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Found 140 results

  1. Hi everyone, Finally, I have finished a project which I was building since last September. It is the scale model of the Intrac 2011 snow blower which is/was often used in the swiss alps by the army and other communal parties. It was the aim to create another working snow blower after the success of the snow blower from last winter. The blower is powered by three buggy-motors which are all controlled by a separate Sbrick. Each track is driven by two PF XL motors. The snow blower shoot direction is controlled by two 9-volt micro motors and the height of the snow blower by one PF L motor. As power source I used two Buwizz as battery or a custom lipo battery. After a certain time in the cold I had the replace the Buwizz with the custom lipo battery. Cheers FT
  2. Hey guys, sorry I haven't posted in a while. I've had the clips to make this video for 2 months now, but not enough time to edit. Anyhow, with that said, here's what I have done. I have rebuilt both of the rear axles so they can be driven by 2 L-Motors, and rebuilt the front axle so that it can be steered by a servo, and still be able to fit an engine and have room in the cab for other motors. I also rebuilt the front of the truck since it seemed too sparse to me, but I've left the rest of the truck (besides some of the internals) original. I decided I only wanted to use a single Sbrick, and I had only one port left, since there was already an M-Motor in the model to drive the functions connected to the distribution gearbox, so I built a custom sequential shifter that I could fit in the cab, and access the axles of the changeover catches in the gearbox, and thus shift through the functions sequentially. This is done with one M-Motor. All of the internal mechanics of the gearbox were left stock, besides the elimination of any white 24 tooth clutch gears. I did not change the rest of the model that much, though I did think having an inline-4 seemed kind of lame, so I put in a V8 instead. i will not release any instructions due to the extense of the modifications. Please enjoy the video and photos below, and feel free to leave a reply!
  3. I'm thinking of getting a Lego device that will give my models more power and allow me to control them outside and from long distance using my smartphone. As far as I am aware the best two options are BuWizz and SBrick, however I am not sure which option is best, as comparisons I have seen have never determined a clear winner. SBrick is way more affordable, more compact and seems to be popular in the Lego Technic community. I only learnt about BuWizz recently, it seems to generate an insane amount of power but it costs over twice as much as an SBrick and is bulkier, plus I already have 6 Battery Boxes and it would be a complete waste not using them. Of course they are both clearly better than the Official Lego PF IR Sensors I am currently using, which are god awful past a 2m range and are useless outside, however I would like to know people's thoughts, opinions and experiences to help me decide which is best value for money before I blow loads of cash on a toy. Currently I am leaning towards SBrick, but from what I've seen online, BuWizz looks like a viable option also. Cheers
  4. Updated: BrickController Android application. It lets you to control Lego creations via Lego infra-red, SBrick and BuWizz V1 and V2 using any Android compatible game controller: Current version: BrickController 0.32 User guide: BrickController User Guide Minimum system requirement: Android 4.4 and bluetooth low energy support on the phone (or tablet) Video on the older SBrickController application:
  5. I am continuing to explore the fascinating world of the pipe transportation with a new prototype. You may already have seen it on youtube, I’m a bit late to post here (busy week-end). If you have a good memory, I did a first prototype on track (here) that had some limitation; in particular it couldn’t transport more than one pipe at once. The complete album is available on FlickR Prototype 2. For this second iteration, I started again form a white sheet to try something new : The transporter is now on tire with multiple axle steering for a good maneuverability and good translation speed (more adapted to road). I choose to keep two cranes for the consistency with the first proto. First advantage this allows making them smaller, as each crane support almost half of the weight of the pipe they don’t need to be reinforced and a mini actuator is enough to make them move. Second advantage is that the pipe remains horizontal even if not loaded exactly on its center of gravity. What’s inside ? There is 6 functions in this truck (5RC + 1 manual). Propulsion on axle 3 and 4. Steering on axle 1-2 and 5-6. The cranes : 1- 360 degrees Rotation. 2- 90 degrees Lift. 3- Cable. The truck was built from the center to the extremity, both crane are a copy-paste and are actuated by the same motors placed in the middle of the truck. Advantage: the crane move simultaneously and are always in the same position, drawback: you can’t use only one crane if you want to (I don’t know why you would have to use only one crane but well.) This was a choice at the conception because the goal of this prototype was to test the concept. With an alternative built it would have been possible to upgrade the truck so each crane have its set of motor , and the simultaneous movement is manage through the software (because yes, SBrick allows you to control several port with one command) Last functions are the additional lateral support that are deployed manually. They were added lattely in the building process (when I tried to install a larger pipe that clashed with the cranes), so I did not had enough room left in the truck to install the pneumatic line. Not a big issue in my opinion, I will do better next time. Good and not compare to the first prototype: Good Can transport more than one pipe Can load/unload up to two pipe in total autonomy No real length limitation Better road capabilities Not good Still requires a manual intervention to catch the pipe Range of operation : Cranes are not long enough to load the additional support. The dual crane are still not independent. Some improvements are still possible. So, project to be continued. Thank you for reading Edit: One additional word: in the video you can see a support vehicle. It is a not-so-good mini forklift only used to load the truck, It has been possible by the use of a 3rd Sbrick (both vehicle controlled through the same interface) and 4 M motors. Dedicated video here (yes I was terribly boring when I did the miniature ):
  6. Hi to everybody! I'm here to present my new Moc. I started building this crane truck about 6 months ago with the main idea of solving the problems related to a failed attempt of a crane for my previous truck. IMG_1608 by Lucio Switch, su Flickr Starting from the cab...despite the undeniable resemblance to the cab of the dump truck (with a bit of the tractor truck), it has slightly different dimensions, and the add of some new details/functions, forced me to revise it completely. In fact, in addition to the "standard" opening doors, this time, as on real trucks, the cab is suspended, while maintaining the tilting function and the working steering wheel and the front grid is openable. Moreover the seats are pneumatically suspended via 2 (1+1) 1x5 pneumatic cylinders. The chassis has the tractions on the 2 last axles, they are driven by 4 XL Motors and uses 2 Servo Motors to steering the first two axles (with different turning radius). The first two axles use independent suspensions. In this case I was inspired by the Mod of the chassis of my Tractor Truck done by Efferman ... that has a perfect shape for a fake v8. On the back there are 2 live axles (with a total of 24 hard shock absorbers). Between the first two axles there are two small pneumatic pumps moved by two L Motors. In addition to that, on the chassis are present 2 Li-Po Battery, 5 Leds for lights and 2 SBricks. Behind the cabin there is the base of the crane, it contains the front stabilizers, extendable via a M motor (connected to one SBrick), 6 pneumatic valves, moved by an M motor each, 4 IR receivers to control the 6 valves motors plus 2 other M motors, one to rotate the crane and one for the winch. The 4 receivers take power from a port of an SBrick. Finally the crane ... well, the classic design of this type of crane with the upper arm offset (as on 8258 for instance) built on this scale, gave me big problems twisting the whole structure ... and a lot of headaches. One day I came across by chance in a truck with a Cormach crane, it presented a unique design that would solve the twist problem. So inspiring to this design, I have developed my crane, which consists of a telescopic upper arm (extension via 2x 1x11 pneumatic cylinders) supported by two side arms moved by 2+1 2x11 pneumatic cylinder each. It isn't able to lift heavy loads, but it works and, considering the masses involved, I'm fine with that. Now some numbers: Length: 86,4cm 108studs Width: 24,8cm 31studs, 28cm 35studs with mirrors Height: 39,2cm 49studs Weight: 8.6 kg Total number of parts: 8000 PF elements: M motor: 9 L Motor: 2 XL Motor: 4 Servo Motor: 2 PF LED: 5 Lipo Battery: 2 ..and a couple of wire extensions Pneumatic Elements: Small pumps: 2 1x5 Cylinder: 2 Medium Cylinder old: 4 Medium Cylinder new: 2 1x11 Cylinder: 2 2x11 Cylinder: 6 Valve: 6 ..and several meters of pipes. For more pictures check my Flickr Album: Crane Truck Flickr Album And this is the video: To conclude, I would say that, in some way it was a new and interesting experience for me. Due to circumstances beyond our control, I was forced to transfer my Lego room in the basement, comfortable although perhaps a bit rustic but not directly connected with my apartment. This, coupled with the fact that my free time has been drastically reduced, has led me to review my usual workflow. So this is my first model built before digitally and then physically. This way allowed me to use better my free time and to select and pick up only the needed parts to build, reducing drastically the mess in the living room. Also part of the work for the BI is already done, I'll done them for sure, but I don't have idea when they will be ready. I'm afraid that it will be a huge job! I hope you like it!
  7. Hey, Eurobricks! It’s been a long time. And for me it’s been a really tough time. Actually I’ve been suffering from anxiety disorder and OCD for a long time. It seems I can just handle it and not let it affect my life (which I did also for a long time) but things got out of control in the past few months. It’s the darkest time in my life and basically I lost interest in doing anything. God knows what I’ve been through. Luckily I got my family with me all the time. More importantly I didn’t do anything bad & stupid to myself. It is still a recovery process for me, but I think I’m well enough to pick up some unfinished LEGO projects, something I love to do, and something that will make me feel better. So today, I’m bringing you one of those projects - a LEGO version of the SHERP ATV. Parts count: 1374 pcs Weight: 1420 g Dimensions (Length x Width x Height): 232 mm x 195 mm x 178 mm / 9.13 in. x 7.68 in. x 7 in. Exterior I like this kind of compact vehicle, especially with massive tires. While building this model, I have a single goal for the exterior: full enclosure. It all started with the mudguard. I tried to use Technic parts to build the middle section but it’s nearly impossible to recreate the curves with no gaps. So sloped bricks become the best choice. To compensate a little bit on the extra “unnecessary” weight, the enclosure is also used as part of the gear housing. Drivetrain Instead of putting two identical motors on each side and making it skid-steer drive, I decided to make a drivetrain based on a subtractor. It made precise steering possible, and can be controlled one-handedly by Sbrick, which something I prefer when I drive the model while holding the camera on the other hand. This is a prototype: It’s a failed attempt. Knob wheels not only cause unsmooth power transmission, but also take the space of a 5x7 frame, which is supposed to be a sturdy housing for the lower differential. As a result, the lower diff got damaged from gear slipping after 5 minutes of test drive, the whole model couldn’t move completely. After several tests, I replace the knob wheels with 16-tooth clutch gears. it only introduces very little frictions and it’s very reliable. Here is the final version: Performance I made a short video (4K): More Details Hope you like it. Feels good to be back
  8. Here is a sneak peak of one of my biggest projects up to date: Project started with a new type of a gearbox, which uses only two toothgears at any time in order to transfer power from motors efficient to the wheels: Here are a few specs of the model: Length cca. 80cm when folded Width cca. 30cm Height cca. 25cm Weight cca. 4,5 cm Dual rear live axles in the back independent suspension in front 4 electrically controlled gears + 1 additional electro-pneumatically controlled gear Working towing arm in the back capable of lifting weights of over 1kg Dynamic lights All functions controlled by 3 Sbricks Currently we have snow here and I can't shoot a video as planned I will post more info as soon as I manage to take more photos and a video.
  9. Hello, my entry for the TC6 contest it's a heavy forklift truck, the Hyster 32-12. The model has 8 functions (4 IR or 2 sBricks), it's 50% built at the moment and nearly completed on LDD/MLcad. Soon I'll put updates (photos, video, notes) Here a pic of what an Hyster 32-12 is: Thanks, and hold on for news. Video:
  10. Hi Newbie around here, used to play with lego back in the days and somehow got back into it but this time as grown up and and adjusted gaming budget ended up buying some Lego Technics models along the way (mainly stuff with tracks :) ). So got my hands on the 42065 Tracked Racer, really liked it but fell in love with the B-Model/Off Road Truck and started putting my two RC 5292 motors into it. Here is a short video about the evolution to my so far "final" v5.3 Mod: Short recap about the progress: replacing the two PF motors with the RCs, and going for an SBrick increasing the wheel base and changing to 3:1 gearing, then getting to know about the fuse inside the battery box, adding suspension, moving the battery up increasing the wheelbase again to get two battery boxes inside and double the SBricks, and change to 1,667:1 gearing Putting the RCs horizontal with a 2.5:1 gearing Currently working on: Getting a GoPro attached Getting it a bit water/splash proof to be able to go through some puddles (so far cling foil wrapping battery cases) ToDo: Get some filminig done of the v5.3 with the 2.5:1 gearing Getting the PS3 controller working on the Nexus 5 together with the SBrick Future ideas Improving suspension, weight is currently heavy on the rear Getting a winch into it on the rear or front Automatic two gear box to get faster on plain surface and getting more torque when going through terrain, looking at sariels automatic two gear box so far, but it probadly wont fit p.s. These are my first attempts at shooting videos as well, so bear with me ;-) . Most of them are handheld from my Google Pixel while driving with my other hand on my old Nexus 5
  11. Hello! My latest MOC is a re-creation of unusual Jeep model. Jeep Mighty FC Concept -Weight: 2125g -2 XL motors for propulsion -Servo motor for steering -M motor for 2 speed gearbox -M motor for locking rear differential -M motor for winch -3 LEDs for front and rear lights -2 SBricks powered by one rechargeable battery box -Portal axles -Openable doors and tailgate -Shallow bed with fold-down sides -Detachable roof -Alternative tube doors The chassis is not realistic, but has decent offroad capability as heavy Lego model. My goal was to make a sturdy and powerful crawler having propulsion motors and gearbox on the center of its chassis. Which means the drivetrain contains two universal joints - weakest points - for transmitting the torque to front and rear live axles. To save U-joints from damaging, I adopted two stage reductions after differential on both axles. The gearbox is similar one to my previous FJ40 Crawler. I doubled the pair of 8T/24T gear for higher durability. High gear is three times faster than low gear. You may wonder why rear ball joint is connected lower than front. That is for avoiding body roll caused by high torque of hard-coupled XL motors. Seeing from the gearbox, the rear output rotates in opposite direction to the front one. So the front and rear axle are equally forced to rotate in opposite direction to each other. Thus the center chassis with heavy body does not easily roll left or right even when climbing steep incline. (...at least on paper. I admit the complete body is a little bit too heavy to prove the theory above.) Steering angle is good, but turning radius is not so good. Because of the lack of center differential, it cannot handle different rotating speed of front and rear axle in tight turning. On slippy surface, like in the video, it can be steered without any problem. Rear differential can be locked instantaneously. The role of 8T gear on top of red changeover part is to make a tiny gap between 16T clutch gear and driving ring in locked position. Thanks to the gap, 16T gear is not pushed against outer structure. That helps to decreasing the friction. Front winch is powered by M motor geared 9:1. I used two pairs of 8T/24T gear instead of worm gear. It is smoother and surprisingly powerful. The hook can be manually pulled out by switching the lever under right seat. The body looks a bit squarish comparing to the real Mighty FC. Maybe I could replicate trapezoidal shape of its cabin. But I thought angled pillars and roll cage would be wobbly. So I decided to build simple yet sturdy. Instead of realistic appearance, I managed to realize easily detachable roof and doors. Although the whole MOC is built for using Unimog tires, Claas tires also fit well. But the maximum articulation of axles would be smaller because bigger tires possibly touch the chassis and fenders. It would be necessary to limit suspension travel or slightly modify the chassis. I hope you will like it! I will make building instruction. But I have to finish the instruction of Pickup first.
  12. At the beginning of 2018, TLG has released a new series of Lego City sets, including the 60188 Mining Experts Site with a big drilling machine called The Crusher. It’s some sort of a hybrid between a tunnel drilling machine and a bucket wheel excavator. #Makeitbigger I’m not a big fan of re-build/improve official lego set but a take one CITY set and #Makeitbigger in TECHNIC is surprisingly challenging. (A good idea for a contest in my opinion). The Crusher XL’s MOC is not an exact upscale of the 60188’s Crusher, I built it like a “bigger” one, but still at minifig scale, with Bluetooth control through 2 SBricks and some power function elements: - 1x Battery Box - 6x PF-M Motors - 2x PF-L Motors - 5x PF-LEDs - 3x 15cm cable extensions - 1x 50cm cable extension The main differences with the original model: - The tracks are doubled and driven by a PF-M motor each. - It is composed of two parts. The lower part is the vehicle. It is built on a cross structure with track at each side. The 11x11 rack from set 42055 are reused to rigidify the assembly and support the upper superstructure. (LDD on google drive here) - The upper part is the superstructure. It can rotate nearly 300 degrees (the limitation is here to preserve the PF cable) and contains the electrical heart of the machine. The small PF-B battery box is place at the rear to be used as counterweight and completed with two boat weight (73090b);There is 4 motor and the 2 SBricks fitted in this little space to control the mains function. - The cabin is a reuse of the 42055 set. It fits well to this model and defines the minifig scale of the vehicle. The position has been forwarded for the operator to have a better view. - The arm is raised and lowered by cable actuated by a PF-M. A single cable is used between the two winches so it can accommodate the difference of position. - There is no moving counterweight (‘cause it is ugly) - The drilling head can tilt. It is mounted on a turn table and can turn to 360 degrees. The turntable is old and jam a little so the movement is not very smooth. Both drilling and tilting function are powered by a PF-L motor each. The Video : Possible improvements There are some points I initially wanted to include in this MOC but they wouldn’t have fitted in this scale. So I keep them in mind if one day I decide to build a Mk.2 : - 360 degree rotating track instead of a rotating superstructure: the challenge here was to find a means to control each 4 tracks separately (see picture below) - Telescopic arm: why not ? - Material belt conveyor between the dual drilling head like a bucket wheel excavator Thank you for reading :)
  13. Quick question for those who own a SBrick, do you know if a Samsung S5 will work with an SBrick? Considering getting an SBrick, but don't know if I have the correct phone for one. Thanks!
  14. Updated: The (almost) final version of the app is ready, app renamed to SBrickPad. For now, you can download the source from my GitHub page: https://github.com/BarakRL/SBrickPad If there will be enough demand I'll make it available for download from the App Store. The app supports MFI and iCade gamepads, on-screen gamepad will be added later this month. More videos coming soon. --- Well it's not done yet but it's getting there. I've added support for both iCade and MFI gamepads and many other features: precision controls (you can even set the easing curve if you want) SBrick connection recovery multiple actions per button event (press/release/value change) so you can control multiple motors with one button or simply play an engine sound while the car is accelerating load/save (and share) action sets import sounds many other things I can't think off right now Do do: Edit actions UI (you can now only edit the json file) On screen virtual gamepad (so it can replace the SBrick app for people without gamepads that still want more control) Make it pretty Documentation etc. The app is still in development, but the source is available to download from my GitHub if you want to play with it already: https://github.com/BarakRL I would love to hear your feedback!
  15. Tommy Styrvoky

    [MOC] IS-7 Heavy Tank

    Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr After more than half of a year, it is complete. More info on my Blog. Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Lego RC IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr Coming soon by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr 1/35th scale model also built by me for reference. 1/35 Trumpeter IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr 1/35 Trumpeter IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr 1/35 Trumpeter IS-7 by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr
  16. Mercedes Benz Arocs Crane Truck Full rc MOC with 21motors, 2 sbricks. 100% lego orginal parts
  17. I've wanted to build another bike MOC for quite some time now, seeing that my Stealth Bike from 2 years ago had plenty of room for improvement. I wanted to make one that drives much faster and remains more stable than my Stealth Bike, and to get as much speed as possible out of the PF system. The idea for a second bike came after getting the 42054 set on discount. I saw the tires as a perfect opportunity for a bike, as their size means that I can make a bike large enough to fit all the electronic components inside. I also found that they are not easily tipped over, which is advantageous for a bike model. To reduce friction, I connected two L motors directly to a single wheel geared 1:1, which was a lot of speed for PF. In fact, I was very surprised that I did not have to use RC Buggy motors (which I don't have) to get such speed. The MOC features a modular build, with the rear wheel/suspension part being attached to the main body which housed the battery box, and the steering mechanism coming off of it. The suspension worked well and had decent range, and is not overly stiff. I used an interesting mechanism for the steering, which involved a servo motor controlling 2 links that steered the front wheel. However, I had to reduce the servo's angle to 45 degrees in the profile designer, as making the full 90 will cause the servo to stall. A small turntable allows the wheel brace (I'm not sure what you call that) to pivot as it steers, and there are handlebars that work. One thing I wasn't so happy with about this MOC is the large turning radius. Because I found large steering angles made the bike tip over easily, I had to make it small, and making U-turns in a reasonable space is nearly impossible. Another thing I didn't like is how steering must be done at low speed to prevent it from tipping over. This was worsened by the fact that it was quite windy the day I filmed it, which made it hard to control. Overall, this is a MOC I'm pretty happy about. I got lots of speed out of using just PF elements, and it did not become sluggish as weight was added on during the build. It was lots of fun driving it around, and remained quite stable without the use of support wheels Video: Photos:
  18. Foremost is a Canadian company specialized in oil & gas, heavy oil, mining, water well and construction equipment. You can have here on Foremost’s website a complete overview of their activities and product. Note that @Erik Leppen is also working on a Foremost truck; the Delta III, which can be viewed here to discover a great modular big MOC. On myside, I prpose youthe Commander Tri-Axle. The main and only goal of this MOC was to test the “tri-axle” design. The Commander C Tri-Axle was launch in 2011 and is a 8x8 evolution of the classic 6x6 Commander C. “by adding a third axle to allow for an extended oilfield deck while maintaining low ground pressures. This also increases the maximum payload capacity from 60,000 lbs (27,216 kg) to 80,000 lbs (36,287 kg).” says Foremost. In the main line the truck is an all wheel drive articulated truck mounted on Terra tires, equipped with a 500hp Cummins engine, a 11m bed and a 58t winch. The full documentation of the Commander Series is available here. The MOC. The truck is a 8x8 articulated RC truck. The full Album is available on FLickR There is three power function controlled through a SBrick controller plus a manual one: 1 PF-XL motor for propulsion (redution 1:1) 1 PF-M motor for steering (12t-36t-Worm-24t) 2 PF-LED for headlight Manual winch with locking system The tires used are 68.8 x 40 Balloon Large. The front axle is only pendular, just to simplify the construction. The 3 rear axles are pendular and independent from each other. The forward axle has stiffer shock absorber to support the weight of the 2 motors and the battery box. The winch is manual and equipped with a locking mechanism. There is only few details in the cabin, it is actually hard to find pictures, it is a simple three seats cabin. The driver’s seat is equipped with some instruments. (the music in the video may not work properly ) Some Bonus. The Commander fitted with a "special" load for delivery: The commander fitted with gopro mount for outdoor filming: Nose 360 degrees mount Lateral 360 degrees mount (can bee fitted on both side) bed upper mount The aft cabin support used in the video has been included later so picture available Thank you for reading ! All my other MOC available here below ↓
  19. Lego RC E-100 super heavy tank by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr I have been busy with my latest model, the WWII German prototype vehicle E-100. This one being my second rendition of it since 4 years ago, when I started building MOCs. This one is smaller and greatly improved scale accuracy. more information and photos on my blog. http://tommystyrvoky.blogspot.com/2018/02/e-100-super-heavy-tank.html instructions https://www.rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-13061/TommyStyrvoky/rc-e-100-super-heavy-tank/#comments The process of rendering all of the animations for this video took some time, as I rendered all of this on my laptop, the end result, each frame requiring about 5 minutes at only 720p , and well there are a few thousand frames rendered for the animations, and I also completely redid my channel outro with the new PBR shaders from Meccabricks. Lego RC E-100 super heavy tank by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr And after all of that time rendering I realized that I forgot to include the second turret hatch... This is probably one of my most accurate vehicles so far, given the constraints of lego, and the mechanical challenges. Though I am still striving to do better in the future. Lego RC E-100 super heavy tank by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr and a comparison with blueprints from the real one. E-100 Blueprint overlay by Tommy Styrvoky, on Flickr
  20. Where are you buying your Sbricks? I ordered from the SBrick site a month ago and haven’t heard a thing.
  21. Hey guys! So, my intention was to replicate an industrial robot arm with 6 degrees of freedom, I am pretty satisfied with the result. As I do not have any Mindstorms, I decided to build it only using Power Functions. For operation, I use 2 sBricks, which allow me to do precise movements, from an interface of my own design. Most joints have a large movement range, it can lift up to 150g of weight and the operation speed is intentionally slow, for better control. The arm uses 7 motors, which can all be controlled independently. It has 1 XL, 3 L and 4 M motors. The arm is powered by 2 battery boxes, a large one in the base and a small AAA on the custom turn-table, which I am very proud of. By the way, the total weight is 2800g, so quite heavy. It actually took me one month to create, so it's definitely my longest build to date. But enough talk, here's the video (you maybe saw it on FB already). Here's what you can do with the robot arm, using a nice sBrick sequence: Photos are next: Feel free to comment an share your thoughts, thanks for your time If you want to see all the pictures, see my Flickr album: https://www.flickr.com/photos/braker23/albums/72157692147505855 PS: I will post more content soon, this is just the beginning!
  22. To be honest this video was supposed to be my video releasing a new version of the RC Car with Sbrick along with some instructions. However, after a request for a build battle by LEGO Technic Mastermind, I have decided to postpone that video, but that will happen sometime in the future. In the meantime, I have made a rear-wheel drive sports car with an opening hood, small-cylinder V8 engine, functional headlights and taillights with PF LEDs, full independent suspension on all four wheels, a steered front axle with toe in (steered by a PF servo), and a four speed manual gearbox driven by 4 PF L-motors. To control all the powered functions, I have used two Sbricks, each connected to their own AAA battery box. I have not much else to say, just enjoy the video and photos below.
  23. The SBRICK profile designer documentation is pretty cryptic. Do the experts here at Eurobricks have some advice about using circuits and sequences to: 1. Gate a joystick control so that in one direction the motor only runs at full speed when the slider is moved all the way up (to 1.0), but leave the reverse control variable speed. Application: Flipper control for PKW's TC11 battle bot wheeled scorpion. The flipper fires with any forward motor motion, and often needs precise control when reloading. Gating the forward control will help limit misfiring. 2. Start a sequence from a button controlling a motor that is also controller by a joystick. Application: Automatically fire, and then reload the flipper.
  24. I present to you my Lego Technic Chilli Crawler! This is a complete makeover and overall improvement from my previous Carrot Crawler: http://www.eurobrick...howtopic=112037 Yes, I know. This is the second crawler that I named after a vegetable; expect more! Features: - Triangulated 4-link live axle suspension using 4 soft, black shocks. - 4x4 with one PF XL motor mounted parallel* to each of the two axles. A final gear ratio of 1:5.001, yes this may seem slow, but the enormous Super Swamper tires make up for it. - Speaking of that, 4 RC4WD Super Swamper tires. No, they are not Lego, I got them from a nearby hobby shop. - One L-motor for steering in the front axle, geared down via worm gear to 8 tooth gear, then a 12 tooth gear to a 40 tooth gear. The 40 tooth gear drives another 12 tooth gear that moves a 13L gear rack. - Portal hubs for all four wheels. Standard Lego Unimog for the rear axle for rigidity; custom triangular plate portal hubs on front axle for a steering pivot point closer to the center of the tire. - Good articulation, about ~55-60 degrees. - Controlled with an SBrick. - Powered by a Lego rechargeable LiPo battery. - Green Chilli Stem** * The mounting of the drive motors parallel to the axles was a must for this crawler. By doing so, I have not only eliminated gear slippage as there are no perpendicular gears, but there is also a ton more ground clearance in both the front and rear axle. The rear axle especially as the motor is actually on TOP of the axle. Crazy, huh? ** Makes the crawler look so much cooler. Challenges: - As with all 4-link suspension setups, the mounting and placement of both the links and the shock absorbers proved to be a rather annoying, tedious part of the process. I have, however, managed to make a VERY rigid triangulated setup where the shocks are not bent or warped in any way. - The mounting of the two lower links on the front axle was also difficult as there was virtually nowhere I could mount these links onto. I was able to (somehow) securely mount both the lower links and the shocks of the front axle onto 7L and 9L beams on either side of the motor. - Mounting the motors parallel to the axles proved to be hard, but actually somewhat straightforward when it came to the rear axle. I had been so used to having drive axles perpendicular to the axle like on my previous crawler. The mounting of the front drive motor was difficult in the fact that its power is transmitted through various gears and the motor itself is connected to the axle by two plate beams and a pin or two. Although the front drive motor is still not completely rigid, I have had no problems with gear slippage whatsoever in either axle. Some pictures: And finally, here is the youtube video: I welcome any suggestions or comments you may have. I will, however, say in advance that I DO NOT plan on making a body for this crawler as I designed it for performance purposes mostly, a Lego "comp-crawler" as you may call it. Thanks, pt
  25. Even before the release of the Lego 42069 set, I’ve always wanted to make a 4x4 vehicle with triangular tracks. Seeing that the season is perfect for vehicles like these (the snow!), I decided it’s finally time I make my dream come true. The build started out with, obviously, making the 4 triangular tracks. Drive is transferred to the tracks via a large sprocket, and two small sprockets form the triangular shape. There are also two small wheels at the bottom that guide the tracks and help reduce slack. The track modules are attached to their axles with a small turntable, which allows it tilt back and forth and also keeps it well attached to prevent it from falling off. The axles are attached to the chassis with 4 suspension arms, 3 links, and 2 6.5L shock absorbers. The entire vehicle is driven by 2 L motors, with 1 per axle. A servo motor at the center of the chassis controls steering, with the front output controlling the front axle and the rear output controlling the rear. The drive/steering setup is similar to that of the 9398. Since there are no mechanical connections between the two driven axles, I added an extra M motor just to drive the V6 piston engine. The fake engine is chain-driven and can be seen by opening the hood, which can be locked in place. The model also includes Lego LEDs that light up the front lights. However, due to the bright sunlight when I filmed it, I could not demonstrate this feature. As for the performance, the model could drive on snow pretty well. The use of tracks over wheels was advantageous in that it has better weight distribution, which reduces stress on the motor. However, since tracks are a lot less grippier than wheels, even a small obstacle means that the tracks will slip, so I had to omit differentials in the drivetrain. The lack of differentials meant that one of the tracks on each axle will be stressed when making a turn, which is why one of the tracks can be seen driving slightly tilted when making a turn. Using rubber inserts, however, may have helped with the tracks slipping, but unfortunately I do not have any at this point. The tracks also feature stoppers on the back that limit their maximum tilt, as the tracks would often tilt too far in its initial tests, especially when overcoming an obstacle.The entire model is powered by a rechargeable battery, which, despite delivering less voltage than the AA battery box, gave the model plenty of power. Overall, I am very satisfied with the result. The model was a success not only in performance but also in aesthetics. In fact, I think this is my best-looking pickup truck model so far. Video: Photos: