to 16x16 studs in size which would thematically fit in any of the modular buildings. I tried to refrain as much as possible from using many ready-made items and accessories. Hotel Lobby for the Cafe Corner Baby room for Pet Shop (the building, not the store, lol)
  14. Imagine you walk in a gorge with steep cliffs of orangy rock towering above you. You can't see that far ahead of you, until suddenly the gorge widens and you're bemused by a cliff that looks a bit different. It's the same rock as everywhere else, but it is smooth, shaped into a beautiful composition of columns, frontons, statues. Petra is an amazing place. I have yet to see it with my own eyes, but just reading about fills you with wonder. Even a walk on Street View is an awesome experience. It's no wonder that Petra belongs to the seven modern wonders of the world. It houses many extraordinary buildings dating back almost two millennia ago. The most famous and one of the best conserved of all of these buildings is Al-Khazneh, the Treasury. It's monumental yet elegant, beautifully refined between the rough rocks. A true gem, especially when lit by candles at night. Recreating a wonder of the world with bricks definitely is no easy feat. Capturing it on a 8x8 footprint is even harder. It gets worse still if you can only use classic bricks, so no Technic or minifig-related parts. The Classic contest on Rebrick definitely pushed me, but I'm happy with the result. On an 8x8 base and with no Technic or minifig pieces in sight I recreated Al-Khazneh, complete with decorated columns, fronton, monumental gate and remnants of statues. The only thing I couldn't quite cram in was the Holy Grail. [MOC] The Treasury of Petra by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr The antenna pieces was what got me started. From there on, it was getting the most out of classic bricks. I recently built the Architecture Brandenburg gate, and that was what really gave me inspiration to participate in this contest. I was intrigued how that set manages to convey all of the necessary detail with just basic bricks, employing them to shape the building rather than to depict anecdotic details. It drove me to work with a lot of offsets to get the most out of the system. It was something completely different than my previous build, in which the objective was to use as many exotic parts as possible to depict details. The result is a seven wide building with a lot of half-stud offsets and trickery to fill the holes in between the sports of the fences on the top. A result with a back that isn't entirely flat because I'm not a magician. But a result which in my opinion really feels like the original. [MOC] The Treasury of Petra - Visitor perspective by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr One of the hard things to get right when depicting anything from Petra, is the color. The color is just so distinct and part of the atmosphere of the place, but not well matched to a LEGO color. I went with the common solution of using tan bricks, but put a orangy/reddish light on it all to give it the sense of desert mystery in the morning. [MOC] The Treasury of Petra - Desk perspective by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr I had a blast building this and learning more about the wonderful place that is Petra. I loved the refreshment of getting everything I could out of the system. It meant not using gears for extra details on the dome or using some minifig accessory as broken statue, but I learned that the coherence of the build only benefits from it, especially at such a scale. I doubt that the creation would be better if I were allowed to use all kinds of bricks. So thanks Rebrick for hosting this contest. And thanks to all of you for taking a look at my 266 part creation! As always, the digital file is available here and you can find it on Rebrickable to make your life easier if you'd like to build it. Thanks again, and have a dreamy day!
  15. Hey guys, let me introduce you to my latest MOC, I really want to know what you think of it. Now this is my first Supercar, cause I usually build trial trucks and tanks. The source of my inspiration was the amazing Porsche 918 Spyder, which I wanted to convert to a solar-electric hybrid car. First of all, I tried to keep the proportions and details of the real model. Then, I struggled to integrate the solar panel and make it work and look good, thus becoming the first Lego Technic solar supercar to date. I’ve built it in the 1:10 scale, fully RC, driven by 2 L motors, has a motorized 4-speed sequential gearbox, advanced suspension geometry on both axles. Doors and hood open, has an adjustable spoiler, matching trolley, wiper, mirrors, head lamps, tail lights, brake calipers, and also a detailed interior featuring a working steering wheel, central console with GPS, gauges and pedals, the works :) Full specs: Weight: 1950g Size: 50 x 22 x 13 cm Transmission: 2 L motors (AWD) Steering: M motor (working steering wheel) Gearbox: M motor Solar acceleration: M motor Control: 2 IR receivers Power: 2 AAA battery boxes + solar panel Front axle suspension: double wishbone Back axle suspension: multi-link suspension Manual functions: hood, doors, wiper, spoiler Features: brake calipers, mirrors, head lamps, tail lights Stickers: custom-made But enough talk, I will let the photos and video speak for themselves. Sorry for the poor quality video, this is my first time I actually did any editing :) If you want to see the rest of the photos (93 in total), please see my Flickr album: https://www.flickr.c...57668871336033/ Thanks for your time, have a great day :)
  16. Hi Here is my dream Porsche. It features and combines 3 of my favorite things of Porsche: The front V8 TT engine and front bumper of Panamera Turbo S The 911 shape The RSR look and feel The result is this. Hope you (and judges ) like it Features. 1:10 Scale RWD and Fake V8 engine 4 Speed Gearbox with remote stick Independent suspension in the 4 wheels Working Steering Wheel (No HOG) Openable hood and doors (With lock system) Adjustable seats with gears Big Spoiler (Like the RSR models) Miscellaneous things like hand bag, lights etc. *Surprise feature* Removable V8 engine and transmission like a car About the last feature, well, I'll show it later in another pics and video. (I haven't had time to take more pics) Here are the pics of the last feature Making this function was the most difficult of the model, because it must be work smooth in every gear and I must find the proper joint points in the gearbox to the chassis. Also it must be easy to remove without bending or forcing the rest of the car. After many tests, I achieved it. More pics of the car This photo scream for the bigger Steering wheel (Sadly I don't have it yet) More pics and video will come soon The full gallery https://www.flickr.com/photos/137229326@N08/albums/72157668154949314 Video. The car was completed some days ago, but I decided to post it as my 100 post here, in the greatest Lego community
  17. marceriusLV

    [PORSCHE] GT X

    Hi! Yes, you have stumbled upon another Porsche in this forum :D Built for LEGO Technic Ultimate Contest "BUILD THE PORSCHE OF YOUR DREAMS" I present you my dream Porsche. A blend of past, present and future: sleek and curvy lines, rear mounted flat 6 engine, 4 gear manual transmission, rear wheel drive, full independent suspension grand tourer - Porsche GT X. I did not base on particular car, just went with flow. What started as a base for something like 911 developed to something Targa like car and ended up as next gen 928? I am quite satisfied what I managed to achieve as this is first completed so called supercar for me. Yes there were tons of things I wanted to put in the car, but I decided to scrap them, because they worked like crap (for example: raising rear spoiler in high gears, sequential gearbox). I believe that the greatest challenge to implement high number of functions is to make all mechanisms as small as possible and at the same time incorporate them in chassis and that takes time. For me it takes 2-3 months to figure out how to fit all wanted things in small places :D It was great experience to build this car, I hope, that next supercar will be better looking and more functions packed :) Some WIP pictures Gallery with more pictures here Just wanted to share my creation and get some feedback from other members, so please share your opinion. Cheers!
  18. This was built for the ReBrick Porsche competition. IMG_0741 by JJ2Sam, on Flickr IMG_0743 by JJ2Sam, on Flickr IMG_0742 by JJ2Sam, on Flickr IMG_0745 by JJ2Sam, on Flickr IMG_0747 by JJ2Sam, on Flickr IMG_0746 by JJ2Sam, on Flickr It features -Full RC with radio control -Rear wheel drive -Full independent suspension -3D printed rear differential, CV joints, and motor mount -Traxxas Titan 12T 550 motor -Futaba servo -Rear differential cover -futuristic bodywork -39cm long, 21cm wide, 12cm tall More pictures here https://www.flickr.c.../136426592@N04/ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRihM7Z2sns&feature=youtu.be Hope you like it.
  19. [Flickr Album] Throughout his incarnations, Makuta has always been a failed ruler, secretly coveting the admiration he was never qualified to receive. Here, he has succeeded; King Makuta, fierce defender of the people of Okoto, even at the small expense of their liberty. Freedom is a dangerous thing. Kneel to the crown. Been working on this guy for about a month for the Rebrick contest (technically I had a head start, but I'm going on vacation, so sue me =P). Haven't MoC'd with physical bricks since... 2010, I want to say, so a solid six years. Before CCBS. Pretty pleased with how it turned out, all things considered; there's stuff I could blather on about, but my favorite part is the crown, which was the original design impetus and took a while to get right, but just clicked in the end. Criticism, questions, critiques, etc. always welcome. Yes my photography is atrocious.
  20. This is my entry for the Rebrick competition. Essentially, it is a mashup of the 911 Targa and 918 Spyder (the 914.5 is the average of the two model numbers). It is built to 1:10 scale. Back in 2011, there were rumours of Porsche introducing a model between the 911 and 918 Spyder (one website did joke about calling it the 914.5), but such a model hasn't yet been manufactured (although it is being developed as the Porsche 960). The model is roughly 1:10 scale at about 58 studs long, 25 wide (27 including mirrors) and 16 high with 68.8x36mm wheels. Please bear in mind that I am a relatively inexperienced builder having only been building for 2 years and with only a few thousand parts to hand - by the end, I had completely run out of light grey parts. I went for function over form - while I am good with making ultra-compact mechanical systems such as gearboxes and suspended axles, bodywork isn't really my strong point. Sorry that the video is a little shaky - looking into getting better video equipment. Please watch it - you'll get to see the internal workings right down to the core! I haven't provided many pictures here because the detailed stuff is in the video. This is the FULL video (>1min) - the video I submitted to the Rebrick competition is a cut-down unlisted version of this. A full list of functions: Flat-6 piston engine in rear, driving rear axle. 8-speed paddle-shifting gearbox (sequential) for the piston engine. PF Large motor driving the front (no gearbox, just like the 918). Unfortunately, I don't have any IR components other than MINDSTORMS, so it isn't RC. Full independent suspension with non-zero camber and castor angles (I think it also has kingpin inclination - not sure about that). Steering wheel operates 4-wheel steering. The knobs on the front (black 12-tooth gears) and rear (hidden, accessible through rear window) control the suspension's ride height. Each wheel has its own control, so it is possible to make the car lean to one side (might be useful for oval racing). Two seats in the front with opening doors. Retractable rear wing. Folding targa-style roof. I also made a few custom stickers for this model (unprofessionally of course - just printed them out on paper). The Porsche logo is on the front, the steering wheel and the wheel hubs. The rear air intake slits (911-style) are also done with a sticker. I added the Porsche brand name and a fake model name on the back. The "Spy" and "Targ" bits were edited out of the actual "Spyder" and "Targa" logos; the "914.5" was done from scratch. The number plates aren't my own - you may recognise them from the 42043 set. You can probably tell that I lacked good headlight pieces even after searching though my dust-filled System brick collection. The best I could find were white 24-tooth clutch gears - I guess that gives it a hardcore-TECHNIC feel. Thanks for reading :D!
  21. Offroadcreat1ons

    [WIP][PORSCHE] GT1 Racer

    Hello All, Today I present my entry to the Porsche contest on rebrick. I am waiting on a Bricklink order to improve this model's aesthetics and then I will post better images. The model has: Steering Front and rear spoilers An interior Roll bars Fake brake calipers, and a working mini V8 engine . NEW: The engine is now a flat 6 and the doors open. There is more coming soon... Thanks for reading, and have a great day!
  22. About 5 years ago, rumours were around hinting at a new supercar positioned between the 911 and 918 Spyder. Some dubbed it the "914.5", coming from the mean of the two model numbers. Unfortunately, such a car hasn't yet arrived, and I plan to solve that problem. This will be the true "Dream Porsche", taking features from both the 918 Spyder and the 911 Targa. It will combine the hybrid all-wheel drive and 4-wheel steering of the 918 with the iconic rear-mounted flat-6 engine and roof of the Targa. Here are my definite features: Flat-6 engine mounted in rear 8-speed paddle-shifting manual gearbox (connected to piston engine, driving rear) Fake electric motors "driving" the front and rear (as in the 918) Full independent suspension with camber angle, castor angle and adjustable ride-height (independent adjustment for each wheel). Not sure where the ride-height controls will be - probably under the front hood. 4-wheel steering (as in the 918) operated by the steering wheel. Opening hood and locking doors. 2 seats inside. Folding roof modelling the 911 Targa's mechanism. Here are features that I might add if I have enough space and parts: Brakes - not sure how these would be operated if they get added. A PF Large motor and battery box to drive the front axle. Like the 918, the front is single-speed. Unfortunately, the only RC stuff I have is MINDSTORMS, which would be too bulky for this. Opening rear revealing the engine. The car will be 1:10 scale - considerably smaller than the 911 GT3 RS from LEGO. I haven't started building yet - I still need to add a couple of finishing touches on my current build. However, most of the "technologies" (such as an 8-speed gearbox and adjustable suspension) already exist in my current build, so this will likely be finished by mid-July. UPDATE 1 (03/07/2016): Paddle-shifting mechanism and steering wheel mount Having dismantled my previous build, I have built this compact steering wheel mount with an integrated paddle shifter. The two levers on either side of the steering wheela are paddle-shifters. They shift when pushed inwards. Here is a side view: Each paddle makes a lever move downwards and hit the cross-shaped element. I initially used a knob wheel, but it was too small for the lever to make it advance far enough. When the lever extends, the cross rotates about 75 degrees before the lever blocks it from going any further. When the paddle is released, the lever retracts and allows the cross to rotate the final 15 degrees. The paddles have rubber bands to make them return to their original position when released. The part with the wedge-belt wheels can slide a short distance. It too has rubber bands - this makes the cross "snap" to the nearest 90 degrees and provides the turning force for the final 15 degrees of rotation. There is also a universal joint - this is connected to the steering wheel.
  23. PaddyBricksplitter

    Is rebrick dead?

    Hi guys, I went to look at Rebrick today and found it gone. They stopped updating the pics recently so my question is have Lego shut it down?
  24. Hi all! I've been riddled with doubt for a while now about the modulars. I have them, as I assume 110% of all of you have them as well. At every convention there are dozens of people displaying them. Lego fan sites are full of them. And I feel they are not very, erm, 'special' anymore, know what I'm saying'? I've bought all the modulars the day they went on sale, but I haven't bought the Parisian restaurant yet… I'm kinda bored with them… because I've seen them eeeeeverywhere I guess. Now, my question is: what do you guys do with your Modulars? Do you keep them on display as they are or do you remodel them? Do you use the bricks for completely different things or do you just change a bit (like adding a floor, changing the interiors or tiling the floors)? I think the modulars look great! But they are just a tad smaller in scale than my MOCs and they look weird together, so I wanna take them apart and rebuild them to fit more with my MOCs. I've started with taking apart the Petshop, but I stopped halfway through, wondering if I was doing the right thing, panicking, running around, arms flailing. What do you guys think? Reuse the bricks for original work like a heathen, or display them in all their conventional glory like a good boy?
  25. Hi there, fellow Eurobrickers! Back in the beginning of January, I was given a very special minifig - this one: ...on one condition, that I took some pictures of Mr. ReBrick in my city, Bergen, and with some of my MOCs. Above is one of the pictures that I took in the real world - but then I needed to take some with parts of my LEGO collection. So I thought, why not make a story of it? And maybe cram some interesting stuff in there? This is the result. There are some weird twists and turns here and there (mainly because it was written between midnight and 2AM), but I'm happy with it, meta jokes and all. And it's on ReBrick, so mission accomplished :) Enjoy (if the humour appeals to you)... Mr. ReBrick's Adventurous Day It all started when Mr. ReBrick, who was visiting, got to test drive my supercar. I mean, it's the sort of thing you let visitors do, right? He liked it quite a lot, it seemed. I've never driven it myself, obviously, as I'm much too big to fit. My s(t)igfig is very happy with it, though. "Maybe I should get a car," Mr. ReBrick thought as he got out of the supercar. "After all, I keep complaining about how hard it is to get around town. This one is a bit over the top, though, so I'd have to find something a bit more 'me'." Mr. ReBrick was going to head back to his hotel room, but then he stopped by an old friend on the way. Dan is an architect, and built his own house heavily inspired by some online pictures of a house in Argentina. And what do you know, Dan had a bit of advice when it came to cars. (Note: I didn't design this lovely house - it's the work of frogstudio. I liked it so much that I copied it years ago, but never took proper pictures of it until now. It features an interior, unlike the original, and I've just uploaded some detail shots, if you're interested.) "I've been very happy with this one, Mr. ReBrick. It's a Small ForOne, with a tiny engine, but just enough for me. I think you should consider one of these," Dan said. "Of course, I don't actually know anything about cars, but hey, it looks funky. And that's really all that matters. I don't really drive it all that much either, it mostly sits here looking good in my carport. And you're in luck - there's a dealership in the picture below!" So, Mr. ReBrick suddenly found himself in the next picture, at the Small Car dealership, where he was met by what was obviously a ver nice and friendly salesman. Not to mention honest. Obviously. "I'm interested in a ForOne," Mr. ReBrick said. (Note: I didn't design this lovely car dealership, either - it's the work of sens1992. I liked it so much that I copied this, too, but never took proper pictures of it.) "Ah, but you look like a man who cares about his image. Are you sure you shouldn't consider our new Klossbraid model? It's right there, on the top floor of our fancy, impossible-to-reach glass tower," the salesman replied. Honestly. While he made sure that his gold tooth caught the reflection of the sun (which wasn't really the sun, just a couple of cheap spotlights from a nearby Clas Ohlson shop). *whoosh* And, inexplicably, the car was right there, in front of Mr. ReBrick. He had to admit that it was something special - but could it really be practical? "Oh, yes, of course. Your need to shower at home will be drastically reduced, because you'll get soaked every time you drive it in the rain! And it's so easy to get in and out of, because look! The Klossbraid doesn't have any doors, just these bars that you lift up. The other bonus is that you'll get a refreshing splash of water from every car that passes you, as you're totally exposed to the elements." The salesman had it all figured out. Mr. ReBrick wasn't convinced. "Well, I don't know. It does look nice, and I like to stand out a bit. And my house is like most LEGO houses, so I don't have a bathroom, and your point about the shower is a good one. But don't you have something just a bit more... normal?" "Normal? And yet a bit flashy?" the car salesman wondered. "Then this one is perfect for you. Bright orange, but apart from that, completely ordinary. It even has a little squeaking sound coming from the engine, which is absolutely normal with these cars when they age a bit. Shouldn't give you any problems, at least not until you get a bit further down on this page. Oh, and it's sold 'as is', so it saves you the hassle of signing contracts and stuff." And then, the best part: "Did I mention the price? 100." "100 what?" "Just 100." It just so happened that Mr. ReBrick had exactly 100 in his pocket, and that pretty much sealed the deal. A car for 100? Where he comes from, even a Christmas tree at the Winter Village Market costs 100 these days. So for a car, that must be a steal. Right? As he drove away, he thought he spotted the salesman in the rear view mirror, collapsing from what looked like a laughing fit, but it obviously couldn't be that. I mean, Mr. ReBrick couldn't think of anything particularly funny about this. Then again, he'd always been bad at reading facial expressions. After all, he only had one himself. And he certainly couldn't find anything funny about being stranded by the roadside just five minutes later. "These modern cars," Mr. ReBrick thought. "You remove the grille tile, and there's nothing but a couple of hollow studs underneath. Back when everybody had the same carefree facial expression that I still have, and only a few even had hair (in one of the two hairstyles available), there were engines. Speaking of which, the rumble from a proper engine was suddenly heard. "My name is Doris," the butch-looking lady driving the hot rod said, "and this is my Blue Fury. I could probably fix that thing you call a car, as I know a thing or two about engines, but I don't really have the time. I'll tow you to the hot rod clubhouse, though, maybe they can help you," she added, and who was Mr. ReBrick to decline such an offer? As soon as they arrived at the clubhouse, Doris and the Blue Fury drove off. "Hi there. Doris said that you might be able to help me? I've just bought a car, and something seems to be wrong with it. It's just not working, Mr. ReBrick said. "I'm sorry. By the rules of the club, it's forbidden to service any car that isn't cool. And that thing... well, it's basically just an overgrown tangerine," said the girl in the hat that made her look quite a lot like... Stevie Ray Vaughn. "There's an old garage in the picture just below, though, so it might be worth trying there," she added, in a friendlier tone. But nobody offered to help Mr. ReBrick push the car from the previous picture and into this, so he had to do it all by himself. Luckily, the car was incredibly light. The garage was tiny, but the elderly owner, with - surprise! one of the two hairstyles available in the old days - was ecstatic about being able to help. "It's been years since I've seen a car that will even fit in my garage! When I first started repairing cars, they were all four-wide. The monsters they build these days... I tend to break off the mirrors if I try to get the cars into the garage. And that makes the owners very angry, for whatever reason. I mean, it's normally just a couple of hinge plates. It's not like they cost a fortune on BrickLink," the old man sighed. So, after having left his newly bought car in the safe hands of the old-fashioned garage owner, Mr. ReBrick once again headed towards his hotel. But now he was much further away. If he only could hitch a ride with someone. Hey! Wait... what's that sound? Wow! A Sky-Fi plane! "Hi! I'm Jon, and this is my V-22 Phoenix... well, actually, it belongs to Captain Gail Storm, but I've borrowed it since the Days of the LAB. Don't be alarmed by the big guns and the menacing black bomb hanging from the fuselage, it's just for show. Mostly, anyway," Jon said. He actually had a gun in his belt, too, although Mr. ReBrick first wondered if the pilot was just happy to see him. "You're not, by any chance, on your way towards that hotel in town?" Mr. ReBrick asked, realising just then how stupid the question sounded. "Of course I am! That's exactly where I'm going. Do you need a lift?" Mr. ReBrick nodded, and couldn't believe his luck... ...but he didn't quite see this coming. (Note: I most certainly didn't design this plane - it's the work of the pilot, Jon Hall, an extremely talented builder and a genuinely nice guy. I built it from instructions found in the LEGO Adventure Book, Vol. 1... and Jon had a couple of extra wing stickers that he very generously donated.) This experience was actually so terrifying that Mr. ReBrick developed a new facial expression, while he clung to the wing of the Phoenix, wondering how this could possibly be legal. "You probably can't hear me, but this is not legal, by the way," Jon shouted through the wind and the noise from the two massive engines. He was right, Mr. ReBrick couldn't hear him. "There you go, the hotel is just two pictures further down on this page," Jon smiled after touching down. "Thank God for that," Mr. ReBrick thought as Mr. Hall prepared to take off again. The good thing about normally only having one facial expression is that it doesn't take long to get over harrowing experiences. And Mr. ReBrick had never had a good short term memory anyway, so he was quickly distracted when a white truck entered the picture from the left. "Hey, I know that logo! I visited your studio just the other day," Mr. ReBrick exclaimed when he saw that it was a TV 2 van. "That's right," the lovely female reporter said, "but you disappeared so quickly that we didn't get a chance to talk to you. Can we have a word?" "Of course! I haven't been interviewed by anybody else than that guy from set 6661, and that's a long time ago. You're much prettier. Is that a Friends hairpiece?" Mr. ReBrick was almost falling in love. "It certainly is! You know your LEGO, Mr. ...?" "Mr. ReBrick! I have been sent out to spread some information about the ReBrick web page." And by the time the reporter had finished the interview, it was getting dark. Mr. ReBrick finally got back to his hotel room, which was a pretty unusual one, considering the fact that it came complete with teddy bear (and other extras). It was also a bit strange that it didn't have any walls, just a door. But now we're nitpicking. "Wow, that was some day! I tried a supercar, visited my friend who knows nothing about cars, bought an overgrown tangerine, got mocked by some hot-rodders, cheered up an elderly mechanic, caught a (terrifying) ride with a Sky-Fi legend and then, finally, got interviewed by TV 2. I have to come here more often," he thought as his head hit the pillow, after he had changed into his favourite pyjama pants. Maybe another day, there'll be another adventure...? Thanks for wasting a bit of time to find out how my mind works in the middle of the night. It's weird.