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Found 347 results

  1. Hey guys, some time ago, I have coded an app for controlling Lego PF using the IR diode of your Android phone. It didn't really work well, but since this time I have learned a lot about programming and made a new app for you. It is a BETA version, but I hope that there will be no issues with it. Before installing this app please google whether your phone has an IR blaster, this app won't work on devices without an IR blaster (physically not possible). The channelswitch is not working right now, but I will add this feature soon. I would be happy about some feedback from you! APK: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1tDEC-1GvTAxX9PIu03F4pxTHOaOblbuM?usp=sharing (do not wonder this app doesn't have an icon yet! When you have an idea for it, let me know!) Screenshots:
  2. Hello everyone, I have purchased a lego power functions led light on Bricklink, to light up my 42043 MB Arocs. On real life trucks you often see that the rear lights are ‘double’. I modified the rear bumper of the Arocs to create this ‘double’ lights. But, the Lego LED light has only one light bulb for every side, so it will not shine trough two holes of a technic liftarm. Anyone any ideas how to achieve this?
  3. Hi everyone, I've finished trying to RC my 42043 and it seems that the PF L motor has issues providing sufficient power to drive the set? I obtained instructions from the creator of this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BpP_05uxKqs&t=22s&ab_channel=PawełWojnarowski) and also checked PPUNG DADDY's 42043 RC video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8easq7ueIo&ab_channel=PPUNGDADDY(뿡대디)-LEGOTECHNICRC), both used an L motor with no problems. Here's a video of the issue: https://youtu.be/J8P13WLPzN8. As you can see in the video, the motor loses power after driving for some time, eventually being unable to drive at all. The problem is worsened when I try to drive and steer at the same time, it's almost impossible to drive and turn. I have tried swapping the tyres around, changing batteries, trying a V1 and V2 IR receiver, switching positions of the motor and servo cables, and using a new L motor. But the problem still persists. Here's a photo of the L motor: Could it be because of excess friction introduced in the rear axles during construction? Because I noticed when I lifted up the rear axles, the motor spins the wheels at its standard rpm, BUT only 1 wheel on each axle spins, the other is stationary. Then when the wheels contact the floor, the motor suddenly seems to struggle with driving the thing. Hence I was thinking could it be that I built the differential too "tightly"? Appreciate any help from the technic experts in this forum, thanks in advance!
  4. Hello Eurobricker's I just wanted to show you one of my latest builds. Its an RC semi truck that has the ROOF based on a Scania Crew-cab! Love it or hate it here it is. Features Differential in the rear. Opening doors Spacious Cabin Detailed Interior Full RC L Motor and an M motor Working 5th wheel Easily removable battery box. Love it or hate it there it is. Please give me some feedback, I haven't made instructions yet as I don't know if anyone will be interested in building it!
  5. I got the Ecto for christmas and I felt the urge to squeeze in some remote controlled Motors. The new Powered Up have just the thing (although they are badly documented) One month after christmas I had it up and running. Tell me what you think. • quasi invisible • minimal invasive - all gadgets work • Battery replacement with no dissambling • light and sound kit still fits in • Lego POWERED UP Bluetooth Remote Control • no discontinued Power Functions • complete Instructions on rebrickable I made my first video about that: For this motorization I used LEGO's Powered Up Large Technic Motor for steering. That thing is just made to be used for the steering. It can act like a servo, because it has an internal position sensor. It is slim and dark bluish gray so it replaces that kardan drive below the front seat perfectly. Aditionally I didn't want to take it appart every time I change the batteries, so you can reacht it from the bottom.
  6. Zerobricks

    BuWizz Motor

    You can find a sneak preview od the 3D printed sample on our IG: https://www.instagram.com/p/CLAKIt3B0PG/ Performance is around 10% faster RPM and torque compared to the 5292 motor (cca 20% more power). The polyfuse protection will be increased from 0,9 A to around 1,35 A - still testing the balance between performance and longetivity. Improved attachment possiblities, everything fits as it should in the studless building system The final version color will be between LGB and DBG. It will come with a 30 cm long PF cable plug, so it's compatible with BuWizz 2.0 and PF. Preorder here: https://buwizz.com/shop/buwizz-motor/ More info when it becomes available.
  7. Hi guys! I'm thrilled to release MiniZip; the adapter that lets you power your lego creations from a 9 volt battery! I am releasing it on Kickstarter to cover the production costs, and I need your help to do so! You can see the full project here: https://www.kickstar...-lego-creations Here's a video about it: Thank you for your support!
  8. So I bought an rcx 2.0 and have some power functions extension cables that can also convert between PF and 9v. If I would connect PF to an rcx would it work?
  9. Hi,I thought about making an App for controlling Lego Power Functions 1.0(not PU). And now I am done with programming this app, without any programming knowledge. In the next updates I am going to make a PU remote too, so you can combine different Lego Sets and I want to make a Mini Jack IR Blaster Support for smartphones, that hadn t an IR blaster built in. Right now the App is only for devices with built in IR blaster. I know there was an App before for controlling Lego Power Functions, but this app had some features that weren t pretty good. This is also one of the reasons why I made this kind of App. Please open the Play Store Link on your smartphone.Link for the App:
  10. Hi folks, I made a motorization for the good old big Batman Tumbler, if youre interested, seems to be the only one out there, the instructions and details are here. full front suspension with moving swing arms (those big things in the front that hold the wheels, like in the movies) Power Functions servo motor steering system, nicely hidden so you won't see it through the windows or in the front what's more powerful than an L-engine and faster than a XL-engine? Right, two L-engines! This motorisation retrofit is fun! Differential for the back axle, with those big wheels you will need it all gears run stable, no cracking suspension for the back axis using springs of the same size as those pseudo springs from the original set a retractable roof (no separate roof parts like in the original) a few other small modifications to make it look a bit closer to the original and make it more sturdy not to lose parts while working very stable frame
  11. Does anyone know of an app or application that works with the old ev3 Mindstorms and technic power functions?
  12. Performing this modification will allow you to draw more current from your battery box. I tested the maximum current before the modification at 0.3A and the maximum current after at 6A. I have often found the over current protection built into the power functions battery boxes to be set a bit too low, for example, it is very limiting when using RC buggy motors. I opened up a battery box to see how easy the over-current protection would be to bypass, and it turned out to be very easy. My method is shown below: (Warning: performing the following modification will void the warranty of your battery box. Do not draw high currents for long periods of time because it may lead to overheating.) (I will not be responsible if you try it and break something) 1) Open up the battery box to gain access to the circuit board Remove the screws, then use a screwdriver to begin to pry out the battery holder, once it is about 5mm out, push in the plug on the top, and then fully remove the battery holder. 2) Prepare the electronics tools for bypassing the over current protection You will need: A soldering iron, solder, wire cutters, wire strippers and tweezers. A helping hands tool is optional but it helps. 3)Bypass the over-current protection This step is much simpler than it sounds, all you need to do is solder a wire over the polyfuse on the circuit board. First you need to locate the polyfuse, as shown in the image below The polyfuse rapidly increases in resistance when a high current passes through it. This is how the over-current protection works: when a high current passes through the polyfuse, the increase in resistance causes the current to drop back down again. To bypass the polyfuse, all you need to do is solder a wire across it. First you need to tin the wire so it can be soldered more easily. With some solder on the tip of your iron, heat up the wire from the back. Apply solder to the wire from the front and you will see the stands of wire absorb some of the solder. Now tin the other end of the wire and move onto the next step. Now all you need to do is solder the wire over the polyfuse. Use tweezers to hold the tinned end of the wire on one side of the polyfuse, then heat it up with the soldering iron to reflow the solder joint. Repeat this with the other end of the wire to achieve a result like in the picture below: 4) Reassemble the battery box and you are done! Notes: Do not embark on this project if you do not trust your soldering skills, soldering irons get very hot and could easily burn you. If the switch does not move after the battery box is reassembled, open it up again, remove the piece of wire, and replace it with a thinner one so that is does not jam against the switch.
  13. Hello EB! I'd like to humbly show this remote control (PF) winter expedition vehicle (MOC). Featuring 4 independently driven tracks with a unique steering system. More explanation below and in my YouTube video. It has many issues that I'm not willing to spend more time to fix, but I've learned a lot from the process, which will help improve my future MOCs. If I was to start from scratch here's what I would change: Put motors closer to driven axles Split drivelines into either front/back or single motor per tread less complicated steering system Use a different type of suspension instead of pendular raise the height of the driven sprocket instead of extending driveline with gears reduce weight with panels vs lifttarms (I didn't have any at the time of building) Never use an Adder again, or if I really have to then use the old-style 24t differentials Work more on the cabin/exterior design A sizeable portion of the issues stemmed from the weight, which is something I didn't expect! I ordered some parts to allow me to finish the frame, and added design elements in the meantime. The design elements were pretty much the difference between being-able-to-carry-its-own-weight and not. The MOC is already disassembled, but I'll be happy to hear feedback and suggestions!
  14. Hi everyone, Finally, I have finished a project which I was building since last September. It is the scale model of the Intrac 2011 snow blower which is/was often used in the swiss alps by the army and other communal parties. It was the aim to create another working snow blower after the success of the snow blower from last winter. The blower is powered by three buggy-motors which are all controlled by a separate Sbrick. Each track is driven by two PF XL motors. The snow blower shoot direction is controlled by two 9-volt micro motors and the height of the snow blower by one PF L motor. As power source I used two Buwizz as battery or a custom lipo battery. After a certain time in the cold I had the replace the Buwizz with the custom lipo battery. Cheers FT
  15. BrickController2 is an Android and iOS application that allows you to control your Lego models using a compatible gamepad. It supports the following devices: - SBrick - BuWizz 1-2 - Lego Powered-Up devices: Boost, PUP HUB and Technic HUB (or Control+) - PF infrared (on Android devices having infrared emitter). Features: - Multiple profiles for a single creation - Multiple motor (or output) assignment to a single controller event - Different types of devices can be used at the same time - The same motor (or output) can be assigned to multiple controller events - Different joystick characteristic settings - Different button modes: normal button, simple toggle, ping-pong toggle, carousel toggle, ... - Train mode on joysticks - Normal and servo mode for the new Control+ motors BrickController 2 on the Google Play Store: BrickController2 android BrickController 2 is also available on the Apple App Store. BrickController2 iOS Video tutorial created by @kbalage (many thanks for this): And another great video by @kbalage: Older versions: BrickController Android application. It lets you to control Lego creations via Lego infra-red, SBrick and BuWizz V1 and V2 using any Android compatible game controller: Current version: BrickController 0.6 User guide: BrickController User Guide Minimum system requirement: Android 4.4 and bluetooth low energy support on the phone (or tablet) Video on the older SBrickController application:
  16. Welcome to my garage LEGO!!! Hello! My name is Michael. I'm a Builder from Russia, I love muscle cars! But today I present you this epic American truck!!! Length 58cm, Width 23.5 cm, Height 34cm , Weight 4kg Description: -2 XL motor for drive -L motor for steering and steering wheel -1M Motor for cab lift -2 Small power supply -Detailed interior -Led headlights -Doors and hatches open -Semi-automatic coupling Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lego_muscle_garage/ Join my group in VK: https://vk.com/legomusclegarage All photos on the link: https://bricksafe.com/pages/Michael217/freightliner-fla-9664 Enjoy your viewing! Rate, comment! Thanks!)
  17. Hi All, I'm new to this forum, and new to the Lego RC train world. I have just started collecting this range with my son (who's 5) so this is mostly about me.... :) In all seriousness, he is over the moon with these trains and the sets in general and we have 3 already (60051, 60197 and 60198). I'm looking for some expert guidance as to the best and most cost effective way to be able to remotely control/motorise the switch tracks (points). Having done some research online, I see there are many ways, although i haven't found a definitive step by step guide yet. It would be good to get some valuable feedback and guidance from someone who has been through this process if possible (i.e method and functionality vs cost and practicality). Appreciate the time spent reading my post and any feedback received. James.
  18. RoxYourBlox

    [MOC] Galaxy Cliff Lighthouse

    My latest creation, Galaxy Cliff Lighthouse, reflects a desire to create an autobiographical MOC to share joy and pain non-verbally. It was inspired aesthetically by Split Rock Lighthouse on Lake Superior, thematically by Voyage of Life (1842) by Thomas Cole, and structurally by Obelisk Overpass, Boulder Dam, plus an early draft of River Wheel (featuring pirate ship gondolas rather than lumber). In fact, the 96 x 96-stud plot vacated by the dismantled River Wheel fed my drive to combine structures absent from my Lego city—a bridge, dam, and Ferris wheel. As you may imagine from the photos, a hilltop lighthouse teeters over an ocean, beneath a collection of galaxies spiraling through the nighttime sky, while a shooting star passes overhead. The light and dark figurative sailboats represent positive and negative memories, while the logarithmic spiral of galaxies in the sky is reflected in the earth below by the failed attempt of humankind to overcome the nature of life itself. Stats 26400 pieces 75 lbs (34 kg) Footprint: 96 or 128 square studs Volume: 156 x 156 x 176 studs Timeline Phase 1 Idea conceived: January 2020 Digital design: 8 weeks total Wheel: 2 weeks Lighthouse: 2 weeks Bridge: 2 days Cliff: 4 weeks Shipping: 13 weeks Building: 2 weeks Phase 2 Digital design revision: 1 week Shipping: 4* weeks Building: ongoing *Multiple international part orders in October never did arrive and had to be repurchased domestically. For more, follow me on flickr, instagram, or ideas.
  19. Hello. I have some sad news. Lego is retiring the power functions system. I need your guyses help to sign my petition by January 1st! we need 100 signatures. here is the link for the petition! here is the petition.
  20. Greetings, Train Tech! Here's a model of the BR24 steam locomotive from Germany, built at my usual 15 inches / stud scale: The BR24 (or "DRG Class 24") were a standard class of German locomotives built in the 1920s and 1930s. As was the case with most standard German designs, plans were drawn up and orders were placed from various manufacturers. They served through World War 2, and continued to serve into the 70s in West Germany, East Germany, and in Poland (as the Oi2 class) Most photos of the locomotives show them fitted with the larger Wagner smoke deflectors (the "elephant ears") -- I've chosen to model the locomotive with the smaller Witte deflectors, which were fitted on a few examples later in their life. I was motivated to build this locomotive for two reasons. First, I wanted a suitable locomotive to go with the Umbauwagen I had built. Secondly, I hadn't seen many new takes on this model since Ben Beneke's version from the early 2000s! There are many builders who have modified Ben's design, often substituting BBB medium wheels for the rare large wheels from the set 7750. However, my typical scale is larger than the scale of Ben's model, and I also wanted to leverage some new parts that have come out since. Like most of my locomotives, this model features Power Functions. A single M-motor beneath the cab powers the drivers at a 5:3 reduction ratio. The locomotive is fairly light but pulls adequately, and there's room in the boiler for additional weight if needed. In a way, this model helps to understand and demonstrate how little weight and torque you can get away with; I see a lot of builders cram extra motors into their locomotive, when the torque can't be transmitted due to a lack of weight. The tender houses the Power Functions receiver and battery box. The 3-axle tender has a rigid frame, with the center axle sliding to negotiate curves (I used a similar geometry on the TP56 locomotive). The body of the tender lifts off for access. The battery box is mounted sideways to better take advantage of the shape of the tender. Coupled together, the locomotive has decent reception from all angles except the front, where the cab blocks the receiver. Incidentally, my model of the 2MT, which exhibited similar reception characteristics, happened to fall off the table during prototyping of this model. About 60% of the 2MT's parts wound up in the BR24, which is actually a pretty good recycling rate! I took the model to Bricks By The Bay 2017, where it spent many hours pulling the Umbauwagen around BayLUG's display. It also won "Best Machine" in the "Scale Models" category: Thanks to anyone who came by to see it, and the rest of the display! Here's the full Brickshelf gallery, along with some Work-In-Progress pictures. I've also brought you some footage of the locomotive in action: Thank you for reading! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- One final note: Ben was one of the builders who had been active around the time I first started buidling Lego train MOCs -- so in a way, this model is an homage to him. A few of the design techniques used in this model are based on techniques in his models -- the hinges angling the sides of the cab, the 11-plate-diameter boiler, and the way the smoke deflectors are attached. If you're still out there in the hobby, Ben, thank you for inspiring me and a whole generation of builders.
  21. This was originally designed to be the smallest RC car to use a buggy motor, but it soon became an extremely powerful car capable of drifting. I refined the chassis design over 2 prototypes, and then tried multiple combinations of gear ratios and different sizes of wheels to achieve the best speed. The result: this MOC you are looking at right now! Driven by buggy motor, geared 1:1.25 Steered by PF servo Hidden power switch on underside LDcad/POV-Ray animation Video: http://bricksafe.com/files/mocbuild101/drift-racer-chassis/video.mpg Instructions: http://www.rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-8835/mocbuild101/2wd-drift-racer-chassis 3D File http://www.bricksafe.com/files/mocbuild101/drift-racer-chassis/2WD Drift Racer 3D file.mpd
  22. For the last 5+ years I have been running a train under my Christmas tree, powered by a LiIon PF battery box and double motors. I recently answered a question on Bricks.stackexchange.com where someone asked for advice on which power system to buy, and the answer I had to give surprised me so much, that I went ahead and changed my own strategy immediately as well. I am now the proud owner of an oval (16+ curves, 12 straights) with a L+R set of points of 9V track, including transformer, wall wart and power-to-rail connectors. Total cost were around $120, however, this is after deducting the going BL price for other train components that came with my purchase. If I didn't exclude those, my total would have been $190. (All US dollars). This prompted me to do a quick compare on the costs of a fully working train oval for under a Christmas tree. The Oval consists of 16 curves and at least 8 straights. The cost of whatever Christmas train you choose to run is not included: Powered UP: Battery Box: $50 at LEGO S@H, $35+shipping at BrickLink (only 1 US Seller) Motor: $14 at LEGO S@H Wheels & Axles: ~$3+shipping on BrickLink for 2 axles and 4 wheels Decorative sides: ~$2.50+shipping on BrickLink Tracks: 1 Track Pack (8 straights, 4 curves): $20 at LEGO S@H, $16 on sale occasionally at other stores; 12x Curved tracks: $6+shipping at BL or: Buy set 60197 ($160 at LEGO S@H, occasionally on sale for less at other stores (e.g. currently $128 at Target) plus 4x Straight track ($7+Shipping on BL) - used ones run about the same cost as the promo prices. Depending on how you count, this is $100-$160+tax for this setup, and you need to keep a mobile phone around (or pony up another $15 for the remote control), have to keep the connection alive, and will have to replace/recharge batteries every 2-3hrs. Power Functions: Battery Box: $13 on LEGO S@H ($15+shipping on BL), or the LiIon pack which has no US-based sellers currently neither on EBay nor BL, but should go for $100-$150 if available. IR Receiver: $10+shipping for a used one on BrickLink Decorative sides: ~$2.50+shipping on BrickLink Tracks: 1 Track Pack (8 straights, 4 curves): $20 at LEGO S@H, $16 on sale occasionally at other stores; 12x Curved tracks: $6+shipping at BL or: Buy a retired Power Function set (used) such as 60051, which with patience can be bought used, complete on EBay for $125-$150. You'd need extra straight track though (see Powered Up), which runs ~$7+Shipping. Again, depending on how you count, this is a $70-$150 purchase. Likely the cheapest option currently, until prices for Power Functions start skyrocketing once all components have officially retired. You get 2-3hrs run time, and unless you add $100 to your total for a LiIon battery box, you will need to buy rechargeable batteries and a charger (or cycle through alkaline AAA's like a madman). 9V: Get a used but working copy of 4561 ($100-$150 on EBay) Buy some extra straight track: 4*$5+shipping on BL (let's call it $25) Total: $125-$175 Suddenly the convenience of never having to change batteries or recharge with a $150 9V purchase sounds pretty attractive, doesn't it? Quite fascinating, for a product that has been discontinued for almost 15 years.
  23. Welcome to my garage LEGO!!! Hello! My name is Michael. I'm a Builder from Russia, I love muscle cars! Chevrolet K10 Silverado 1985 Description: - 2 L motor for drive - Servo motor for steering and steering wheel - 1 Small power supply ( Hot swap ) - Counterfeit engine under the hood (connected to motors) - Detailed interior - Doors, hood and trunk open - Swap body -4x4 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lego_muscle_garage/ Join my group in VK: https://vk.com/legomusclegarage All photos on the link: https://bricksafe.com/pages/Michael217/chevrolet-k10-silverado-1985-update Trailer: - Platform lift - Working ramps - Retractable front wheel
  24. Robust working 1:12 RC model of the 6x6 rocker-bogie mobility system used in Mars rovers Perseverance and Curiosity... Tons of play value. Works well over most neighborhood surfaces and terrains, but sometimes gets stuck in loose sand. What you put on top is up to you. NB: The NASA rovers are 6x6x4 platforms, with 6 wheels, all 6 driven, and the 4 corner wheels steered. At 1:12 scale, steering individual wheels with LEGO motors is out of the question. So this model is necessarily a 6x6x0 platform — but one with reasonably effective skid steering. Several years ago, made a pretty faithful working 1:12 model of Curiosity with more emphasis on visual realism than on mobility system performance. The current model vastly outperforms the old one... Purist alert: SBrick RC receiver, non-LEGO elastics used to suppress wheel spread.
  25. nikolyakov

    [MOC] - Power Plant 4

    Hi, I'm not sci-fi guy but I made a moc for our local lug's project. I hope you like it.