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Found 8 results

  1. The EMD F7 was the SD40-2 of its day, the first true "common" diesel locomotive; thousands were built and could be found powering almost any train. When production had ended some 2,366 F7As and 1,483 F7Bs had been produced by 1953 just four years after the locomotive was first cataloged. According to an article by Don Strack, published in the November/December 1991 issue of "Diesel Era: Volume 2, Number 6" the, "base price on two cab units was $161,000 and the base price for two booster units was $147,500." This was also the first instance of the Electro-Motive Division's new General Motors Diesel (GMD) subsidiary filling orders. Read more from this article about this historic loco on this site. My model was inspired by the Union Pacific 1471 and 1476B pictured below. It was really the only photo I could find of a UP F7 A/B pair. My initial inspiration came after recently obtaining sets 10020, the Santa Fe Super Chief, and 10022, one each of the dining, sleeping and observation cars. I can see why they are so coveted, each is beautiful!I set about to modify 10020 in several ways to make it look better. I decided on the UP scheme because my dad left me his LGB scale UP loco when he passed (just like his LGB BNSF that inspired this build, here). I modified the sides and doors to more closely resemble the F7a and F7b units (which I'm presuming the 10020 was based on). While the windows are not round (yet) the vents between them, the doors, the grab rails, plus the square sand fill doors are all details I tried to capture more accurately than set 10020 did. Plus the battery box and fuel tank underneath look better. I decided to add twin train motors to the a-unit to propel it because my trains are heavy, my curves are tight and one motor just doesn't have the traction necessary (power yes, traction no). The PF receiver blends in nicely on the rear and the middle fan on top acts as a power switch. Seven of my eight locos have a concealed power "button" accessible from the outside, the Super Chief being my only one I have to remove the top on. Speaking of consistency between locos, my BNSF and CSX have a distinct side window look with the two vertical tiles. I'm considering that same look for my UP. The taped up windows look okay, especially from a few feet away, and while I like the slightly more detailed or scale appearance, the tape looks unfinished and I'm not sure it is necessary. I also applied minimal detailing on the inside. The b-unit got an engine you can see thru the windows and the a unit got a hint of an engine hidden in amongst the wires. The lettering and numbering I did myself on my inkjet printer using Testors decal paper. They are applied wet then they dry nice and smooth. As usual I'll share my LDD file for anyone who wants to examine, build or modify my design. I'll upload that soon. Here you go. https://bricksafe.com/pages/sed6 Hope you like! Edit: just realized I didn't print the X1471 decals that go by the headlights for the nose! Also in the pic above the stickers peeling off are actually just static cling stickers, they work well enough but show some bubbles and don't handle tight radius curves like on the nose. The final water-slide decals are applied in all the above pictures, except this one.
  2. Now that she's finally finished, complete with custom decals from OKBrickWorks, it is time to give her a proper thread. She turned out to be one of my most complex diesel engines to design and build, took almost 2 years to actually have her build as I just couldn't find a good solutions for the vents at the back. Containing over 1800 pieces, 2 PF train motors to power her, brickbuild zigzag in the stripes and a pretty complex nose, she's going to be a head turner for sure. The 1x2 plates and 1x2 plates with ladder are custom chromed from Chrome Block City. The enige in the back is my older SD70 That part of the build that caused a lot of design problems The complex nose Awesome decals by OKBrickWorks One last treat, together with the VIRGINIAN 2-8-8-8-4 triplex:
  3. Commander Wolf

    [MOC] Alco HH1000 Switcher

    I was looking at that thread about compact PF solutions, and I thought about posting this MOC. The Alco HH series is a line of very early diesel-electric switchers (made in 'Murrika of course) produced between 1931 and 1940 after which it was succeeded by the much more well-know S series. The HH1000 was the 1000HP variant of the HH series of which 34 were produced between 1939 and 1940. Because other companies' color schemes were more difficult to implement, my HH1000 carries that of Union Pacific. UP owned exactly one HH1000, numbered 1251, which it acquired from the Mount Hood Railway in the late 60s. It was probably retired not long after. The most difficult part of the prototype to implement in Lego was by far the cab. Ideally the columns at the corners of the cab would be something like 2LU x 2LU, but that is pretty much impossible in Lego. After much fiddling I was able to get 2LU gaps in the back, but the cab is too long by about a stud to accomodate 5LU columns from the side. You'll notice the PF receiver sticking out of the center window. To me the main feature of this loco is that it is the perfect shape to cram two M motors, the AA battery box, and the reciever into a body 30 studs long. The receiver is actually just floating because that's the only orientation that works. The tractive effort is a little less than what I was able to get out of the RF-16, a combination I think of less weight and shorter bogies, but for practical purposes it'll basically pull anything reasonable - just slowly. As far as I can tell having a gear ratio other than 1:1 is more or less impossible here. This model has been about 85% complete for the past month or two, mainly for testing, but I'm about to BL the remaining parts, so it should get done soon! I didn't realize dark gray/blay saber blades were so expensive; so spoiled by LDD now.
  4. This model is the last of the original Museum of Transportation vehicles I have planned on buying, but that doesn't mean I won't have more in the future... who knows what may happen. This model will be built at some point in 2019. Real World Background: Here is Union Pacific rotary snowplow 900081. It was designed and built in 1966 at the UP Omaha shops, and is the heaviest rotary snowplow ever built, weighing 367,400 lbs. Three or four diesel locomotives, which were controlled from the non-propelled plow, pushed it at four to six mph. The snowplow is powered by an EMD 16 cylinder 3,000hp turbocharged diesel engine that drives an electric generator, which provides power to turn the 12’ rotary blades at up to 150 rpm. A steam generator provided heat to the cab and can thaw out the blades if they became frozen. This rotary snowplow was last used in Green River, WY in the mid 1980’s, and it was donated to the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri in 1994 by the Union Pacific, where it is still seen today. LEGO model notes: I was inspired by Dr_Spock_888 and his rotary snowplow to build my own way back in 2014. Needless to say, it the originally 8 wide model didn't come out quite right at that time, so I put it aside for quite some time. I just recently remade the model into a 6 wide body with a 10 wide blade section, and have have smoothed out the roof studs with tiles. As before, the words "UP" (the initials of the former owner Union Pacific) should go on the studs towards the middle, while "900081" should go on the studs in the center in printed 1 x 1 tiles, right below the two UP tiles. The blades are actually part of Dr_Spock_888's design, but mine do not move with the train like his... mine are not connected to the wheels on the track, and do not move unless you spin them with your hand. Inspiration: (Photo by Wampa-one from Flickr, not me) Complaints, suggestions, thoughts, & compliments are always welcome!
  5. Feuer Zug

    Santa train delivery

    A Union Pacific SD70-ACe delivers a unit coal train of Powder River's finest to Santa on Christmas Eve in time for next day deliver to all the bad boys and girl's stockings.
  6. Feuer Zug

    MOC - 7 wide UP EMD SD70ACe

    Behold, my first large scale locomotive MOC, the EMD SD70ACe. The engine is 7 wide, and runs 48 studs in length from coupler magnet to coupler magnet. Everything is brick built, not a single sticker to be found on it. Motive power is provided from two PF Medium motors each driving an A1A wheel set. A PF receiver sits where the dynamic braking grid would be, and the battery box is accessed through the hole between the air horns. I know the locomotive number belongs to a GP-38, but it worked in the size. Given the motor locations, there wasn't any room to build the internals for the cab. And now, a shot of the internals. You can see the two PF Medium motors rather easily in here, along with the battery box and PF receiver. Given the generous length of the locomotive, I plan to upgrade it to two L motors next time I hit the LEGO store in Koln. It hauls a lot of wagons, but lacks speed. If the motor upgrade doesn't speed it up, at least I'll be able to haul a lot more. I'd like to thank everybody that's posted their MOCs up here. I've cribbed a few ideas from stuff to improve the looks.
  7. Barduck

    MOC UP EMD SD70

    As promised, my version of the Union Pacific EMD SD70. A lot of the build is the same as the BNSF version I did but there are some differences. Looking at the BNSF version they are easy to spot. Getting the last few pieces took longer than expected, hence the delay in building her. And putting the stickers was a real pain in the you know what. But I'm really satisfied on how she turn up in the end. MOC UP EMD SD70 by Barduck12, on Flickr
  8. The EMD trains frequent this LEGO Train Forum now and then. Of course there is the EMD E8 Santa Fe Super Chief, but others like Tearloch already made EMD's as well! Today I want to present my finished EMD E9 model: A video demo can be found here: I connected an Arduino Pro Mini to the LEGO LiPo, I also connected the normal IR receiver to the LiPo and connected the Train motor to it. B.t.w. I ran out of gray wheels so unfortunately one gray wheel. I use the small PF remote to enable / disable the Mars light / gyrolite (depending on the brand ;)) and the orange blinker. The Arduino uses a custom LEGO PF Remote receiver sketch and a typical 940nm IR receiver. The left one shows the gyrating light (2 SMD LEDs), the blink light also has a small SMD LED connected to a simple (insulated) copper wire. A peek on the inside: The IR receivers are at the right, the small one sticks out a little bit, enough to receive IR signals.