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Found 22 results

  1. This MOC started out as an inspiration from the 42078 Mack Anthem: I wanted to build a truck of similar scale but with better functionality and power functions. Seeing how the 42078’s trailer had no PF or gearbox whatsoever, I saw this as a point for some development. I actually started the building process with the trailer as it was to be the more functions-dense part of the MOC, so the actual Kenworth component didn’t come in until halfway through the build. The trailer includes a central distribution gearbox where one switch controls between the motorized functions and the pneumatic compressor and the other selects 1 of the 2 motorized functions, which are lowering the front stabilizers and rotating the crane. The boom and jib are pneumatic, and both the extension and the winch are controlled manually. There are also manually deployed rear stabilizers that keep the trailer stable while the crane is in use, and the entire rear bed can be removed by pulling out several bushes (not seen in the video). As for the actual Kenworth T600 part of the build, its scale is nearly identical to the 42078 Mack truck. The truck’s functions include steering via a knob behind the cab and a 6-cylinder mini piston engine, which I made in yellow to represent a Caterpillar engine. Inside the cab there’s a steering wheel and 2 seats, and there is a bed with a TV above it in the sleeper. The part I’m most happy about with this part of the build was the hood - nearly half of it was built with System pieces to capture the shaping of it. Overall I felt that, despite its simplicity compared to the trailer, the truck portion managed to capture the design of the real Kenworth T600 very well. This MOC was a breakthrough in that this was essentially a MOC composed of two independent MOCs: a truck and a trailer. The building process was one of the most interesting I’ve had among the MOCs I’ve made, and it was very interesting looking at the two independent parts come together. All the functions worked as intended, and the pneumatics operated with pretty good speed. I’m definitely looking forward to exhibiting it at BrickFair Virginia this August. Video: Photos:
  2. With all of the other entries for the [TC6] SBrick contest, I thought I'd post some work in progress pictures of my own entry. Some time before the contest actually started, I was starting to build the chassis of a most unusual truck, a custom Kenworth C500 tridem-tridem with a Cormach 23000A loader crane, assembled by Falcon Industries of Canada. My model is not quite a straightforward replica, but more inspired by this machine. Initially, I was planning on making the model more like a flagship set, with no remote control, and just a single motor for all the crane functions. But, when I heard about the competition, I just had to adapt this model to enter. The model itself is about 30% complete, consisting mostly of the chassis, and some parts of the bodywork, including the unusual C500 engine hood. The model currently has the following features: Drive, via XL motor, to the rear three axles, and to a modeled V-12 engine. (not quite realistic, but it looks cool.) Steering on the front three axles via Servo motor, with differing angles between the axles. This is accomplished with steering arms of differing lengths. Lights, controlled via a switch. An opening hood, with two fold up panels on each side, and two removable panels, as for a real C500. Opening cabinets on either side, as on the real thing. (one has not been added yet.) I plan to add more features, including the crane itself, and the rest of the bodywork. The crane functions will be controlled with a function splitter, somewhat similar to 8043, but different, as the splitter only has two motors, but six outputs. Thus, for the purpose of the contest, the four functions are: Drive, via XL motor. Steer, via Servo motor. Function split control, via servo motor Function splitter, driven by XL motor, with six functions. (Raising the crane arm, bending the crane arm, extension, winching, slewing, and the outriggers.) Now, on to some more photos of the chassis. This shot shows the rear light cluster, but I've got a better shot. These two shots show how the hood opens, and the removable side panels. The engine actually has many details, including a supercharger, a cooling fan, an airtank, an oil filter, and a batter box, with wires. The battery box is the dbg box with two strings coming out of it, representing wires. This shot is in the dark, with the truck lights on. And now, the money shot, the underside, showing the different lengths of steering arms to get different steering angles, and the drive train to the rear. These are detail shots of the undersides, showing better the drive and steering mechanism. The truck is so long, you can't really get a good view of the underside in just one picture. A detail shot of the opening cabinet. I wonder what, if anything, I should put in there. The rear bumper, with license plate from set #8682 Nitro Intimidator, mudflaps made out of track links, and the taillights, which actually work. Although, the license plate is not correct, as the real truck is from Canada. That's all for now, I hope you guys like it. P.S. I actually had this written out earlier, but I accidentally turned off my computer, and lost it. Oops.
  3. Hey guys, here's another project I've been working on alongside the Monster Bike. This is going to be a much bigger project, and will very likely be my first MOC going to BrickFair VA in August. It will be a truck and trailer MOC - the trailer will have several motorized functions and a pneumatic crane, and the truck will contain no electronic components - it will be all about the details, just like the 42078, and it will be built at a similar scale. At this point I have finished the distribution gearbox that will control all the motorized and pneumatic functions. The gearbox is set up similar to that of the 8110 (or 42070) - the "main" side will determine whether the motor drives the pneumatic compressor or the 2 motorized functions, and the "dependent" side will determine which of the two motorized functions the motor will drive. The motor is only connected to the main side, as the dependent side requires the main side to direct drive to it. As for the truck, I'm planning on a Kenworth T600 in black. The trailer will have a platform made of 5x11 panels in light bluish gray. The functions of the trailer will be: (This plan is tentative) Motorized functions: Trailer stabilizers Crane rotation (will have a worm gear somewhere in the gear train as this prevents manual rotation) Pneumatic Functions: (all will be on the crane arm) Elevation Second Section Extension (if space allows) Grabber If you have any suggestions, let me know in the comments below. Photos:
  4. 3 years ago I've decided that I'm getting tired of building medium-scale trucks and want to try something larger. Here's the result: Truck: Dimensions: 98 studs long / 29 studs wide / 43 studs tall Weight: 5.7 kg Motors: 14 Functions: drive with 2 PF XL motors on two rear axles a 4-speed sequential remotely-controlled transmission connected with a gear stick in the cabin, which moves as the transmission shifts front wheels steered using a virtual pivots steering system so that they can fit under realistically-sized mudguards fake engine with a rotating chain belt and 2 rubber belts, driven by the propulsion motors bypassing the transmission steering wheel rotating as the front wheels are steered left and right cabin doors independently opened by motors left and right sear independently adjusted forward/backward by motors remotely locked/unlocked fifth wheel openable sleeper with interior and interior lighting fake microwave with internal lighting and rotating turntable in the sleeper (yes, seriously) lighting kit by Brickstuff with 38 LEDs, featuring remotely-controlled turn signals, emergency lights, and automated reversing lights Trailer: Dimensions: 132 studs long / 30 studs wide / 22 studs tall Weight: 3.07 kg Motors: 3 Functions: remotely-controlled heavy-duty flip toe ramps remotely-controlled parking outriggers lever-operated winch LED beacon by Brickstuff Special thanks go to Brickstuff for all the lighting, Chrome Block City for beautifully chromed and engraved pieces, and Seven Studs for the awesome "Angry Hamster" hood ornament. Thank you guys! Photos and detailed description: http://sariel.pl/2018/03/kenworth-t600/
  5. OwnGaming

    OwnGamings moc's

    My new lego truck, a Kenworth T600 with daycab.
  6. May I present my newest MOC: the Kenworth W900 US Truck. It has all the technical functions you'd expect from a supercar: * Full live-axle suspension on all axles * Both rear-axles are driven * Remote-controlled steering with working steering wheel inside the cabin * PF-lights (OK, I went a bit overboard with those 8-) ) * Openable hood and cabin doors * Remote controlled driving And the most important function of this model: 4-Speed remote-controlled gearbox The main design goal for this gearbox was to have a reliable and comprehensive gearbox with more than 2 gears. One thing that was very important was that the gearbox had to be able to handle a lot of torque. It had to be able to drive large Lego Technic models. Another aspect was that switching gears had to be very easy. First, the transmission itself is a 2-way transmission, where one has a different gear ration compared to the other. Then I develloped a kind of switching-logic, where 1 M-motor would be able to switch 2 driving rings, each in either direction. For this I used differentials, 24z clutch gears and an inverter-mechanism which uses a sliding worm-wheel. Instructions Full building instructions for the Truck are available here.
  7. supertruper1988

    [MOC] 7 Wide Tractor Trailer City Scale

    I have just complete a MOC I want to show you all. I love American style trucks and trains. I did a bunch of research anf found that I like the look of 1 foot = 2 plates scale (about 1:48). This works out to have about a 7 wide semi truck and its important to me, to have 2 mini figs fit in the cab so I have to try to get a 6 wide windshield to look good. I have finally been able to build them in brick! Here are some renders of my truck: Tractor: Trailer: Both together: Here it is in brick next to many of my other LEGO official sets: Same height as 60075 Compared to the Constitution Train w/Minifig for scale: Next to 7632: I am also planning to build this with a different trailer of some sort: Please let me know your thoughts
  8. My latest release, a rerelease and rebuild of a three axle detachable gooseneck lowboy trailer with liftable third axle. The truck that goes with it is worked on right now! Will be released March 2015. Not yet had the change to work on a new video, but one will be available soon. So for now I use the first edition video of this model. Model "Trailer Tr4 MkII” is build with LEGO® in scale 1:17,5 and motorized using LEGO® Power Functions. It is not build after a specific brand or type of trailer. This build represents a three axle detachable gooseneck lowboy trailer with liftable third axle. The trailer features: solid axle suspension on all axles, one set of lights, kingpin, mechanical parking break, gooseneck frame support, remotely controlled liftable third axle, remotely lowering and lifting of the deck and this model has many details. This newly design and engineered trailer utilizes the same suspension as both "US Truck T1 MkII" and "US Truck T2 MkII". It uses LEGO® rubber belts and LEGO® rubber axle connectors. Designing and engineering this trailer parts availability is checked. So it can easily be build in the color as it is, Yellow, but it can also be build in Red, Blue and Black. Attention!!!: Both "US Truck T1 MkII" and "US Truck T2 MkII" needs to be adapted to be combined with "Trailer Tr4 MkII”!!! Else could be used a so called dolly which acts as a convert to fit the trailer. For this dolly building instructions will be available soon. Attention!!!: LEGO® Technic set 8258 Crane Truck needs to be adapted and requires a modified gooseneck!!! Instructions for "Trailer Tr4 MkII” to go with LEGO® Technic set 8258 Crane Truck will be available soon! This model is another custom design by Ingmar Spijkhoven AKA 2LegoOrNot2Lego that comes with building instructions and inventory/parts list!. So, you can build it yourself! To do so you can buy the Building Instructions. Early in the building process you will see what it is that you are building. You will be very excited from the moment you start the build of "Trailer Tr4 MkII" till you finish it with a total number of parts of about 1450 pieces. With this type of lowboy trailer the gooseneck is removed to make the deck accessible. Because the front part of the trailer rests on the surface the truck with the gooseneck still attached can drive off. In order to keep the gooseneck elevated at the correct hight is as a support. This support rests on the trucks frame. The ramps can be lowered and any self propelled load can enter the trailers deck. With the trailer loaded and the load secured the gooseneck can be reattached. This is done by backing up the truck aligned with the trailer. With a support that rests on the trucks frame the gooseneck can be lowered of lifted to make sure it comes in place. Finally the deck can be lifted again and the gooseneck can be locked so it doesn’t go anywhere without the trailer itself. Cheers, Ingmar Spijkhoven
  9. In the last couple of months I have, amongst other projects, been working on the rerelease of Truck T12. Because the detachable gooseneck lowboy "Trailer Tr4 MkII" can be combined with my previously released trucks and with Technic set 8258 it is why I released it first. Instructions for this lowboy have been asked so many times that I thought it would make sense to start with it. Normally I start with a truck followed by a trailer to join it. Model "Truck T12 MkII" and is build after the Mack Granite with LEGO® in scale 1:17,5 and motorized using LEGO® Power Functions. It is a model of a Mack Granite 6x4 day cab truck. Both the looks and specifications are adjusted to match lowboy ”Trailer Tr4 MkII” and the optional jeep and booster ”Trailer Tr4 MkII Add1”. This rather heavy lowboy trailer combination, which might include a load, requires some extra power.Even though this truck is designed to go with ”Trailer Tr4 MkII” plus ”Trailer Tr4 MkII Add1” lowboy combination in the first place, it doesn’t necessarily mean it can't be used with other available trailers as well. If you prefer to give it a flat bed or log trailer, you are free to do so! If a different trailer is used it might be useful to give this truck's drivetrain a various gear setup. For this a separate PDF file is available that tells you what gear reductions to use with which trailer. It also shows you how to do so. Evidently the torque will be reduced, but with lighter weight trailers that is no problem at all. This Mack Granite model is powered by a Mack MP8 engine which is visible with the hood opened. This power source is an inline 6 cylinder engine with a displacement of 13.0 L. The horsepower range is from 425 up to 505 HP and this engine has a torque range from 1570 to 1760. You could build it yourself, building instructions and inventory/parts list are available. You will be very excited from the moment you start the build of "Truck T12 MkII" till you finish it with about 360 different parts totaling 1900 pieces.
  10. Here is my latest project/MOC. Again it is a re-release and also with instructions. Check mocplans for the instructions and rebrickable for the parts list! Cheers, Ingmar Spijkhoven Introduction: Model US Truck T1 MkII with LEGO® Power Functions® which is a rebuild and revised version of US Truck T1 I finished back in 2009. This model represents the more aerodynamic US truck models like for example the Freightliner Cascadia. Like with all my models this is build in scale 1:17,5. This specific model comes with building instructions available at mocplans.com plus the inventory list available at rebrickable.com. This model features: solid axle suspension on all axles, PF powered driving with power transmitted independently to both rear axles, Ackerman geometry on steering axle, Servo powered steering, fully functional fifth wheel, modeled engine, detailed cabin interior and 3 light units. History of this build To start with a little history on how this model was designed and developed in the first place and how US Truck T1 evolved into US Truck T1 MkII. Back in 2009 I started building US Truck T1 and I really wanted it to have this more aerodynamic looks. From the very beginning of building MOCs I always tried to implement as many realistic features as possible. For example both version I and II of US Truck T1 features full solid axle suspension, Ackerman steering, realistic and working fifth wheel, openable hood, PF drive, PF steering and 3 light units. Design & development process Like with all builds, first a couple of design decisions had to be made: A) First of all I choose not to build this model after a specific brand or type. What I knew is that it had to be a typical US style truck with aerodynamic looks. Inspired by all the amazing US truck brands I just started designing my own truck. Because of my love for work and heavy duty trucks, specifically the Kenworth C500, this will always influence my builds. B) What scale to build in is another obvious quest when building models in general and also for building models using LEGO®. Since most work trucks have a little bigger and heavier wheels my favorite scale for building models became 1:17,5 because this suites me best. Also did I decide to build all my creations in this specific scale. To me it works great when models can be combined. C) I had to figure out what color scheme would work best for model US Truck T1. To start with I do not like building with Black colored items what is the obvious color for the chassis. Never the less this trucks chassis was build in black. With the color of the chassis set I could move on to the colors of the body work. D) Solid Red it became for the body work and I decided not to add any others. Basically because back those days I was very limited in how to add colors to models because of the way I build. Developing as a builder the abilities to add more color increased. I have been told the color of this first edition was a little boring and I agree on this. Why US Truck T1 MkII? In time my building skills develop and so did many solutions I could apply to any build. This specific model could be so much better if I would have build it these days. Because of so many improvements I thought it would be so nice to rebuild this creation. Rebuilding this MOC made me decide to name this updated version US Truck T1 MkII (it is based on US Truck T1, but revised in so many ways). Also did I decide to make building instructions available for it as well! Since 2009 the year in which I finished my first build ever I have been asked for instructions so many times. The process of creating instructions basically forced me to completely revise and rebuild it. Because of this process this new version is way much better and therefore very nice to build. This all together gave birth to US Truck T1 MkII and I am happy with both products: The revised truck itself and the instructions I sell for you to build this model too. Solid axle suspension This truck, US Truck T1 MkII, is build with full solid axle suspension on all three axles, so including the front steered axle. For this suspension to work I did a lot of research, trial and error and engineering. One major problem I noticed was the quite large size of LEGO® Technic Shock Absorber 6.5L. There was no way I could jam six of these into a chassis that is only four studs in between both chassis beams together with everything else that should be in there. Quite rapidly I came up with the idea of using Rubber Belts instead. To achieve this the movement needed to be converted so I came up with a lever constructions. Normally a spring is pushed in and comes back, but a rubber belt is stretched and comes back. Color scheme As I mentioned before I have been told the color of this first edition was a little boring and again I agree on this. Developing as a builder the abilities to add more color increased as did the urge to actually do so. So I started to combine different color combination with this solid Red body work of the model. Always keep in mind to check the availability of parts in a specific color. This forced me to change the color scheme a couple of times. Some key parts in a design may not be available in a specific color or some others might be very hard to get. With the instructions in order to make others build this model as well in mind hard to get parts is an unwanted side effect. Finally I ended up with the addition of both Dark Red and Dark Bluish Gray. These colors really brighten up the Red and give US Truck T1 MkII a classic feel to it. Steering system with Servo A part that I have been looking out to for so many many years is finally available. The LEGO® Power Functions® Servo (part #99498c01) has been release since August 2012. This amazing new electric motor enables the opportunity to create a much more realistic steering system that is also less space consuming. Aligned with the trucks chassis the Servo is sitting inside of the cabin right behind the modeled engine in between both seats. With a 90 degrees conversion the motion of the Servo is transferred to the steering axle. One other improvement to avoid the use of hard to get parts was applied. In order to give the steering axle the Ackerman geometry I initially used Gear Rack 1 x 12 with Holes (part #32132). This has been replaced to make building US Truck T1 MkII with the instructions I sell more attractive to others. Modeled engine inside As mentioned above the Servo requires less space and is sitting inside the drivers cabin. Because of this US Truck T1 MkII is provided with a modeled engine. This truck model is powered by a CAT® CT15 with this very appealing yellow color to it. With the hood opened it really catches the eye. External air cleaners would decrease this model's aerodynamics and with it the full efficiency so these are not mounted. On top of the CAT® CT15 engine there is this internal air cleaner system. The modeled engine is a small object that really improve the realism of this truck model. The engine is very nice to build and to give it those realistic looks a total number of about 120 parts is used. Engine is detailed with for example engine oil dipstick, fan, fan belt, pulleys, hoses, oil filters including by-pass oil filter, turbo, exhaust manifold and so on. Together with much more engine bay details which are added the looks are phenomenal. Openable hood Even though my models are not entirely smooth, so LEGO® studs are allowed to be visible, the hood does not show any studs at all. This really makes the hood elegant. With hinges the hood is openable and not without a reason. What is the use of a modeled engine siting inside if it is invisible. Like with the original version US Truck T1 MkII has an openable hood to give access to both engine bay and engine. With the hood opened one can clearly see the inline 6 cylinder engine with a displacement of 15.21L. With a horsepower range from 450 up to 550 HP and this engine has a torque range from 1550 to 1850 lb-ft. (1202 - 2508 Nm) at 1200 rpm peak torque. Together with the engine a lot more engine bay details are visible. These include break fluid reservoir, windshield washer container, internal air cleaner system and steering shaft. Easy battery box access One key feature that is important when building models with electric features is how to access the battery box as well as the on/off switch located on top of it. In order to make this build achievable for as many builders as possible I sticked with the battery box with 6x AA batteries, LEGO® Power Functions® Battery Box with Orange switch (part #59510c01). Easy to get, used in many sets and a part with a nice price tag to it. The battery box is sitting inside the sleeper. Easy to access by removing a hatch on top of the sleeper. It basically is a part of the roof that can be removed and the battery box is in sight as well as the on/off switch. For those who rather use the LEGO® Power Functions® Rechargeable Battery Box (part #84599) the model can easily be modified. Final improvements One of the noticeable improvement is the windshields window frame. First build used Bar 4L (part #30374) which are basically to small for the job. The new approach looks solid and is therefore more realistic. When TLC released LEGO® Power Functions® IR Speed Remote Control Unit (part #64227) back in 2009 I was really excited about it. First builds also used a XL Motor like this model to drive but with the use of Power Functions Remote Control Unit (part #58122c01) one has to be very careful. Because of the enormous strength of the XL Motor the drive line could be damaged easily. For this very reason the drive line was geared down quite a lot. US Truck T1 MkII has less gear reduction and is therefore quite a bid faster then its predecessor. With the use of the Speed Remote Control Unit both driving and steering became very realistic and therefore the playability of this model is extremely increased! Building instructions To give you an idea of how the instructions for this model will look like here is a preview. Creating these instructions both quick progress on your build and being easy to understand were the main goals. Early in the building process you will see what it is that you are building. You will be very excited from the moment you start the build of T US Truck T1 MkII till you finish it with a total number of parts of about 2250 pieces. To achieve this a lot of floating items are used, with added arrows to show where these items are suppose to be. Together with a lot of so called call outs (the smaller windows within a step that shows the assembling of a smaller sub part of the build) together with multi part steps (not only one part at a time) the build will be in a flow. Check mocplans for the instructions and rebrickable for the parts list!
  11. Close to a year ago I built a rocky mountain double flat-bed trailer with an attached forklift. To tow it I built a model of a lego Kenworth T-680 in red, blue, and white, with a ginormous cab. Since the model mostly sits on a shelf, I always wanted to build a fully enclosed trailer to match the truck's high cabin design for a better side profile look. Well, finally after a long time accumulating 8x16 tiles, I finished it, so thought I would share it here. This is a model of a 53 foot trailer with a built in reefer. It is about 114 studs long, 18 studs wide, and 28 studs high. The trailer contains three PF M-motors operated via remote control. 1. Raise and lower liftgate. 2. Extend and retract liftgate. 3. Raise and lower trailer legs. An electrical tail light connection comes from the main tractor and is operated by remote control on/off. This trailer is shown being pulled by my 1:18 model of a Kenworth T680 semi truck. Together the semi-truck and red reefer trailer are about 4 feet long. Overall, the trailer enclosure is pretty stable and not as fragile as I thought it would end up being. There's minimal flex in the frame and it looks pretty realistic. To make a boring trailer a bit unique I wanted to add a retractable liftgate similar to the one in Madoca's wing body truck. I took the same liftgate design from my earlier B-train flat-bed trailer and mounted it on a pair of steering racks to hide and extend it. But the up/down operation is not always as smooth as the original one because it sometimes tends to catch a bit against the edges of the rear fender. I think the way to fix this would end up detracting a bit from the aesthetics of the rear, so I left it as-is. Originally I was thinking to put the battery underneath the frame, but that would make it hard to turn it on or off while lifting up the trailer. So the battery sits as cargo inside the enclosed compartment and is easily reachable without moving the trailer off the ground. After making the video from a vantage point at ground level, I noticed that the wheels of both the trailer and truck were quite cambered due to all the weight. I later improved on this by changing the way the axles are attached to the frame in both the truck and the trailer. The instructions and parts list includes a better design than what was used in the video. More pics and full instructions are up on rebrickable http://rebrickable.c...i-truck-trailer and mocpages http://www.moc-pages.com/moc.php/423789
  12. Hello everyone, I built a model of Kenworth truck (T380) On the way I built motorhome I dream to build a reality ... I added a trailer with a Chevrolet El Camino 72 loaded on it Say what you think Enjoy :-)
  13. My latest release, a log trailer with three axles of which the last one is liftable. It comes in two color schemes to match both "US Truck T1 MkII" and "US Truck T2 MkII". Model "Trailer Tr3 MkII” is build with LEGO® in scale 1:17,5 and motorized using LEGO® Power Functions. It is not build after a specific brand or type of trailer. This build represents a three axle log trailer with liftable third axle. The trailer features: solid axle suspension on all axles, one set of lights, kingpin, remotely controlled landing gear and parking break, remotely controlled liftable third axle that simultaneously extends or retracts the rear impact guard and this model has many details. This newly designed and engineered trailer utilizes the same suspension as US Truck T2 MkII which uses LEGO® rubber belts and LEGO® rubber axle connectors. This model is another custom design by Ingmar Spijkhoven AKA 2LegoOrNot2Lego that comes with building instructions and inventory/parts list! You can build it yourself! To do so you can buy the Building Instructions. Early in the building process you will see what it is that you are building. You will be very excited from the moment you start the build of "Trailer Tr3 MkII" till you finish it with a total number of parts of about 1000 pieces. Simultaneously with lifting the third axle the rear impact guard is retracted. So with the third axle down the rear impact guard is fully extended, this to increase safety when hauling loads. Unloaded the total length of the combination is reduced with the third axle lifted and the rear impact guard in. As with most log trailers this model has so called bolsters or bunks. Those are the U shaped frames on top of the trailers chassis. Bolsters are obviously necessary to keep the logs in place. Even though the bolsters on this specific model are fixed they can easily be re-located if wanted. The number of six can also be altered to your own needs. Give this trailer the setup you want it to have. Cheers, Ingmar Spijkhoven
  14. Finally my Kenworth K100E is ready. I took a while before it was done. I start building this model back in the summer of 2011, when I came back from the UK. Heading for the ferries I also took a short visit to the yard of Neil Yates Recovery. I knew they have a K100 and I was very pleased it was parked there at that moment. Building is wasn't an easy task. It would become my first US truck on a large scale and with the use of chrome parts. I hardly had some in my collection and I had to buy everything; that's rather expensive. I had a chassis and the exterior of the cab but then I decided to build a smaller version first; my previous K100 with Holmes twin boom. That one turned out very well and I continued building the NYR wrecker in 2013. It's my largest solo vehicle so far, with the exception of the large Liebherr mobile crane I built during the 90s. I took quite some pictures which can be viewed in my Flickr stream; here you can see some details as well.
  15. Hello thear... Do you remember the set 6393 BIG RIG TRUCK STOP? i did it in my own style with my trucks. i combined also part of the service station from 10184. photos: TRUCKS: 1)Kenworth T408 8X4 2) kenworth K200 3) peterbilt 359 4) Mack ultraliner LXF Link: http://www.brickshel.../truck_stop.lxf original set: What do you think?
  16. In the last couple of weeks I have, amongst other projects, been working on the rerelease of Trailer Tr1. Here it is this latest project: Model "Trailer Tr1 MkII type T1" is build with LEGO® in scale 1:17,5 and motorized using LEGO® Power Functions. It is not build after a specific brand or type of trailer. This build represents a two axle reefer (refrigerated) trailer with tandem axle slider. The trailer features: solid axle suspension on all axles, three sets of lights, a kingpin, remotely controlled landing gear and parking break, remotely controlled tandem axle slider, and many details. Scale: 1:17,5 Length: 826 mm Weight: 2,78 kg Parts: 1730 It’s color scheme matches that of „Truck T1 MkII” extremely well and so does its aerodynamic looks. The trailer’s weight is reduced by a light weight constructions of both the walls and roof and also by reducing it’s frame. The „container” is strong enough by itself so the frame is only used to attach necessities. These include the tandem axle slider, Power Functions and landing gear. Within a couple of weeks two more editions of this very same trailer will be available. First will be type T2 that fits the color scheme of „Truck T2 MkII” just perfect. The third edition, type Tx will have standard "factory" colors to fit any other truck model available or is to be combined with your own truck design. What is particularly new to this model is the avoidance of the hard to get Black Technic Steering Arm Small (BrickLink ID 6571). The newly designed rear axle now uses another part instead which will be available for many years! To adjust the weight on different axle groups the trailer’s tandem axle group can slide along the trailer. The tandem axle group can be moved forwards and backwards to put the axles where the weight is best distributed. With this the distance between the kingpin and the axle group can be altered. This is referred to as the trailer wheelbase. The longer the trailer wheelbase, the less maneuverable the truck-trailer combination. This model is another custom design that comes with building instructions and inventory/parts list! Early in the building process you will see what it is that you are building. You will be very excited from the moment you start the build of "Trailer Tr1 MkII" till you finish it with about 230 different parts totaling 1730 pieces. Cheers, Ingmar Spijkhoven
  17. It has been a while since I have been on this forum. To be honest forums are not really my thing, I loose track... Never the less do I like to share my latest creation. It is an older model completely revised. Because I really felt doing so, but also to create instructions. So I did, please have fun reading this. Share you thoughts on it and when you feel like doing so please build it yourself some day!!! Cheers, Ingmar Spijkhoven To start with a little history on how this model was designed and developed in the first place and how US Truck T2 evolved into US Truck T2 MkII. Back in 2008 I started building US Truck T2 after I had finally managed to build a very sufficient and realistic suspension system. From the very beginning of building MOCs I always tried to implement as many realistic features as possible. For example both version I and II of US Truck T2 features full solid axle suspension, Ackerman steering, realistic and working fifth wheel, openable hood, PF drive, PF steering and PF lights. With the chassis still evolving, but good enough to start building the model itself a couple of decisions had to be made: A) First of all I choose not to build a specific brand or type of truck. What I knew is that it had to be a typical US style truck. Because of my love for work trucks brochures available at Kenworth.com became my main inspiration source. B) What scale to build in is another obvious quest when building models in general and also for building LEGO® models. Since most work trucks have a little bigger and heavier wheels my favorite scale for building models became scale of 1:17,5 because this suites me best. C) I had to figure out what color scheme would work best for model US Truck T2. Why exactly I can't recall but the chassis ended up Red and I still love it. With the color of the chassis pointed to Red I could move on to the colors of the body work. D) Searching the Internet for inspiration on this build I noticed that Red and White is a nice color combination. Trying a couple of colors to combine with this evolving color scheme I ended up with Blue. Since not all parts I needed were available in Blue back then I came up with the use of Dark Blue. Because of so many improvements I thought it would be so nice to rebuild this creation. Rebuilding this MOC made me decide to name this updated version US Truck T2 MkII (it is based on US Truck T2, but revised in so many ways). Thinking about the rebuild, not yet started, made me realize that it would also be amazing to make building instructions available for it as well! The process of creating instructions basically forced me to completely revise and rebuild it. So in the looks it is not even changed that much but to get the build going with the instructions as guideline I had to change so many things. Because of this process this new version is way much better and therefore very nice to build. The finished build of US Truck T2 back in March 2009 was basically a result of all the effort I had put in this realistic suspension system. For this suspension to work I did a lot of research, trial and error and engineering. One major problem I noticed was the quite large size of Technic® Shock Absorber 6.5L. There was no way I could jam six of these into a chassis that is only four studs wide together everything else that should be in there. Quite rapidly I came up with the idea of using Rubber Belts instead. So I came up with a lever constructions. Normally a spring is pushed in and comes back, but a rubber belt is stretched and comes back. In the build of US Truck T2 MkII I replaced the hard to get Sand Blue colored parts by Dark Blue ones. Back in 2009 part 30357 Plate Round Corner 3 x 3 wasn't available in either Blue or Dark Blue. These colors I did prefer back then with the build of US Truck T2. This forced me to use this part in the less common color Sand Blue. Even though this was a switch that worked out very well I prefer not to use this color. Mainly because parts in this color are hard to get. So now that these parts are available I had the chance to give US Truck T2 MkII the initial color scheme I came up with for the first build. A part that I have been looking out to for so many many years is finally available. The LEGO® Power Functions® Servo enables the opportunity to create a much more realistic steering system for US Truck T2 MkII. Aligned with the trucks chassis the Servo is sitting inside of the cabin right behind the modeled engine. Since the movement of the Servo needs to be converted 90 degrees a challenge occurred. Luckily we still have this older LEGO® part 4143 Technic Gear 14 Tooth Bevel. Because the Servo requires less space US Truck T2 MkII is equipped with a modeled engine. Because of some parts I needed to build this engine that are only available in Light Bluish Gray this became the engines color. Searching the web for inspiration I noticed Detroit Diesel has some very nice power sources available. Doing some research made me choose to build the DD15. Modeling this engine was very satisfying. A small object to build but to give a realistic look still a lot of parts are used to build it. What is the use of a modeled engine if it is invisible. Like with the early version this revised model has an openable hood. For inspiration I used the Kenworth C500 PDF brochure. One picture shows a truck with a opened hood and shows really nice how a part of the fenders is attached to the cabin. So this part of the fenders stays in place when the bonnet is opened, I really love this concept. One other major improvement is the battery box accessibility as well as the location of the on/off switch. To make this achievable for as many builders as possible I sticked to the battery box with 6x AA batteries. With the original US Truck T2 to replace the batteries the entire roof had to be removed together with the sleepers back side. For the on/off switch I installed a complex mechanism that needed small doors to operate the switch. As complex as it sounds it really was and I was never happy with this solution. The roof of US Truck T2 MkII now has a hatch to access the battery box and the on/off switch. Besides decorative purposes these bars are supposed to support the roof, which they didn't! Thanks to digitalizing my model with BrickSmith I noticed/discovered a much better solution. Besides that it looks less fragile this new window frame really became supportive. When TLC released LEGO® Power Functions® IR Speed Remote Control Unit item number 64227 I was really excited about it. First build also used a XL Motor to drive but with the use of Power Functions Remote Control Unit item #58122c01 one has to be very careful. US Truck T2 MkII has less gear reduction and is therefore quite a bid faster then its predecessor. To give you an idea how the instructions look like here is a preview. Creating these instructions both quick progress on your build as well as each step being easy to understand the same time were very important. Early in the building process you will see what is happening, what it is that you are building. You will be very excited from the moment you start this build till you finish the build of US Truck T2 MkII with a total number of parts of about 1800 pieces. To achieve this a lot of floating items are used, with added arrows to show where these items are suppose to be. Together with a lot of so called call outs (the smaller windows within a step that shows the assembling of a smaller sub part of the build) together with multi part steps the build will be in a flow. Check mocplans for the instructions and rebrickable for the parts list!
  18. Building trucks and trailers and occasionally earth moving equipment I switched a little. Not to boats or minifig scale or what so ever, no I build a race truck. My dark ages ended by an attempt to build a model equal to those available by Tamyia. Yeah, I know, this might sound weird, but at that moment I didn't have any clue. So I installed 4 RC Buggy motors in a single none steered 4x4 vehicle. Obviously all build with LEGO® parts, so don't be confused. All four RC Buggy motors hooked up to a single RC Race Buggy Battery / Receiver Unit, and that went totally wrong. First I had no longer forward motion and after a while no reverse either. Yes I burned out that Receiver unit. Never did I realize a single stalled RC Buggy motor requires 3A times 4 means 12A. Probably this exceeds the limits of the RC Buggy Receiver Unit. This I just share to give you an idea why I am interested in this RC Buggy electronics. I entirely let go of the idea I could build a LEGO® model as strong and fast as for example the Tamyia Wild Willy I had for many years. This "real" RC I bought with my saving money at the age of 12. Alright, now back to this model. It all started with an idea of building a race truck about two or maybe even three years ago. The initial design was supposed to be more "funny" then a serious model. In time this approach changed and I really looked into racing trucks. There are so many nice LEGO® build race truck models out there I had to compete :-) Model "Truck T10" is build with LEGO® in scale 1:17,5 and is motorized using RC Racer Buggy components. It is not build after a specific brand or type of truck. This build represents an imaginary race truck which is strongly inspired by Mike Ryan's "Banks Freightliner Super Turbo Pikes Peak Truck". Another custom design that comes with building instructions and inventory/parts list! Features: independent front suspension, drag axle rear suspension, propulsion by two RC Racer Buggy motors, remotely controlled driving and steering, openable doors, openable hood, modeled engine and cabin interior. This model is meant to be an appetizer for those who already own one of these original LEGO® sets: 8366, 8367 or 8475. For this model/project both the RC Race Buggy Battery / Receiver Unit and a truck design are combined. Basically the rear chassis consists out of two RC Race Buggy motors, a frame that holds them together. This frame also holds a wheely bar and the spoiler with its support structure. The front axle suspension is a double acting system with a mixture of the suspension parts used in sets 8466 en 8297 with a total of four soft shock absorbers. This model's detailed engine is based on Mike Ryan's Super-Turbo engine setup which is built around a 14.0L Detroit Diesel Series DD60 six cylinder inline semi truck engine. Introduced in 2001 this 14 liter (854 cu in) engine has a power output up to 575 hp and a maximum torque of 1,850. These numbers where not enough to label it as a race truck, so it had to be souped up and that is where Banks Power came in. Cheers, Ingmar Spijkhoven
  19. As mentioned with the release of US Truck MkII instructions for a trailer to go with this truck would be available. I am happy and proud to present them to you. Here is my latest creation: Trailer Tr2 MkII (with instructions). What was true for the revised version of the truck might even be more true for this trailer. Believe me when I say this revised version and the original design are poles apart. In the looks it may not even be changed that much, but don't be fooled by its appearance! This all together brings forth Trailer Tr2 MkII and I am happy with both achievements: The revised trailer itself and the instructions for anyone else to build this trailer. Check mocplans for the instructions and rebrickable for the parts list! Cheers, Ingmar Spijkhoven LEGO® model Trailer Tr2 MkII with LEGO® Power Functions® which is a rebuild and revised version of Trailer 2 I finished back in 2009. Like with all my models this is build in scale 1:17,5, which makes them to be combined!!! This specific model comes with building instructions available at mocplans.com plus the inventory list available at rebrickable.com. This model features: full solid axle suspension, LEGO® Power Functions® remotely controlled landing gear and parking brake and three sets of Power Functions® lights. As with the rebuild of US Truck T2 this writing starts with a little history on how this trailer came in to existence. Because of so many improvements and changes this trailer evolved into Trailer Tr2 MkII and suites absolutely excellent with US Truck T2 MkII. After finishing US Truck T2 back in 2009 I started working on a trailer to go with it. I have always been intrigued by those big American trucks out in the open with all kind of loads on those very easy to use flatbed and drop deck trailers. One other very important concern to me is the playability of the truck and trailer combination so less weight would increase this. From day one of building truck and trailer models I always go for implementing as many realistic features as possible. So this build features full solid axle suspension, LEGO® Power Functions® remotely controlled landing gear and parking brake and finally three sets of PF lights. After finishing the build of the semi-truck or tractor the build of the semi-trailer that goes with it could be launched. Like I do with all builds, first a couple of design decisions had to be made: A) Like with US Truck T2 (and MkII) I choose not to build this trailer after a specific brand or type. What I knew is that it had to be a typical US style trailer. Because of the way I was building back those days I had to give this trailer a drop in the deck. B) Since the scale was set because of the build of US Truck T2 the scale was not an issue. What was an issue is what wheels to use. Even though most trailers used in the Netherlands (Europe) have so called super singles, I prefer to use the same tires as with the truck itself. C) Setting these parameters was a nice start, but more quests had to be conquered. For example what color scheme would work best for this model especially because it had to fit US Truck T2's color scheme. The color of the frame would undoubtedly be Red. Bringing back the Blue would be obvious too. D) One detail that really caught my eye is the alternating Red and White retroreflective strips. Its role is evident and it really breaks the color and the looks of the trailer in a very positive way. E) The final call would be what to use as deck, the floor itself. Most straightforward would be the use of plates in any suitable size. I ended up using modified plates 8 x 8 with grille and hole in center. Describing US Truck T2 MkII did unfold why it was rebuild, allow me to do the same for this trailer rebuild: Since the build of the original version of this trailer my building skills develop and so did many solutions used. Likewise the truck this trailer model could be so much better if I would have build it these days. So I did! Rebuilding this MOC made me decide to name this updated version Trailer Tr2 MkII (it is based on Trailer T2, but revised in so many ways). The process of creating instructions for this trailer as well essentially forced me to rebuild it in total. Not just implementing some improvements. No, there is not much left of the original design. Besides all this the perspective has changed totally because I wanted to create instructions for this build too. So in the looks it may not even be changed that much, but believe me when I say this revised version and the original design are poles apart. My first attempt back in 2009 was to build a flatbed, so a trailer with a one level deck without a drop in it. Because of a lot of decisions I made while building the truck itself with its frame, suspension and fifth wheel, the fifth wheel ended up quite high. To give the flatbed good looks too, it should not be to high on its wheels. It would have been if I would have build it with a leveled deck. So I had to change my mind from building a flatbed to this drop deck. All of this mainly because of limitations I experienced back in 2008/2009 because of my lack of knowledge. I had to learn how to build with LEGO® all over again because of so many great new parts. Even though I am able to build a flatbed these days I sticked with the original drop deck. Since there is quite a lot of it I wanted the floor of the deck to be nice to look at. Functionality is important to me simultaneously as you might know right now, so that counts too. The overall width of the trailer is 18 studs, minus two tiles one on both sides leaves me 16 studs for the floor itself. Divid this by two makes eight studs on each side which gave me a range of opportunities. Quickly it was narrowed down to only two: The most obvious would have been to use plates with a length of 8 and a width of any needed size. Not bad to start with, but not really appealing to me so I continued the search. I ended up with the use of modified plates 8 x 8 "with grille and hole in center". These are available in very nice colors, it has great looks, light in weight and not that expensive. These plates suites the job just perfect, the studs make them what I call "sticky" this to prevent the load from sliding and it could further more be used to attach loads. The trailer's total length and both main and upper deck had to be adjusted to the use of these 8 x 8 plates. Still can't figure why, let me tell you: For the truck I came up with a very nice and realistic functional suspension system. Which I still use in all current projects and I will use in future ones. For some reason I had to use a rather simple suspension system for the trailer. Not that it wasn't sufficient, no it was, but not realistic for this type of trailer. The system itself is not as impressive as how it is referred to: longitudinal pendular axles! In the real world, I mean in the situation it is not a model, this type of suspension would cause a lot of damage. Damage to both trailer and load this because not enough stress is absorbed going over bumps or other obstacles. This rebuild trailer utilizes the same suspension as US Truck T2 MkII it uses LEGO® rubber belts and LEGO® rubber axle connectors. It occurred to me that it would be amazing to make this trailer what I call stand alone. With this I mean that it has a power source of its own. This results into the need of giving it a battery box. Please realize back in 2009 the much smaller battery box that holds 6 AAA batteries was not available. Both beams of the trailer's frame consist of two rows of Technic Bricks stacked with two layers of plates. The main reason to build it this strong was to avoid the trailer to bend under its own weight or load. Because of this approach it was very easy to hide all mechanical stuff and LEGO® Power Functions® in between both beams. Hiding the Battery Box on the other hand seemed almost impossible. So here is what I did: I knew that the part of the trailer from the kingpin to where the wheels are attached to needs to be sturdy, it transports stress caused by the weight of the trailer itself and its load to both king pin and rear axles. The tail part of the trailer could be weaker so I decided to lower the beams at this part. This allowed me to hide the Battery Box and by accident because of its location it could easily hold the rear impact guard. The super singles I referred to are a little larger which would force me to use the wheels as in the Black Cat LEGO® set 5571. These I don't have before all else and I don't want to invest in as well because of the excessive price. Further more I really love the impressiveness of how a semi-truck and semi-trailer combination might be referred to in the United States: An eighteen-wheeler. So four super singles is not an option at all, four dualies had to be mounted! Some following trailers I build after I finished the first version of this trailer in 2009 had smaller wheels mounted. The largest advantage of the use of these smaller wheels is that it reduces the trailer's total weight and frictions. All of this makes it easier to be towed by the tractor and therefore the playability is expanded. As suggested before the alternating Red and White retroreflective strips had to be on my model as well, but without the use of stickers or decals. It just had to be replicated by adding Red and White 1 x 2 plates, but without compromising the trailer's strength. In between every set of Red and White plates a Blue plate 1 x 2 "with handle on side" is located. Real live drop deck trailers are usually equipped with fixed or sliding winches to secure loads. These are used to tie down the load so that it won't move during transport. So there the Blue plate 1 x 2 "with handle on side" became very handy. These are used to tie down the load with the use of LEGO® Chains 5L or 21L or any kind of rubber band. In my judgement a model comes to live by adding details. The more the better, but don't over do this, it will finally work against it. Finally I installed running lights which are on both sides of this trailer. The purpose of course is to increase the trailer's visibility and its looks. The landing gear it self was not that hard to came up with and I started with a manual operated version. It didn't take that much to decide to make it remote controlled. The beams on the trailer do have this space in between of four studs, so hiding the M motor and the IR Receiver are not that hard. Even though the IR Receiver does have two connectors I forced my self to combine both parking break and landing gear. The first version of this trailer had a landing gear that swings up and down. Nice concept, but not flexible when it comes to connecting to trucks with different fifth wheel heights. The trailers front end can be raised or lowered to make it connect to the fifth wheel. Developing the truck's fifth wheel I used a 3L axle with stud as kingpin. The kingpin does not only keep the trailer attached to the truck horizontally, but vertically as well. This means going over a bump should not make the driver loosing the trailer. From the very beginning of building truck and trailer models I planned on being able to combine any truck and trailer I build. With my first approach of the landing gear as described in this topic it was harder. It had to be achieved by making sure that all trailers king pin, landing gear and suspension are all on the same height. As well as making sure the fifth wheel is at the same height. Now the trailer can just be aligned with the truck easily. To give you an idea of how the instructions for this model will look like here is a preview. Creating these instructions both quick progress on your build and being easy to understand were the main goals. Early in the building process you will see what it is that you are building. You will be very excited from the moment you start the build of Trailer Tr2 MkII till you finish it with a total number of parts of about 1100 pieces. To achieve this a lot of floating items are used, with added arrows to show where these items are suppose to be. Together with a lot of so called call outs (the smaller windows within a step that shows the assembling of a smaller sub part of the build) together with multi part steps (not only one part at a time) the build will be in a flow. Check mocplans for the instructions and rebrickable for the parts list!
  20. I have been releasing a couple of rebuild in the last couple of months. This has been very satisfying also because of the building instructions I released with them. So many enthusiastic people all around the glove are building my MOCs. Never the less, here is a completely new build: Model "Trailer Tr10" is build with LEGO® in scale 1:17,5 and motorized using LEGO® Power Functions. It is not build after a specific brand or type of trailer. This build represents the well known typical US style spread or split axle flatbed trailer. Another custom design that comes with building instructions and inventory/parts list! Never did I hide my preference for flatbed and log trailers. Basically because this adds the most playability to a build. Once I build this refer and even though it was much fun building, there was no fun running around with it. The weight of this model exceeds the limits of what my semi-trucks are designed to haul. So that I why I build another flatbed, this time without a drop in its deck. Again does this build feature full solid axle suspension on both axles, three sets of lights, kingpin, remotely controlled landing gear and parking break and many details, but it also features toolboxes and a remotely controlled liftable rear axle. Even though it is not very common for this type of trailer to have a liftable rear axle I implemented it anyways. Mainly because of two reasons: A) One channel of the PF IR Receiver is used to operate the landing gear which engage/disengage the parking brake simultaneously. One channel was left to be used. Obviously the second one is used to raise and lower the liftable rear axle. B) The more tires means more rubber equals more friction. To reduce the drawback of it when it comes to playability the most rear axle is liftable. What basically happens is this mechanism forces the suspension to bottom out. Where normally weight would engage the suspension to act now there is this lever that does the work. For this reason this axle is sprung soft, but the the first axle is sprung hard. With the second axle lifted the first axles has to be stiff enough to bare the trailers empty weight. The axle setup of a spread axle trailer is not just randomly picked. It really has a purpose and it all is related to weight. Commonly this axle configuration is mostly found on flatbeds, car haulers and refrigerated trailers. As described this is a typical US style trailer. Cheers, Ingmar Spijkhoven
  21. Presenting my latest MOC US Truck T2 MkII with instructions some people came with a question I did not expect. Never the less is this question fare enough: what about the frame. Some people are interested in the frame or chassis only and why not, I can imagine... :-) So here they are, the instructions for only the frame of my latest MOC: US Truck T2 MkII Hopefully this helps for some people to buy the instructions, without a lot of unwanted information. It may be obvious, but to make sure, you could easily build this frame in for example black. Black parts are much more common and a lot of Technic builders who have earlier sets have plenty of black parts... Cheers and enjoy building..., Ingmar Spijkhoven This is only the frame of an earlier released model. A model of a US truck with LEGO® Power Functions®. This truck is revered to as US Truck T2 MkII which is a rebuild and revised version of US Truck T2 I finished back in 2009. Like with all my models this truck's frame is build in scale 1:17,5. This model features: solid axle suspension on all axles, PF powered driving with power transmitted independently to both rear axles, Ackermann geometry on steering axle, Servo powered steering, fully functional fifth wheel and 1 set of PF lights. To give you an idea how these instructions look like here is a preview. Creating these instructions both quick progress on your build as well as each step being easy to understand the same time were very important. Early in the building process you will see what is happening, what it is that you are building. You will be very excited from the moment you start till you finish the build of this chassis with a total number of parts of about 800 pieces. To achieve this a lot of floating items are used, with added arrows to show where these items are suppose to be. Together with a lot of so called call outs (the smaller windows within a step that shows the assembling of a smaller sub part of the build) together with multi part steps the build will be in a flow. Included you'll find a parts overview. You rather want to use the parts list shown at rebrickable.com! Both building instructions and a parts list are available!
  22. Toltomeja

    [MOC] Route 66

    And here it is... Finally! I have the joy and honour to present you my last work. The legendary Route 66 connecting Chocago and Los Angeles, traversing wild deserts of Arizona. I tried to include everything that makes the US American - a bar, gas station, typical truck and Harley motorcyclits. Okay, enough words. Let's watch the pics: Some more photos will come as soon as Brickshelf staff removes all the naked women pics out of my gallery. And just as a fun-fact. It's actually the biggest MOC so far and te first attempt to build cars. So now I can finally get to do something else... Yay! Have a nice journey!