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Found 873 results

  1. Please comment, request and discuss about LDD new parts here Now this topic is intended as a support area for the LDD New Parts thread Ok, let's do this. Inspired by @M2m thread I've started wrting a 3D Studio Max script that allows importing, editing and exporting LDD brick geometry and their XML data. They are rough, some geometry data is unknown (this doesn't have any visible or noticable impact so far) but it works and here's the result (click for bigger pictures): Fixed connectivity issue of 90 deg tube (pretty popular piece for 2018/2019 technic sets): Custom 3x5x2 panel that I saw in one of the Chinese custom (not copied from Lego) models: I was curious how my MOC would look like with more realistic, narrow tires so I shrinked Unimog tire to fit on 42029 rim. Dimensions: 81,6 x 30: For the tractor enthusiasts - how could a Class tire look like on an Arcos rim - also that Chinese model. Dimensions: 64,2 x 20 (I've made is slighty bigger than original tire): Moved some parts around and fixed default orientation of some of technic panels:
  2. Hi, I went and tried to get custom parts but is using a different version of LDD. It did not show the Lego Company folder in Appdata/Roaming/ So what am I supposed to do? I am using LDD version 4.3.11.
  3. I'm just starting out with Lego Digital Designer and have run into a problem putting two gears together. In this LDD file (https://www.dropbox.com/s/d8i55l6dzzdupwl/GearTest.lxf?dl=0) I want to put the bevel gear on the grey beam so that it meshes with the other bevel gear, so it looks something like the image below.. But it won't let me do it, perhaps because one gear needs to be rotated. Any idea how this can be achieved?
  4. I propose to keep here an up-to-date ldraw.xml, the file used by LDD to convert to and from LDraw files. Download: latest version On Windows 32 bits: download and replace the one in “C:\Program Files\LEGO Company\LEGO Digital Designer\” On Windows 64 bits: download and replace the one in “C:\Program Files (x86)\LEGO Company\LEGO Digital Designer\” On Mac: download and replace the one in the “Contents\Resources\” folder in the app (open “Applications” in Finder, right click on the “LEGO Digital Designer” package and select the “Show Package Contents” option to explore the pakage folders). (Thanks manglegrat!) This file is also used and distributed with these tools: lxf2ldr C++/Qt version (both CLI and GUI), more options but needs to be compiled lxf2ldr.html HTML/JS version, works everywhere! If you have other modifications or additions, post them here or send me a personal message and I’ll include them to the benefit of all. If you need a part, feel free to ask here and I’ll try to add it (provided it exists in LDraw and LDD). History and Contents It’s based upon gallaghersart’s latest version (see this thread). It includes the modifications shutterfreak published in his thread. It uses some of the LDraw unofficial parts (mainly for new parts in LDD Brick version 2075). It includes some name corrections (because LDraw renamed or moved some parts, added new variants, etc.). I tried to more accurately convert the colors (now mainly according to Ryan Howerter’s conversion table). It’s not easy because all sources (Swooshable, Mecabricks, Ryan) don’t agree, and there are holes and overlaps. But as these differences, holes, and overlaps occur for rare colors or colors that aren’t available in LDD, it should be okay. In a megalomaniacal way, all the entries I have modified have an “SLS” at the end of their heading comments. New entries have an “SLS” at the front of the comments. So it’s easy to know when to blame me. As of 2016-09-16 and the big overhaul, I assume all the errors. Know Limitations As of LDD 4.3.9, flex parts (hoses) are not exported anymore (even unflexed). Minifig arms and hands are not connected in LDraw. I don’t know whose geometry is off (both?) but the shapes differ a lot. At least, hands are correctly connected to whatever they clip and arms are correctly placed in their sockets and somewhat wrap around the hands’s stems. Some variants are not recognized by LDD (e.g. clips, or tiles with/without groove, etc.) In those cases, I prefer to use the most recent variant in LDraw as it generally is easier to find and cheaper. Sometimes, several LDD parts correspond to a unique LDraw part. Sometimes, the transformation is accurate for one variant but not for another. For example, the Flag 2 x 2 is known to LDD as 2335, 11055, and 60779, but LDraw only has the 2335 variant. 2335 and 60779 use the same transformation but 11055 is vertically offset. I preferred to badly convert 11055 to 2335 rather than not convert it at all or badly convert 2335 and 60779. ldraw.xml is used both ways (LDD to/from LDraw). It’s not something I do frequently (too many resulting collisions) so it’s not well tested. One problem I can see is that, when several LDD parts correspond to a unique LDraw part, the conversion that’s listed last is the one that will be used. The reverse (first written is the one used) is true for assemblies that use the same subparts, in the same quantity (like electric cables). A lot of LDraw parts are simply wrong. Almost all the parts that combine System (studs and anti-studs) and Technic (pins and axles, and their holes) are wrong in that they assume the technic holes are at the same height than side studs (on the picture below, the circles are concentric). LDD assumes the holes are 0.2 mm (0.5 LDU) higher. In ABS, the holes are 0.12 mm (0.375 LDU) higher (dixit Jamie Berard in his famous presentation). In order to limit the number and magnitude of errors, LDD is considered to be right. How to write a new transformation for a part in ldraw.xml What? ldraw.xml is an XML file that defines how LDD can export to (or import from) LDraw files. It does so by defining a match between the part’s IDs and how to rotate and translate the part from one geometry to the other. Matches are defined by “Brick” XML elements. For example, this one says to LDD that the Brick 1x1 that it knows as 3005 is also known to LDraw as 3005: <Brick ldraw="3005.dat" lego="3005" /> (Note the “.dat” in the ldraw ID.) Matches are not needed if the part IDs are the same: the transformation element is sufficient for LDD to know the part exists. (So the example above is useless ) Rotations and translations are defined by “Transformation” XML elements. This one says to LDD that the Brick 1x1 just needs to be moved up: <Transformation ldraw="3005.dat" tx="0" ty="-.96" tz="0" ax="1" ay="0" az="0" angle="0" /> The translation (tx, ty, and tz) is in centimeters (0.8 cm is the width of a brick, 0.96 cm its height). The rotation is given by its axis (the line passing through and ), and its angle in radians. And all the coordinates are in the direct (“riht-handed”), Y points up, coordinates system of LDD. The transformation explains what should be done to import from LDraw besides changing the axes (LDD’s Y is up and XYZ is a direct basis, LDraw’s Y is down and XYZ is an indirect basis; so changing the axes only means changing the sign of Y). So, in an LDD to LDraw point of view, the transformation is reversed: it says what happens to a part if you don’t do anything to its coordinates besides changing the sign of Y. In other words, the opposite transformation has to be applied to the LDD coordinates of the part in order to get the LDraw coordinates (with Y reversed). Why? Each part has an orientation (which way up? which way left?) and a center, point of origin, or reference point (we’ll use “reference point” from now on). But LDD and LDraw don’t always agree. To know the orientation and reference point in LDD, insert the part without rotating it nor attaching it to any other part. It will be aligned along the scene’s axes (LDD’s axes). The reference point is near the mouse pointer’s head. To know the orientation and reference point in LDraw, I find LeoCAD the easiest tool: just select the part and its axes are drawn (X red, Y green, Z blue), starting at its reference point. Okay, LeoCAD’s «X, Y, Z» is LDraw’s «X, -Z, Y» but what’s another little change of basis? Sometimes, their disagreement is trivial. For example, for the simple 1x1 brick (3005), both LDD and LDraw agree: the stud is on top and the reference point is on the vertical line going through the center of the stud. But they differ for the height at which the reference point should be: LDD says it’s at the base of the brick, LDraw at its top (but at the base of the stud). (On every picture, X will be red, Y green, and Z blue.) So the transformation for that part is straightforward: if the LDraw part is imported as is, with only Y reversed, it will end up 0.96 cm (the height of the brick) higher than it should. So we have to lower it by 0.96 cm: <Transformation ldraw="3005.dat" tx="0" ty="-.96" tz="0" ax="1" ay="0" az="0" angle="0" /> Sometimes, their disagreement is more profound and the transformation is therefore more complicated. For example, for the musket (Minifig Gun Musket 2561), LDD puts the reference point in the handle and “up” means the handle is vertical but LDraw puts the reference point in the barrel and “up” means the barrel is vertical. Even more, the stock is on the wrong side, so X and Z are different too. With an identity transformation, the part is rotated by an eighth of a turn (X to Y) (π/4) around the Z axis to put the barrel vertical, and then by a quarter turn (X to Z) (-π/2) around the Y axis. After that, it has been translated up and horizontally. After calculations (see below), we’ll end up with this transformation: <Transformation ldraw="2561.dat" tx="0" ty="-1.72" tz="0.336" ax="-0.3574067443365933" ay="-0.8628562094610169" az="0.3574067443365933" angle="1.7177715174584016"/> How? So, how do we find the right values to have the correct transformations? What’s the ID? Having the right part Check the ID of the part in LDD. Check the ID of the part in LDraw. Beware of variants, LDraw uses a letter suffix (a, b, c…) where LDD totally changes the ID or keeps the same ID for new variants. Don’t hesitate to look on BrickLink for the part ID: BrickLink keeps a list of alternate IDs (when the same part has several IDs) and links to variants and notes. If the IDs are the same. Nothing to do. If the IDs differ. We add a Brick element: <Brick ldraw="123a.dat" lego="456" /> Don’t forget the “.dat”! That was the easy part. Which way is up? Finding the rotation axis and angle We start in LDD. Up is Y, or Y is up. X and Z are a bit harder to see on the LDD scene unless you use LDD’s developper mode (which has the LDD axes drawn at «0,0,0» as red X, green Y, and blue Z lines). Or, if you’re sure you didn’t move the camera in a brand new model/file, X is pointing bottom right, and Z bottom left. We place our part among other parts that we know will be correctly converted (like 1x1 plates, or harpoons ) to have references. Using different colors greatly helps! We export to LDraw… … and look at the results: We decompose the transformation in multiple simple rotations, around the X, Y, or Z axis. If it has been turned around X, a quarter turn from Y to Z is a positive π/2 angle. If it has been turned around Z, a quarter turn from X to Y is a positive π/2 angle. If it has been turned around Y, a quarter turn from Z to X is a positive π/2 angle. To make it short, it’s a direct (right-handed) basis. If you can’t figure out the problems with an existing transformation, “clear” it by using an identity transformation: <transformation tx="0" ty="0 tz="0" ax="0" ay="1" az="0 angle="0"/> (All zeroes but one of the a_ which is 1.) You can try each simple rotation one by one to be sure of their angles (especially their signs ). Beware, combining rotations change their axes (e.g. turning around first X then Y is equivalent to turning around first Y then Z). So if you check that the Y rotation is okay, then the X rotation, don’t forget to combine them as Y then Z. For the musket, we need two rotations: an eighth of a turn (π/4, 45°) around the Z (blue) axis that puts the barrel vertical, and then a quarter turn (-π/2, -90°) around the Y (green) axis. Or we can first make the quarter turn (-π/2, -90°) around the Y (green) axis, and then an eighth of a turn (π/4, 45°) around the X (red) axis. Remember, “import”-wise, we’re trying to find what should happen to the part in the LDD scene to be like the LDraw one, with the LDD axes (the harpoons ). My head is turning. Combining rotations If more than one simple rotation is needed, we have to combine them. For that, we’ll use quaternions. Eh come back! That’s not that difficult! A quaternion q can be written as q = a + b.i + c.j + d.k, where i² = j² = k² = i.j.k = -1 (so i.j = k = -j.i, j.k = i = -k.j, k.i = j = -i.k). a is the real part, b.i + c.j + d.k is the imaginary part. A rotation by the angle angle around the axis «ax, ay, az» is the quaternion q = cos(angle/2) + sin(angle/2).(ax.i + ay.j + az.k) Do note the 1/2 factor on the angle! To combine two rotations, we just multiply their quaternions and apply the rules above to end up with a a + b.i + c.j + d.k form (or, more accurately, a C + S.(ax.i + ay.j + az.k) form, where C and S are cosine and sine of the same angle and ax² + ay² + az² = 1 ). If we rotate first by q and then by p, the result is the rotation by p.q. Note the order: q then p is p.q. Multiplication is not commutative with quaternions: if you do it the wrong way, you’ll end up with the correct values but the wrong signs. There’re lots of fun to have with quaternions and rotations as quaternions. But what is said here is sufficient for our purposes. An example: Most of the times, we do π/2 rotations (quarter turns, 90°). angle = π/2 therefore cos(angle/2) = sin(angle/2) = cos(π/4) = sin(π/4) = √2/2; So, for a “horizontal” quarter turn (yaw, around Y): q = √2/2 + √2/2.j (as j/Y is the “vertical” axis). Let’s combine it with a half turn (π, 180°) around the X axis (IOW, upside-down): cos(π/2) = 0, sin(π/2) = 1, so p = 0 + i p.q = (0 + i) . (√2/2 + √2/2 j) = √2/2 i + √2/2 i.j = 0 + √2/2 ( i + k ) Now, let’s get the resulting angle: The real part of p.q, 0, is the cosine of angle/2. 0 is also the cosine of ±π/2 (±90°). Therefore, the resulting angle is π (180°). Now the axis, «ax, ay, az»: It’s the √2/2( i + k) imaginary part. That’s the vector «√2/2, 0, √2/2». We need to remove the sin(angle/2) factor. That’s easy as the sine of π/2 is 1. So our axis is «ax = √2/2, ay = 0, az = √2/2». Written in ldraw.xml: ax="0.707…" ay="0" az="0.707…" angle="3.1415…" Another one, a quarter turn around Y and then around X: q = √2/2 + √2/2 j = √2/2 (1 + j) p = √2/2 + √2/2 i = √2/2 (1 + i) p.q = 1/2 (1 + i) (1 + j) = 1/2 + 1/2 (i + j + k) We rewrite it as p.q = 1/2 + √3/2 (√⅓ i + √⅓ j + √⅓ k) to have a unit vector (ax² + ay² + az² = 1) in the parenthesis and to clarify the cosine and sine: 1/2 and √3/2. They are the sine and cosine of π/3 (60°). Therefore, the resulting angle is 2π/3 (120°). In ldraw.xml: ax="0.577…" ay="0.577…" az="0.577…" angle="2.094…" Back to our musket: An eighth of a turn (π/4, 45°) around the Z axis that puts the barrel vertical: q = cos(π/8) + sin(π/8).i = C + S.k Then a quarter turn (-π/2, -90°) around the Y axis: p = cos(-π/4) + sin(-π/4).j = √2/2 (1 - j) p.q = √2/2.(1 - j)(C + S.k) = √2/2.(C - S.j.k - C.j + S.k) = √2/2.C + (-√2/2.S.i - √2/2.C.j + √2/2.S.k) Wow! Hum, okay. So √2/2.cos(-π/8) is the cosine of half our angle. Get the calculator out… angle/2 = Acos(√2/2.cos(-π/8)) = 0.8589 Our angle is 1.7178. We “remove” the sine of angle/2 from our vector, so that p.q = cos(angle/2) + sin(angle/2).(ax.i + ay.j + az.k): ax = -√2/2.sin(-π/8) / sin(0.8589) = -0.3574 ay = -√2/2.cos(-π/8) / sin(0.8589) = -0.8629 az = √2/2.sin(-π/8) / sin(0.8589) = 0.3574 As an exercise, you can verify that ax² + ay² + az² = 1. So we did it right! Et voilà: ax="-0.3574067443365933" ay="-0.8628562094610169" az="0.3574067443365933" angle="1.7177715174584016" One step to the left. Getting the translation right Now that the part is correctly oriented, it may need to be moved. The translation is in centimeters (cm). 20 LDU = 0.8 cm. Values are often multiples of 0.4 (half a stud) for tx and tz and multiples of 0.32 (height of a plate) for ty. Other, finer, tunings are often in multiples of 0.008. If the rotation is complex, all bets are off In LDD, we try to place the part so that its LDraw up axis ends up up in the scene, and we try to align its LDraw X and Z axes with X and Z of the scene (at least, that it is not rotated by a weird angle). That way, moving the part along its axes is also moving the part along the scene’s axes. It will be easier for getting the translation right. For our musket, that means the barrel up. (I didn’t align the X and Z axes here because, yeah, I’m a warrior, I don’t need that. Besides, you’ll see what happens because of that. ) Again, I find it easier in LeoCAD: the key bindings, the coordinates clearly shown in the status bar, etc. The thing is, LeoCAD uses a direct Z up basis. So if you move «dx, dy, dz» in LeoCAD, you’re moving «dx, -dz, dy» in LDD (and vice versa). Confusing? Noooh. Anyway, choose your own poison but beware of its little quirks. To help fine tuning, using transparent colors greatly helps, especially for clip-bar connections. Now, we note the coordinates of our part in our LDraw editor and move it so that it ends up the way it should. We look how much we moved it. That’s it! Just convert it to cm (= LDU × 0.8 / 20) and we have our translation. Well, mostly, the signs are wrong. Remember: the transformation is what should happen to the LDD part to end up like the LDraw part, we just did the opposite and moved the LDraw part to be like the LDD one. Besides the signs, if you didn’t correctly align the axes, you’ll have to find which is which For our musket, we need to go up and sligthly to the “left” (from bottom right to upper left when your LDraw view is oriented as a new LDD file, as are all the screenshots here). That means negative dy and dx. But as the part is not aligned on X and Z (but still not badly rotated), the negative dx becomes a positive dz. Et voilà! <Transformation ldraw="2561.dat" tx="0" ty="-1.72" tz="0.336" ax="-0.3574067443365933" ay="-0.8628562094610169" az="0.3574067443365933" angle="1.7177715174584016"/> (So, okay. I had to try first tx then tz, both negative and positive, before I found the right one. But I didn’t want to have to remake the pictures! There: I’m not a warrior, I’m just lazy.)
  5. Can I get them by anyway? I tried with importing from sets but it didn'twork out. I could do with part designer if I had decals but I don't know where to find them.
  6. RoxYourBlox

    [MOC] Fiesta Balloon

    Fiesta Balloon soars above Lego city! To contribute to Eurobricks' airship collaboration at Brickworld Virtual Halloween 2020, I swapped the color palette of Harley's Balloon with rainbow colors spiraling around to emulate the more vibrant patchwork pattern you might typically see in the sky. Its name refers to the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, which I would someday like to attend after our pandemic is over. Stunningly hollow thanks to a dome technique refined over 10 years, the balloon can rest on its gondola or float from a technic beam installed at the apex. My previous technic balloon skeleton has been strengthened with #24121 11x11 quarter technic gear racks to beef up stability and allow access inside the top or bottom hemispheres by removing the equatorial plates. An optional reversible handle can be mounted inside the hole at the top to carry or hang it.
  7. HMSS Kristján [BD-45]"Aðmíráll-class" Coastal Defense Monitor Royal Svallbjardian Navy Commissioned February 1939, launched June 1940.Armament as Launched:Two dual high-angle fifteen-inch main guns with an effective range of 30,000 meters.Four 3.5-inch secondary-defense guns.Six 20mm anti-air mounts.Three dual 40mm anti-air mounts.Three five-inch dual HA/DP anti-ship/anti-air guns. One Aviastar AR-350 scout seaplane.General Information:Top Speed 22.3 Knots. Compliment of 450. An operational range of over 6,000 kilometers. The HMSS Kristján was an Aðmíráll-class Monitor built-in 1940 to protect and patrol the expansive water borders of Svallbjard. Designed to defend against both air and ship targets, the Kristján was well-armed with two dual 15-inch high-angle turrets and three dual five-inch dual-purpose guns. In addition to this primary armament, the warship also carried various 20mm single AA guns and four three-inch ship defense guns. With a seaplane launch, Kristján was very effective as a reconnaissance vessel and supported Arctic exploration operations and winter joint-training operations. She also held a fairly speedy top speed of 22.3 knots, allowing her to hastily change location and keep up with supporting ships easily. Throughout her career, which spanned 23 years, Kristján outperformed most of her foreign counterparts. She never sunk a hostile warship, yet did participate in many joint-exercises. She was widely regarded as one of the most modern Coastal Defense Ships when she was launched and was well-loved by her crew. Serving in the navy well into the 1960s, Kristján was the final Coastal Defense Monitor to ever serve in a modern navy and her retirement was bittersweet for those who had spent time on or around her. Alas, the days of slow floating bunkers were over, and Svallbjard was looking to the future of anti-ship missiles and guided-missile destroyers. After serving for 23 years, Kristján was transferred to Tórshavn, where she became the second museum ship in the fleet since the founding of the navy. She stands there today, her imposing superstructure and mast inviting young guests to explore her many decks and corridors. Since the first crew was assigned to Kristján, the departing complement would sign the bridge, welcoming the new blood to the family. The signatures, although faded, still sit in the bridge, protected by a layer of plexiglass. HUGE HUGE HUGE THANKS to Admiral_Plackbar for sacrificing his CPU to allow me to do this render. The muzzle-flashes and water base were made by him, the ship and the editing were done by me. First time doing this, I am absolutely going to do it again. All built in Stud.io.
  8. Xon67

    Assembling Bricksburg

    edited to put all final images in the first post... After seeing the LEGO movie, I wanted to re-create buildings from Emmet's neighborhood. While researching, I realized a great deal of what was in the movie was based on previously-existing sets. I thought it would be interesting to do a project that compared the original LEGO sets to the modified movie versions. Knowing how much time, money, and physical space it would take to build these out of real bricks, I decided to try my hand at LEGO Digital Designer (LDD). After having created a couple of the buildings in LDD, I ran across the post for Bluerender and used it to generate photo-real renderings. Here are my results: .lxf file: http://www.brickshel...logo_final_.lxf The latest image posts: "I wanna go home!" LEGO Movie 2 logo The latest WIP of Emmet's Mech (with BlackStar): .lxf file: http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/Xon67/Movie/movie_emmetsmech_2017-07-20.lxf Emmet's apartment Emmet's apartment interior How Emmet fits a 50-stud-wide apartment into a 30-stud-wide building: A variation on Emmet's apartment (green with a slanted roof) Pet Store (right) Pet Store (left) Plumber Joe's apartment .lxf file: http://www.brickshel...the_plumber.lxf Condemned building Fresh Fruit market Sherrie Scratchen-Post's apartment Emmet's street Emmet's street in micro scale Fire Brigade .lxf file: http://www.brickshel...ire_brigade.lxf Fire Brigade Tower (updated) Filling Station Garage Street Corner Rooftop garden 1 Rooftop garden 2 An example of the reuse of building parts Warehouse 1 Warehouse 2 (Fire Brigade) Mega Green Grocer Bricksburg Castle Bricksburg Castle back Cafe Corner / hotel with clock tower Fish (market?/restaurant?) Office(?) Building Office Building Church It's not mentioned in the images, but the the ice cream cart in this image, the giant Green Grocer, and the "fish" building comes from 10211 Grand Emporium. Cheese Slope building Fire Brigade Radio Station Plaza with Bob's Kabobs Here are some Bricksburg accessories from the Movie, including garbage containers, rooftop details, a street corner, billboards, and the mosaics from the "fish" and "fresh fruit" buildings, including the LDD file, for you to use in your own MOCs: lxf file: http://www.brickshel...accessories.lxf Condemned building Condemned building Ma and Pa Cop's house Highway Overpass Train bridge Monorail stop .lxf file: http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/Xon67/Movie/_movie_train_stop_stairs_alt3.lxf Downtown plaza Skyscraper ground level The Coffee Chain .lxf file: http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/Xon67/Movie/movie_coffee_chain.lxf Downtown Bricksburg and the Kragle antidote. Skyscraper 1 Skyscraper 2 Skyscraper 3 Skyscraper 4 Skyscraper 5 Skyscraper 6 Skyscraper 7 Downtown: Flying cranes Downtown: Larry's flying coffee machine Skyscraper under construction 1 Skyscraper under construction 2 Construction site Construction Site Update: Small cement mixer Tipper Truck Cement mixer Dump Truck Crawler Crane Instruction Tube Large crawler crane Instruction Holder Building cranes Building crane Construction helicrane Brick sorter Front end loader Back hoe Heavy loader Emmet's mech Emmet's mech compared to the official set Rush hour traffic Small car Public transportation, monorail, and Surfer Dave's car SUV Small van Delivery truck Police cruiser SWAT van Octan HQ micro scale upper floors Octan HQ micro scale Octan HQ from Finn's basement Octan HQ minifig scale Octan reception: Lord Business' relic room Octan corridor with MetalBeard and Benny Octan sound stage--news conference stage Octan sound stage--80s-something technology Octan sound stage--Where Are My Pants? Octan offices. Octan Control Room. Octan DJ booth Octan Executive Conference Room Lord Business' ThinkTank Octan flying cube. The many moods of MetalBeard MetalBeard's strong, virile body MetalBeard's "Down on the Farm" form Mrs. Scratchen-Post's kitty sled lxf file: http://www.brickshel...post_sleigh.lxf A Christmas tree assembled by The LEGO Movie Master Builders Emmet's snow sculpture A surprise Christmas tree for Bad Cop Nathan Sawaya's Oscar statue from the 2015 Academy Awards. Mark Mothersbaugh's LEGO energy domes from the 2015 Academy Awards Awards given to all Emmet Awards nominees End Title Concept End credits: Movie Theater End credits: WyldStyle's tag End credits: Music End credits: Movie premiere End credits: Kragle End credits: Taco Tuesday End credits: Consessions End credits: Secret Police End credits: Sound stage End credits: Construction End credits: Warehouse More on the way!
  9. [Rules of the Topic] [Statistics] - - - - - - - - - - [Not Indexed Yet Entries] [Themes A-C] - - - - [Themes D-M] - - - - [Themes N-S] - - - - [Themes T-Z] [Begin of the entries] - - - - - - - - - - [Last Update Point] Rules of the Topic (Please read these guidelines before posting) Here are some guidelines created in order to help to maintain this topic well ordered and help to built the index! Allowed Sets Set that has been officially released by LEGO and available for the purchase. Set whose Official Instructions has been released from TLG and are available in LEGO website. IMPORTANT NOTE: if building instructions or set's references are not easily available on common sources, please report that. The Set have to be constructed using official LEGO instructions and not interpreting preliminary or official images. The Set have to contain something you can build. Sets with scattered parts or single or few minifigures are not allowed. 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Images should be simple and clear: no "creative" images are allowed, but simple screenshots. Avoid compositions (more images in one), images with another image as background, animated images, 3D images, renderings with external software, image with custom added parts, etc... Try to place objects inside the image so that the image results compact (i.e. avoid internal large blank space if possible) but clear. Try to place the camera so that the set results well visible. Avoid flat framing but choose a good 3D angle. As images are for preview purpose only, should be not too big! Maximum size allowed is 512x512 pixels for big sets (such as castles, modular buildings, stations, large space ships, etc...). Use intermediate sizes (for example 448px, 384px, 320px, ...) for smaller models. The 256x256px size or lower is often good for small sets. Crop images completely removing horizontal and vertical blank stripes around the subject (zero-pixles margins). Insert a model Report set's data and emphasize that in bold. Set's data include set Number, set official Name and set's Theme and subtheme if any. For example: 5988 - Pharaoh's Forbidden Ruins - Theme: Adventure If the set has more "configurations" (different models), please specify which one you are reproducing with LDD (Model A, Model B, etc...). NOTE: Alternate Versions (official different configurations for the same set) are counted as separate sets. If the set has been Re-Released with an identical or similar version, report the alternate Set ID(s). Report both the version of LDD and the brickset used to build the model. Insert a screenshot of your creation, in order to provide a preview. One screenshot for each set (see the rules about images above). Write an Error List, reporting if the model is complete or some element is missing or replaced (by a similar part, a brick assembly or any custom solution). Use part IDs to identify the bricks. Don't divide a single set in more than one post. Put a single set in a single .lxf file. You are encouraged to use LDD groups function to separate different elements in complex sets. LDD model should be similar to the original model as much as possible. Include minifigs, if any. Replace missing decorations with suitable ones, if possible. Modified models are welcome, but in different .lxf files, as an "extra". Every personalization (personal logos, additions, changes) makes a model a "Modified Model". and obviously... Share you lxf file! Update a set Update the post where you originally inserted the set. Report the update in the Upgrade Topic. Be care to follow the rules of the Upgrade Topic. [Sets created by other users] Book or Request a set Refer to "Official Lego sets - Book, WIP, Requests" Topic. NOTE: you can ever choose to make an already made or booked set, if you want. Besides You are encouraged to inform an LDD file maker if you notice an adjustable defect in his/her LDD file! If you notice something wrong in the index, please report it to the indexer. If you use custom pieces to replace missing bricks in LDD, please post it in the "LDD custom bricks" Topic! Rules in brief Read the rules before posting here. Only regular entries will be indexed. Allowed sets: instructions officially released, no spared parts. Report references if necessary. Insert a model General rules: don't split model in more posts, don't add or remove entries to an existing post, group entries. Don't add personalizations to the model (except in order to replace missing parts). Use Groups. Extra are allowed, as text links. Necessary content: Set's Data, Image, LXF File, Error List. - Set's data: Set's ID, Set's name, Theme/Subtheme, alternative model (Model A, B, ...), alternative Set IDs if any. - Image: one for each set, simple screenshots, PNG with Alpha channel, maximum size 512x (big sets), crop (zero-pixles margins), not scattered, no flat view. - LXF file: one for each entry, direct link, report LDD and brickset version. - Error List: missing bricks/decorations, replaced brick/decorations, brick made replacements. Use part IDs. Various: minimal quotes, don't quote images, report errors. (index/other entries).
  10. Recently upgraded to Windows 10 and re-installed LDD. After resolving an unrelated error having to do with my graphics card, I succeeded in booting up the program and opened one of my old build files to discover that an incredibly large number of bricks (mostly ones with moving parts) were refusing to load. Additionally, three of the brick categories in the sidebar were displaying with a bugged icon and a handful more, including hats, heads, and handheld props, were missing entirely. Finally, numerous bricks from these and other categories has been randomly redistributed to incorrect categories, as seen in the minifig parts catagory here. I haven't yet determined whether all of the parts from the missing categories are still present. What's going on, and how do I fix it? I've already tried all the solutions in this thread, in the belief that it was about the same issue I'm experiencing, but in retrospect it's very likely that it isn't.
  11. I couldn't find one, so i'm looking to create a thread for "custom" lego stickers (and by custom i mean stickers on pieces other than their intended one.) I made a custom pallete of these, and thought it would be useful for others. Keep in mind, this was originally intended for personal use so some pieces may seem obsolete. But here it is anyway! If anybody else has any to share, feel free to post! LDD "Custom" Stickers Some Examples
  12. So I recently got a new computer, which necessitated upgrading to Windows 10. I was able to find workarounds for most of the annoyances that caused (as evidenced by the Windows 7 style taskbar in the image below), but when I installed LDD and tried to launch it, it came out looking like this: Crazy scanlines all over the place, and an error message I can't read. You can't really tell in this picture, because it's been shrunk, but each line is only about one pixel in width, they're just grouped together real close in places. The lines stay there when I actually open the build editor. They seem to be in a fixed pattern rather than appearing randomly or moving around. As far as I can tell, the program seems to function more or less normally, but I can't see 90% of what's happening on the screen. I can't even tell if the font is displaying normally or not. I've already tried reinstalling it and repairing the installation, but the problem persists. What is happening, and how do I fix it?
  13. This time, I decided to try building something that I have only ever seen one other MOC of. The J-1 Semi-Autonomous Proton Cannon. This thing has a very unique shape, and some fiddly limbs. I did a fair bit of physical brick building to figure out how I could do the legs, I'm happy with what I came up with. The legs can support a reasonable amount of weight, but overall I think this thing would need a stand to help support it. Anyways, here is what I came up with. A side view. The 3mm tubing is a little funky, but given how tricky is is to bend them in Stud.io I think it is a decent approximation. A comparison to 7869, and to my Delta-7b And action shot for fun.
  14. This is my MOC of the rebel base at Yavin IV based on A New Hope, Rogue One and Star Wars Rebels. I tried to make so that it could possibly be made as an actual LEGO set so it's one section out of four to keep the piece count at around 2,000 pieces and the price as low as possible at this size, and so the exterior can be exhibited and the interior can be accessed to at the same time. The set has 4 different sections, each one based on a different area of the base seen in the movies and the TV series. The first one is the hangar where the ships are fixed and get ready for battles, the second one is the war room where the rebel leaders meet and follow the state of the battles, the third one is the room where the rebel pilots were taught how to destroy the Death Star, and the fourth one is the ceremony room where the heroes of the Battle of Yavin got their medals. I made the set on LDD and rendered it with POV-ray. I've made a list of minifigs that I think should be included with the set and I'm finishing making the illustrations for them since some of them are new so I'll post them too when they are done! Feel free to ask any questions about the moc or leave any comments or critiques about it!
  15. Before you read any further: I want to give massive credits to RenegadeClone (or his brother.. or both.. it's confusing) for coming up with this great MOC and leaving enough instructions for me to reconstruct the model. My version is 90-95% the same and I can only take credit for making the model and some small differences in detail (I'll get to those later). RenegadeClone's done a great job. You can find the original topic here. Having said that, things are easier to build when you have an LDD file. A small introduction I'm Krispy. I've been lurking here for a while, taking in ideas and techniques. Now that I've started building again, I figured it's good to share. I'm a big fan of Star Wars universe starfighters, but only the classic trilogy and the stuff after that. I love space sims and "Tie-Fighter" in particular; I've wasted half my childhood on that game . And now I've decided to collect Lego version of the starfighters from that universe. In minifig-scale. I was a little bummed out that TLG doesn't have a proper B-Wing set. Bummed out until I found RenegadeClone's MOC. The Model B-Wing v1.1 by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr There she is, rendered using LDD2PovRay. Total part count: 951. Ouch. There are small differences with the RenegadeClone's original; most concern the cockpit: The cockpit is all light bley; this meant using some different parts The rear cockpit section (with the curved slopes) is completely different in internal construction. The slopes are now attached using 3 stubs making the use of rubber bands unnecessary (I dislike rubber bands). The pilot now has a seat (in dark green!). Flying a B-Wing is tough enough without the physical discomfort.... or so they say. The internal structure of the main wing and the engines is different. I only knew the outside dimensions, so I had to reconstruct them on my own. Internally this B-Wing is probably rather different. Below you will find all the files you need to source the parts and make the model. The LDD model is made using LDD 4.3.5. The partslist spreadsheets was made using LDD Manager, but I've added some extra columns to keep track of the parts that you have ("Have" column) so you can see which bricks you still need. For those of you who don't do LDD, I've exported the instruction to html and put them in a zip; they should work on any browser. The Files The LDD file: v1.0 / v1.1 Partslist (v1.0): XLSX (office 2010) / ODS (openoffice) Building instructions in html (v1.0): link LDD file of the display stand: link If you want to figure it all out yourself, stop reading and start building. Below I've posted some notes on sourcing the parts and building the model that you may find useful though. Sourcing the parts Please note that there are a small number of rare-ish parts used in the model, so check if you have these or are able to order them before you start your Bricklink frenzy: Large hard plastic wheel in classic grey Wedge 4 x 4 (Slope 18 Corner) in light bley; you'll need 4 Most parts in sand blue 4L bar in dark grey/dark bley; dark grey shouldn't be too hard, but dark bley is rarer 8.5L Hose in classic grey Also note that if you need to source almost all parts (like me; my lego is older, so I only have classic grey), this beast will set you back considerably. It has almost 1000 parts. By my estimation I've spend somewhere between €100 and €120 on parts (about $125 to $140). It's not cheap. If you use LDD Manager to check if you can do other colours instead of sand blue, you will only find a small number of basic colours. This is due to this brick. If you want to know what your real options are, paint this brick black in the model. If you are having trouble sourcing sand blue parts (I'm looking at you fellow europeans), dark bley offers a good alternative though your model will look more like the UCS B-Wing that way. Building considerations It's possible to build this model using the LDD generated instructions. I've done so, proving they actually work, but they are a bit weird and unlogical. The LDD model has been grouped in to logical groups, so you might want to check those. As reference, I've rendered a picture showing these elements. Minifig-scale B-Wing v1.0 in parts by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr Below I will note some things you want to look out for. Engine covers by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr Build these engine covers seperate and add them to the model later (after step 180 or something). Engine (build this first) by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr That means you want to build this engine part first. Exhaust close-up by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr Note that the technics half pins do not go in all the way. That's not a bad thing though: you now have the option to add a 2x2 dish giving your exhaust the same look as the offical TLG sets (eg. the 9493 X-Wing). Technics tubing not in instructions by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr Note that this piece of pneumatic tubing is not on the LDD model. The holders are though; look at the completed model (all the way below) to see where it slots between the two torpedo launchers. Fix for curved plate problem by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr I had a problem with the narrow 1 stud wide cover plate for the rear of the main wing: it curved outwards (to the left in this picture) because a 1x12 plate I used wasn't straight!! Using this modification at the bottom of the assembly, I was able to hold it in place. Cockpit axle mount thingy in place by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr Notice that I used old school connectors with studs on the side. This means the model is a bit sturdier on top (also I have, like, tons of these parts). Cockpit section by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr Cockpit with seat. Notice that the headrest has two 1x1 dark bley plates instead of one in the LDD model. This depends on what helmet your minifig pilot is wearing. Build complete! by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr Build complete! It's big, it's heavy. If anyone has suggestions on a stand that works for this beast, I'm all ears. I hope you've enjoyed this little write-up. Good luck and happy building if you're going to attempt one... trust me, they are worth the effort: the build was definitely one of the most challenging I've done so far! update 13-01-2013: A stand I've updated the files section with a LDD model of the stand I came up with (see picture below). It's bulky, but sturdy and allows you to show off the model with open s-foils! Stand - front by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr update 19-01-2013: version 1.1 I've updated the model to 1.1. Grab the new model file from the files section above! What is different you may ask? Well, there's somewhat less studs on the outside of the model. Oh... and the lower part of the internal skeleton has been redone completely. It definitely feels more rigid now. Check out the differences below! Even if you don't want to update your model with loads of tiles, I would recommend redoing the skeleton. B-Wing v1.1 Skeleton update by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr
  16. Hi guys, so what happened was that I accidentally build a BRAND NEW EF76 Nebulon B Medical Frigate! (It is ok if you skip past all the text and jump straight to the pictures below :) ) A rainy Saturday afternoon in December, I decided to put my old Nebulon model back together after it had been displayed at AFOLCon. Since I had to build the entire thing again, I thought it would be fun to see if I could improve it in some way and update the design. Thus I revisited the modelermagic.com site I had used the first time I designed the model. They have 200+ pictures of the model used in the movie. The model was one of the last finished models created for the Empire Strikes Back back in 1980. As with most ILM models it was made from a wonderful cocktail of kit-bashed and custom-made parts. If you look closely at the studio model, you can find old model kit parts – warship hulls, rockets, racecar fenders, engines of all sorts, and different kinds of weaponry. Even the frames used to hold the different kit parts have found their purpose. Back when I was building the old version of the ship I even found some guys trying to recreate the studio model – identifying the old model kits parts and all, a few years later the guy is still at it! But I digress… Looking at the pictures again I got a few ideas for modifications and extra details. But, more importantly, it somehow looked like the front half maybe needed to be… bigger?? I knew that the official 300m length and 72m width of the ship did NOT fit the proportions of the studio model. I had taken that into account when building the first version of the ship – where I repeatedly had to redesign the entire front again and again to hit the correct proportions. But looking at the pictures with fresh eyes it still looked “off” from certain angles. However, I couldn’t pinpoint how much exactly needed to be done… Until, I found the Empire Strikes Back BlueRay! On the BlueRay there were additional pictures AND a video of the movie model rotating. The goals were (as always) to get the proportions and details of the ship as accurate as possible. And, using the BlueRay material, I discovered that the entire front needed to be MUCH bigger than before to be accurate. Thus, a brand new design process began. During this process I built an entirely new front half of the ship with a ton of new features, which made the old model look, well, like a model. When that was done I began tweaking and rebuilding the rest of the ship; the neck, the back sections, the aft Deflector Control tower, the engine detailing, etc. etc.. Even the mini Falcon needed to be changed to another model entirely to fit with the larger construction. In the end I had built a brand new model! When designing the old model I had been pretty uncompromising when it came to angles of the ship. I wanted to get everything as close to the movie model as possible and not just having either straight or 45degree angles - this mantra has continued with the new model. This meant there were no easy solutions to make most of these angles. The “off” angles combined with all the specific detailing resulted in the original ship ending up using more than 450 types of bricks. This was also due to the discrete coloring found in the movie model, which I tried to replicate. Due to the much increased size of the new model it can afford much greater detailing – especially the front half, which was way too small before, is now infinitely more detailed compared. As I had originally done with the engine section, I could now begin to interpret every little piece of detailing on the front of the studio model. This also means that the brick type count with the new model has gone past 500 – and the ship is now several thousand bricks larger than before. Enjoy! This ship has a ton of detail and sections so I have tried sorting the pictures a bit – beginning with the front. The Front The Medical Frigate is a very “forward heavy” model. The entire front section takes up nearly half of the models total length (and much than half of the bricks). The front section has several defining features: The huge dark water tank, the antenna arrays and the dominating “stalactite” housing numerous smaller pods. The water tanks sports a lot of piping - but also a lonely canon (AKA a dbg 6246a screwdriver :) ). The Stalactite was one of my favorite areas designing the first model. However the increased size has allowed me to have details not possible before. Each section is like designing its own separate model. My way of working was to think of each "pod" as a separate, detailed smaller ship – which actually fits with the lore of these pods being interchangeable. I also like the haphazard cover plates encapsulating the pods. Some of the plating seems almost to float in space. This angle also reveals some of the several, otherwise hidden, viewports of the ship. Each part of the ship is designed as if it were a separate micro model. Just like trying to make the scale Falcon as precise as possible (Thanks Tim) each section is built for optimal detail. For comparison is a picture of the studio model in the same area below: Here the dirty, used look of the model along with the subtle splashes of color is evident. These are features I have tried to recreate in the design of the model. Before we move on here is a shot of the top of the front. The short-range communications array is in focus. I have always been curious as to what the purpose of the grilled area is? The Middle The area where the front section meets the neck is where we find the medical bay. Here is the iconic window where Leia and Luke watch the Falcon depart with Chewie and Lando in the search for Han. Getting the shape of the window correct was a challenge when using plates and tiles for the plating. I did a test using a “brick wall” approach, which made it easier to get the desired shape of the window, but forewent the nice texturing afforded by the lines between the tiles of different shapes and sizes. Just now writing this post I got an idea. Looking at the window in the picture above I decided I could clean it up a bit, but also set in the proper picture of Luke, Leia and the droids (the picture was found in the aforementioned post). This only goes to show that no Lego model is ever truly done :) (too bad I delivered back the good camera so this picture is taken with my phone ><). And now I got an idea for my next moc – I will build this medical-bay-window-scene in minifig scale, put in the minifigs, take a picture and place it in this window frame – it is the Lego way! :D The Falcon. In scale with the Medical Frigate, docked as seen in ESB. The excellent design is thanks to Tim Goddard. I have updated it a bit with a new cockpit section and a few other modifications. The Falcon is attached to the “Docking Neck” which is detailed below. The docking neck up close. Loads of piping, but also a few slopes thrown in to approximate the not quite round, but not quite square, shape of the studio model. The detailing continues all the way around – even under the neck. This was the only place I did not detail on the old model, but this time around it has gotten the proper treatment. Connecting front and back. Getting the Falcon to hang on properly and NOT fall down was "fun". Looking at the film shot it is actually docked in the exhaust vent right under the turret (which also makes little sense). Trying to getting it to hang in that area meant that it was too off the center of gravity and I would need a seperate stand for the Falcon. Or I could revert to the smaller, lighter version used in the old version. I am still considering a solution :) The Back The back section’s main features are the engines, the static discharge vanes and the Deflector Control tower. However, there are also plenty of more subtle features to pique the imagination. This angle shows off the details of the Deflector Control tower nicely, but it also reveals some detailing not seen from the angles shown on film. I have found no description on what the pipes are meant to be, but they look interesting and are part of the section of the model labeled Engineering. There is also a row of holes in the model here, which I suspect should be windows. However, on the studio model they are not covered with the kind of film the other windows are. Maybe it is an omission or maybe the holes serves a different purpose – in any case I have recreated them here. The static discharge vanes are also prominent in this picture. They must serve their purpose in atmosphere or perhaps more gaseous parts of space – perhaps inside a nebula eh? :P Here is the opposite side of the same area. Although the model is overall symmetrical, the different detailing techniques of the modelers working on different parts of the model is evident when looking at the studio model. I have tried to interpret the different styles using bricks :) Now to the juicy stuff – the engines. The engine section of the studio model sports an obscene amount of detail. Dozens and dozens of plates, placed in an intricate system. Looking at this section on the studio model from different angles continuously reveal new details. Just as you thought you had the look nailed, a new picture reveals plates jutting further out than expected or until then hidden nuances. This is why another picture of the exact same area, but from a slightly different angle, is needed. Looking at the engines from different perspectives also revealed that they are placed at slightly different “depths”. In general I had to revisit this area quite a few times because nothing lines up as neatly as initially expected. Even though it can look like it, the sides of the engine section does not slope at exactly 45 degrees – which makes recreating it that much more troublesome. Another perspective. The deflector control tower has a weird air intake looking thing at the top. The “Dark Side” The starboard side of the ship is not really shown up close in either ESB or RotJ. The main reason for this is that this is the side where the model was mounted to a large steel frame for shooting. The side sports a lot of unique detailing, as also seen on the back section. When looking at the starboard side of the stalactite, several unique features stands out compared to the port side. I have tried to recreate all these features, but I have also improvised a bit of additional detailing because this side was somewhat barer. Looking at the green command module there were no windows on this side and some weird plating. This lead me to believe that at some point the modelers had to prioritize their time to get the model done - and stuff that would not be seen in the movie suddenly became less important to flesh out. Thus I have taken a few liberties with this side. I recreated all the unique features, but I also added detail. For example the starboard windows to the command module – only having windows on one side struck me as weird. Since the other side of the same module had piping and cylinders I added a bit of those here as well – without mirroring anything, because no mirroring is to be found anywhere else on the model. I did more or less the same with the tan module adding some detail to compliment the opposite side. However, I have tried to make my own detailing subtle enough as to not take focus from the unique features found here. All in all, this side is a bit more of a playground compared to the rest of the model where every area is exquisitely detailed. The more modest texturing here begs for continued tinkering :) Heading into Hyperspace! The Nebulon B - ready to jump to lightspeed! Overview On the shelf. The model is done for now, but a model is always a work in progress. I am always tweaking here and there. I have already made a few modifications since these pictures were taken – I will keep you updated here :) I got a lot of builders asking to send them LDD of my old model. Well, I have good news. I will be making (not me personally) instructions for this if anyone is interested. When they are done the will be available alongside the LDD, Excel Sheet with the bricks needed and an XLM wanted list to upload to Bricklink :) And yes, it is swooshable! Please comment! Go here for updates to the design and instructions: http://www.eurobrick...howtopic=131170 UPDATE:
  17. update 2013-07-30 I've finally managed to brick build it! I've included some studio shots below. Also there's a little pointer on getting the angle of the cones to work. Finally, I've also updated the model file, as I found some errors in the 1.2 version. ---------------- I've been taking a break from building, but there was one model I haven't yet posted. I was going to do a topic after I brick-build it, but seeing as that might take awhile, I've decided to post the model file anyway. Also someone has already brick built it using my model file; I'm fairly confident that this model will work in real bricks. Disclaimer Like the B-Wing, most of the modeling was done by others, mainly Jerac and Scott34567. I've merely modified the base model to take full advantage of the parts from TLG's #75003 A-Wing model. Also some optimizations were made. So, without further ado: here she is! Studio shot 1 by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr Studio shot 2 by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr Jerac/Scott A-wing - v1.2 by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr Jerac/Scott A-wing - v1.2: Lego®-Vision by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr You can find the LDD model file here: v1.4 Building tip: inserting a pneumatic T between the cones and the round brick helps the side to keep its shape. How to angle the cones by Krispy's brick stuff, on Flickr Happy building!
  18. Hey everyone, hope everyone has been doing well. I've been busy working away at expanding my minifig scale MOC collection (Still only digitally atm). And thought I'd bring you something that I haven't really seen around anywhere. A minifig scale Hyena-class Bomber. This one was pretty tricky, but I think it came together rather well in the end. The official LEGO Hyena bomber was alright, but left a lot to be desired. The overall shaping of the ship was kind of off and the walking mode looked nothing like the source material. My goal was to get mine as close as I could and keep it in line with my other minifig scale builds. This was a little harder than I had anticipated, and I had to make one sacrifice right off the bat. There was no way that I could get the legs to physically retract the way they do on the actual ship, even more so at this scale. So unfortunately there is a small bit of "parts-forming" required between modes, but I made it as little as possible. I was able to get the wing mounts to extend out of the main body to allow upper leg movement though. The other thing that always made the model look wrong was using the head build method established by LEGO. While the stickers used to make up the "face" look nice, the overall head shape is left extremely flat. It took a week or so of playing with parts, but I was finally able to come up with a brick-built head design I was happy with. While it may not be perfect, for the most part has the general shaping of the actual Hyena bomber. I then utilized variations of the technique to build the other head-like shapes on the ship, including the targeting head below. I've also included a couple photos with some of my other MOCs for size comparison. Prior to working on the Hyena bomber, I had built a minifig scale Vulture droid, but was unhappy with the stock LEGO style head. However after figuring out the head for the Hyena bomber it wasn't too hard to down-scale to get a suitable head for it too. So since they are fairly similar I'm including the pictures of it here as well. Both ships were designed to use The Clone Wars colour schemes, although it could be debated that they Hyena should be sand blue rather than DBG, but given that practically none of the pieces come in that colour, there wasn't much choice. There are scenes from the show where it does look more grey that blue anyways. As always, hope you enjoy! I'll be back soon with my minifig scale ATT and DDT.
  19. Hey everyone, today I bring you my take on a minifig scale LAAT/i or Republic Gunship. Firstly, this thing is complicated... I started working on this early last year, but took a break from it because trying to figure out how to translate the complex shape of this thing was driving my crazy. While there are a lot of really nice gunships out there, I really wanted to see if I could match the narrow profile of the front of the ship, as well as get the flare out to the back that it has. Needless to say, accomplishing that in Lego is not easy, but I think I came up with a decent solution. The entire upper part of the gunship actually tapers from 6 studs wide in the back, down to 4 in the front. The "floor" of the gunship also tapers, which is one of the most common things people seem to avoid in other MOCs, probably because it's a major pain to do and it messes with the door alignment. The doors utilize technic fig hands and mixel joints to achieve the sloping from the front to back of the gunship. The doors were a real challenge due to the angles, and my first go at it didn't have enough head room to allow for a fig to stand inside, so I had to take another go at it, but this version seems to hold up. As usual a pic with my Delta-7B for scale. And some other colour variants. I've also done some test building to make sure that this thing actually works, I was worried that with all the angles it would be extremely brittle, but it holds together better then I thought it would. Inspiration notes: Under wing supports as well as some frontal structure inspired by Caleb Ricks. Front nose roundness inspired by Maelven. Engine build inspired by Chef Aslopert. Engine cones inspired by Kit Bricksto. Flood/Search lights inspired by David Buchholz.
  20. So I've been working on this on and off for the past 7 years. I wanted to have the Eta-2's to go along with my Delta-7B's. Initially my design was heavily based on Gunner's, which I had seen on this forum. The size was very close to minifig scale, and it served as a good starting point. However I ended up unsatisfied with my result. Four years later after having worked on my Ghost, I took another stab at it and started to make a bit more headway. I focused more and more on correcting my shaping and overall design. By the end of last year I had finalized a design that I was pretty happy with, the only drawback being the lack of 29119 & 29120 in yellow. Thankfully they came out with the introduction of the 76897 Audi. Earlier this month I took another look at my design, and while I did still like it, I felt it could use some final tweaks. And by simply changing the mandibles I found a new love for the design of this ship. So much so that I went ahead and updated my version for Ahsoka, and did up all the other versions from the movies. So here we go; My design progress. Anakin's Eta-2 from the Clone Wars, with s-foils open and closed. Some additional views. The cockpit interior and under the s-foils (showing the hole through the wing). The usual size comparison to my Delta-7B. Ahsoka's Eta-2 from the Clone Wars, with s-foils open and closed. Some additional views. And now the designs seen in Revenge of the Sith. Anakin's Yellow Eta-2. With a comparison to the new 2020 75281 Anakin's Jedi Interceptor. Anakin's Green Eta-2. Obi Wan's Red Eta-2. And finally Obi Wan's Blue Eta-2. As a final note, all of these are buildable except for Anakin's green Eta-2 (There are several pieces unavailable in Dark Green and some in Dark Bluish Grey). I have Ahsoka's test built in mostly the correct colours, I've placed a Bricklink order to get the pieces I need to finish both hers and Anakin's CW Eta-2. Once I have them completed I'll take some photos and add them here. As always, enjoy.
  21. First of all a big thanks to @Stephan for all the assistance and @polymaker for Brick Studio software, I couldn't have made the following video tutorial with you. Few weeks ago as I noticed LDD was being updated by the community, I got a crazy idea... Is there a way to import an object into LDD so you can use it as a reference? Having this kind of an option would make designing scale models much easier and faster. I asked @Stephan for his input and he managed to provide the first ever working example of this idea. Since then I learned how to import any 3D model into LDD and have therefore created this tutorial. In the following video tutorial I go through the process of importing any 3D object to LDD. I think the implications of this possibility are simply HUGE across all Lego themes and it's my hope this tutorial will help and inspire you all.
  22. LDD/MLCad 13C Ahoy, gentlemen of fortune and guards of the brick seas. I haven't been on the forum for a long time and now looked over all your creations - they are just magnificent, all of them! I still feel myself like a novice in lego-building.. Anyway, Dunkleosteus' Shipyards are back with this harsh lady. Сonstructed a month ago, only now she has come under your considerate professional eyes. I think this is my last ship based on the prehab hull technology - this method imposes too many limitations. There are 3 type of cannons: - lightweight culverins - heavy carronades - long-range cannons Also you can see a mortar boat on board Maybe later, if I would find a possibility of rendering, the another ship, unusual and frightening, will drop anchor in the bay so that everyone can enjoy its menacing shape Thank you very much for your attention!
  23. manglegrat

    [LDD-MOC] Battlestar Galactica

    After finishing up the in-the-brick Pegasus, I finally dusted off (virtually) the LDD design I had started on for a version of the Galactica scaled to it. All 100% my own work, this time! I originally designed the sidepods (based on the top half of the Pegasus ones) pretty quickly, but then got so hung-up on the curves and ribs for the engines that I got stuck in a rut and gave up on it. When I came back to it I started at the front and worked my way back. When I got to the engines I used some of the artistic license I had learned to apply to do the missing plating/ribs, and that allowed me to push through to the end result below. She currently weighs-in at a svelte-for-her-age 3087 bricks, and according to LDCad she's 65L x 11H x 25W in bricks (not technically long enough to be a real SHIP, but hey) or ~51cm long by 10cm high by 20cm wide. Pegasus is 54cm long x 13cm high x 26cm wide - and generally a lot bulkier - in comparison. I've still to design a stand, or sticker sheet (need some for the engine nozzles for sure - can't texture them out fully with Lego at this scale), but those can come as I gather the bricks. May need to build this one before I get to the @mortesv Nebulon... So here she is - the grand old lady herself: The pods slide in and out on rails, and kinda recess into the bodywork (as much as I could with Lego, anyway). They're a real PITA to move around in LDD... And here's a view of the underside and engines (the 4 technic 32530 pieces in the middle are placeholders for connecting the stand) with the pods retracted to show how they integrate with the main body: There's another underside shot (front perspective) plus my reference image in my Flickr album. I may go & fire up my old Mac to do a 360 render now... Any feedback, comments or suggestions are welcome!
  24. Me again - exercising some more SciFi TV show nerdism. As I was wrapping up the Schwarzkopf, I found an awesome LDD MOC on Flickr by CK-MCMLXXXI (don't know if they're on Eurobricks), and decided to try to reverse-engineer it, similar to how I ended up building Agamemnon - except in this case I only had 3 pics (4 angles) to go from, and no clues to go by for the internals. The designer wasn't sharing the LDD files (which is totally fair - I won't share mine for this either to stay true to that) but I said I'd love to build it, and they challenged me to do so... Challenge accepted! I managed to make something pretty close to their original but had to make some changes as I couldn't make all the bodywork angles match the original design perfectly. Some of the angles for the head were a nightmare to figure out - I had to do an ugly colourbarf mock-up IRL to test whether it was even possible or not! But yep, all the connections are legal in LDD this time - and I think there's enough clutch-power and structure in the 6 supports to hold up the sidepods IRL. I'm pretty happy with how it turned out - Bluerender did a great job for the shots below, after I did some lighting experimentation. It's 3455 bricks, but I'm not sure they're all available in all the colours - haven't checked that yet... LxWxH it's 65x35x14 studs/bricks, or 522x280x136mm, according to MLCad. I'd add some stickers to it if I was actually building it IRL, but I currently have no plans to do so (the wife thinks it looks too "stubby" )... More pics including some LDD WIP screenshots are available in my Flickr album, and here's a 360 render as a bonus: Hope the other BSG series fans out there like it! ;) I guess now I've done "The Beast" I should try the Galactica and/or a Cylon Basestar someday... if I could do them in the same scale that'd be pretty sweet, but that may be a stretch-goal too far!
  25. To keep this topic clean of comments, please request and discuss HERE All the undesired posts will be moved in the aforementioned related thread It has been a long time since Lego Digital Designer (LDD) has been updated with new parts. For a long time the exact format of the code from the LDD parts was not exactly understood. Now, a few members of the Eurobricks community cracked the code and are able to create parts in the format LDD uses. This post shall list these new parts and contains a link to a zip/rar file with those new parts. Rules Off course we would all like to have as many new parts as soon as possible. That doesn't necessarily guarantee the highest quality standard. Therefor we have compiled some rules. Only parts that adhere to these rules will be added to the parts pack(s). Parts may only come from open sources. That means that LDraw parts are allowed, but that Mecabricks parts are strictly forbidden; A part must always have connectivity and boundary boxes; A part may include collision boxes but this is not necessary for approval. Reaching the LDD part database First things first. How to access the current parts of LDD? We need to know that before we can add new parts. Windows Download LDD LIF Extractor for 32- or 64-bit systems. The LIF file contains the LDD parts. It can be found here: LINK; Unzip the LIF Extractor zip file; Navigate to: Users/[UserName]/AppData/Roaming/LEGO Company/LEGO Digital Designer. The "AppData" folder could be hidden; if so: activate "Show hidden files"; Here you'll find a file named "db.lif". Drag that file onto LIFExtractor.exe; You'll now find a folder named "db". Rename "db.lif" into something else (i.e. "xxdb.lif"), this is your parts back-up file! Enter the folder, go to "Primitives". This folder contains the technical data for the parts. Navigate further to "LOD0", this folder contains the 3D models for the parts. iOS/Mac Download LIF-Extractor from JrMasterModelBuilder. It can be found here: LINK. Go to folder: /Users/myusername/Library/Application\ Support/LEGO\ Company/LEGO\ Digital\ Designer/ Extract the db.lif using JrMasterModelBuilder's LIF-Extractor.py Python script by using Terminal: python LIFExtractor.py /Users/myusername/Library/Application\ Support/LEGO\ Company/LEGO\ Digital\ Designer/\db.lif This will create a "db" subfolder containing the extracted contents of the db.lif file. Rename "db.lif" into something else (i.e. "xxdb.lif"), this is your parts back-up file! Enter the folder, go to "Primitives". This folder contains the technical data for the parts. Navigate further to "LOD0", this folder contains the 3D models for the parts. Accessing the new parts Now for the real exciting part: adding parts to LDD. Lego Digital Designer should be closed for this. Download the update parts pack (rar file) to the location of the "db" folder from the latest post below; Unpack the folder; If asked if you want to replace files, click "Yes to all". Now you will have the latest parts and the newest part geometries. Contributors We own the addition of these new parts to them, please give them some credit. @jester: 211 parts changed or added @Stephan: 5 parts changed or added @Equilibrium: 32 parts added, 35 parts updated How to contribute Coming soon!