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Found 15 results

  1. icm

    An Excess of X-Wings!

    When I was a kid wasting time browsing Brickshelf, I always liked X-wings most. I had a mental list of custom X-wings I liked best and I wanted an X-wing just like them. But I wasn't willing to break up my sets to make a custom X-wing like the amazing ones on Brickshelf, so I never got one. As an adult wasting time browsing Flickr, I always like X-wings most. I have a mental list of custom X-wings I like best and I want an X-wing just like them. But I'm not willing to break up my sets to make a custom X-wing like the amazing ones on Flickr, so I'm never going to get one. Oh, what the heck. It's been 20 years now that I've wanted a super awesome custom X-wing so I should just go ahead and get one. I'm an adult now. I don't need to ask anybody's permission, I should just do it. Show that I can get something done in my life, even if it's as unimportant in the grand scheme of things as a silly little Lego build. But there are so many good ones! How can I pick just one! Obviously I should make my own custom design that takes all the best parts of the best models and corrects the worst parts. But that would take a LOT of hard work and trial and error ... a friend of mine built his very own custom X-wing design in 2018 and it consumed him for months. So, like a fool, I spent money instead of time (though time is money) and just, um, built them all. (Though I'd note that there are at least a dozen more great X-wings on the internet that I'd also like to build .... ) Full Flickr album here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/149520828@N02/albums/72177720298365006. I apologize for the bad photography, I don't have a light box or a nice place to take pictures outside. My very own little T-65 X-wing, based on a childhood makeshift (1998ish, 2021) This one is an idealization of the makeshift X-wing I built as a little kid without a lot of parts, either before or shortly after the first set came out. I remember using the 4x9 wedge plate in red to form the nose, and using that shape of windscreen in trans-light blue with that top hatch, and that I used 2x6 plates for the wings. This takes the concept of that old childhood build and makes it like an actual retail set. It's about the same size as the 4+ X-wing sets, though not quite as simple. My very own design for a T-65 X-wing retail set circa 1983 This one is all mine! It bears no debt whatsoever to any other X-wing ever made. It's my impression of what an X-wing set would have looked like if it had been released in 1983 to tie in with Return of the Jedi, instead of in 1999 to tie in with The Phantom Menace. Some molds come from as late as 1987, but it seems fair to me to imagine those molds being made in 1983 for this set, since the 1999 set used an awful lot of new molds. The canopy uses sticker strips cut from unused sticker sheets. I really like the brick-built R2-D2. The contemporary finger hinges are too weak to hold the wings up or down on their own, so pneumatic tees are connected to modified plates and sandwiched between 4x1 hinge plate assemblies. They swing in and prop the wings apart when they're open, and rails near the top and bottom of the aft fuselage prevent the wings from opening too far. A 2x2 plate at the base of each lower wing provides enough clutch power to keep the wings together and level when they're closed, but not so much that the wings are hard to open. Like any 1983 set, this uses the Classic Space landing legs, and the contemporary Classic Space canopy works really well for the X-wing - so well that Dan Nelson used it independently in 1997 and Mike Psiaki used it again in 2011. This is much smaller than most custom X-wings, but it's still a very substantial size for swooshing and play, and it feels like a good size relative to the minifig. It's got a spacious cockpit and it's easy to get the pilot and droid in and out. It's also very close to the size of contemporary Lego spaceships in 1983, 1985, and 1987, so it's not too large to imagine as a 1983 set. So yeah - there are many custom X-wings out there, and this is my humble contribution to the field! Dan Nelson T-65, 1997 This is actually 98% My Own Creation, but I'm crediting Dan Nelson because it's heavily inspired by Dan Nelson's childhood makeshift X-wing circa 1997. This is my imagination for what an X-wing set would look like circa 1997 if it had been released to tie in with the Special Edition movies rather than with The Phantom Menace. I've swapped out some old molds that are now very expensive on Bricklink for their modern counterparts - which mostly means swapping finger hinges for modern 3.18mm clip hinges. I really like the brick-built R2-D2. There's room for storage accessed from a hatch on the rear fuselage step, like in Dan Nelson's version - a rare feature in custom X-wings. The canopy framing is white strips cut from unused sticker sheets. Mark Chan T-65, 2001 Back in the old days of Brickshelf, when the world was young, this was an X-wing I really admired. I still think it's pretty neat, nice and sturdy and detailed, but its proportions are a bit off. As with all the other X-wings, I've swapped some old molds for new ones in this build. Mark Chan posted an all-new fully modern X-wing to Flickr in 2018, but I actually don't particularly like that one, so I made no effort to copy it. Niko T-65, 2003 This one is a very lightweight and simple X-wing, mainly notable for not having upside-down lower wings. The proportions are bad and it can't fit a complete droid, but it's lightweight and sturdy, so it's good for swooshing. It's notable that Mark Chan, Niko, and Bruce Lowell all posted their X-wings with simple nose taper before Lego released the set 4502 with simple nose taper, just as fan-built X-wings used 4w cylinders for the engines long before Lego finally used them in set 75218 in 2018. Bruce Lowell T-65, 2003 Back when Brickshelf was the leading place on the internet to post your Lego creations, before Bricklink was as useful and well known as it is today, Bruce Lowell's X-wing was the best! It was copied as widely in its day as Mike Psiaki, Tom Loftus (Inthert), or Jerac's X-wings have been, in no small part because like them, Bruce Lowell posted step-by-step instructions for how to build it. For instance, David Low's excellent "Minifig Collector Scale" X-wing from 2006 is, upon close inspection, a lightly modified Bruce Lowell, so I chose not to build that one. This one is bigger than Mark Chan and Niko's X-wings, but not quite as big as Brian Tobin's, and smaller than any modern X-wing. The build is very sturdy and has excellent proportions and detail. The hexagonal profile and detailed greebling of the aft fuselage was unsurpassed for eight years, until Mike Psiaki posted his famous X-wing in 2011. As with other old X-wings in this collection, I've swapped some old molds for new ones. The problem with this X-wing is the wing opening geometry - opposite wings don't line up very well, so it's not a very convincing X. Brian Tobin T-65v3, 2004 Brian Tobin continuously upgraded his childhood makeshift X-wing from 1983 until 2001, but never managed to get the wings to actually open! His is the most prominent old "big" X-wing I can find pictures for on the internet. The last Brian Tobin X-wing was this one, which was heavily inspired by set 4502. As with other X-wings in this album, I've swapped out some old molds for new ones. I've also included a very large cargo space behind the seat for Luke's Dagobah camping gear, which is a rare feature for custom X-wings. The problem with this model is that the wing geometry is altered from the 4502 set such that it no longer works! The wing jacks get caught on the engine cylinder pieces and are unable to open the wings. You have to open the wings manually and rotate the wing jacks between them. Also, the rubber bands aren't strong enough to hold the wings open and closed with this geometry, so the wings flop about a lot. I copied the geometry faithfully though, so I guess Brian Tobin's build must have had the same problem. Despite its flaws, Brian Tobin's X-wing was one of the best on the internet between 2004 and 2011. This is the largest of the pre-2016 X-wings, but still smaller than any modern X-wing. Mike Psiaki T-65v3, 2011 When this X-wing appeared in 2011, it made an earthquake in the AFOL community. It wasn't the first X-wing with true center-pivot wings, but it was the first one to have true center-pivot wings and complex nose taper, and its use of the old Classic Space canopy was ingenious. Thanks to Mike Psiaki's generous posting of full instructions on Brickshelf, this was the most widely copied X-wing from 2011 to 2016. Various adaptations used the windscreen from set 7140 or the windscreen from set 75102, or turned it into a T-70. It's a little smaller than modern X-wings of the latest generation. The canopy uses strips of white sticker material cut from unused sticker sheets. Unfortunately, the nose is a little fragile. The geometry isn't exact, so it takes a little persuasion to stay there. I don't think anybody is building Psiaki X-wings anymore: the key parts for the build, the hinge plates that form the side of the nose, cost me $6 each on Bricklink. Ouch! Jerac T-65v1, 2018 Jerac's original T-65 has set the standard for the last four years, with good reason. Although it's fragile during construction, it knits together very well and is surprisingly sturdy afterwards - except for the lower aft fuselage step and the 4w engine cylinders. Unfortunately, the lower aft fuselage step is so fragile that it's hard to grip the model near the center of gravity, and the 4w engine cylinders have such a fragile connection that you can't open the wings to their full range of motion without having one or more engine cylinders pop off. (I can't anyway.). The greebling on top of the aft fuselage leaves something to be desired too. It's so shallow that I don't find it very convincing. The retractable landing gear works well, but the hinges are inadequately supported and prone to detaching unless treated very gingerly, and it's a bit tricky to reattach them. Koen Zwanenburg T-65, 2019 Koen Zwanenburg posted the Studio file for this on Eurobricks for a few days, but he removed it after Brick Vault complained that he was affecting their sales of the instructions for Jerac's 2018 version. In fact, the build is completely different. The brick built Red 5 stripes on the wings are excellent. The 4w engine cylinder mounts are much improved, so the wings can be opened to their full extent, which is wider than on the Jerac model, without losing anything. The aft fuselage profile is a much nicer hexagon. The lower aft fuselage and aft fuselage step are much stronger than on the Jerac model, but at the cost of losing the nice SNOT tiled underside. The landing gear doors are simpler and theoretically stronger, but I still end up having to take them off any time I want to get the landing gear out, so it doesn't actually end up much better than the Jerac model in that respect. The nose construction is much simplified, with no attempt at achieving the subtle bank of the sides; instead, they're straight vertical. The nose cone isn't attached to the nose side panels with Mixel joints as in the Jerac model, but is mounted on a rigid pole extended from the cockpit. This theoretically should make the structure simpler and stronger, but in practice it makes it much harder to assemble and much more fragile when assembled, because the parts remain under high stress rather than having flexible joints that accomodate the stress. The big cylindrical bases of the wing guns are modified from Marshal Banana's modified Jerac X-wing. Chris Ehnot T-65v3, 2020 After Tom Loftus's (Inthert's) revolutionary T-65v2 in 2016, Chris Ehnot was the first to post a fully modern X-wing with the windscreen from 75102, paneled/tiled nose sides, and 4w engine cylinders. He revised his build over three years - this is copied from his version 3, posted in 2020. Like Koen Zwanenburg's model, this one has wings that open wider than Jerac's without popping off the engine cylinders. Though it looks similar externally, the build is completely different than in Jerac v1, Jerac v2, or Koen Zwanenburg. It's distinguished by several subtleties of shape compared to those. Baby bows are used on the bottom of the fuselage to suggest the subtle angles on the bottom, where the filming model is in fact not flat. The wedges beside the engine cylinders are more smoothly integrated into the wing and have a subtle edge above the plane of the wing as on the filming model. Behind the engines, there are the little jigsaw-tabs that are almost always omitted on custom X-wings. The upper aft fuselage has a nice depth of greebling, and has the small, limited 45-degree sloped edge that characterizes the original ANH filming models, but which is lacking from the full-size model used in the ESB Dagobah crash scene and from the Special Edition CGI models. Because Chris Ehnot's model has no rear landing gear, it can have four complete engine cylinders for a better look underneath. The modeling that connects and smooths the junction of the aft fuselage and nose is very detailed and subtle. Unfortunately, this is also the most fragile X-wing model in the collection, such that it can hardly be touched in order to take photographs. Jerac T-65v2, 2022 Jerac's T-65v2 is the best X-wing of the lot. It's amazingly sturdy, unlike all the other fully modern X-wings with the post-2015 canopy part and 4w engine cylinders, and easy to build too. The nose knits together very well, and the line of panels on the side is completely level and unstepped, unlike on the Jerac T-65v1, the Koen Zwanenburg, and the Chris Ehnot models. The worm gear box is amazing. It holds the wings steady as a rock when open and when closed. The back engine extensions are held on very steady. The Ninjago sais and candles work very well to simulate the flashback suppressors at the tips of the laser cannons and the varying diameter of the gun barrels. It's easier to get the pilot in and out than on the previous model, and the droid. The bottom of the forward fuselage is covered better than on the old model. Most importantly, the aft fuselage step, which was previously very fragile, is now much simplified and completely solid, and the 4w engine cylinders, which previously popped off tremendously easy, no longer do, even though the wings open wider with the new mechanism than they did with the old version. The greebling on the top of the aft fuselage is also much improved, and there's even greebling on the sides of the fuselage between the wing jacks! Also, there's added greebling inside the wings on the engine "shadows", and representation of the "greeble panels" at two stations along the wingspan. The rear landing gear is now fully supported, so the hinges won't pop off if you press down on them too hard. While some subtleties of shape are lost on the lower aft fuselage compared to the previous version, the tailcone has the proper subtle 7-sided shape for the first time. The visible gaps on the sides of the nose cone leave something to be desired though. Jerac T-70, 2022 This is nearly unmodified from the Brick Vault instructions, with just a couple small color swaps on the nose. It's a surprisingly easy build and very sturdy. The nose knits together extremely well. The worm gear mechanism for the wings is amazing. They hold their position steady as a rock either open or closed. The visible gaps on the sides of the nose cone leave something to be desired though. All of them together! I don't have enough room to take a really well-staged fleet shot, so this will have to do. By the door: Chris Ehnot 2016-2020. On stands: Jerac T-65v2 2022, Jerac T-70 2022. Left column, front to back: my 1983 set concept, Dan Nelson 1997, Niko 2003, Brian Tobin 2004, Jerac T-65v1 2018. Right column, front to back: my little X-wing 2021, Mark Chan 2001, Bruce Lowell 2003, Mike Psiaki 2011, Koen Zwanenburg 2019.
  2. Ok as i'm fed up with seeing all these damn brickshelf topics everytime the site goes down (Oh no it's gone down again...it's the end of the world!!! |-/ ), i have decided to pin just one simple thread. If you have concerns on the site etc then post here and DO NOT make another thread about it, anyone who does will see a very pissed off *vader* .
  3. Just noticed that Brickshelf is migrating data to a new server station. It has hosted a 'countless' amount of files since it first launched in 1998.
  4. I know this is Eurobricks, (Not all photos are relationed with Brickshelf) But if is there a Moderator-Admin of Brickshelf, just let me know. A time ago (Near a year) I created a Brickshelf account. I made all the steps, and they should send me a email. The Problem?: The mail never come to my email. And I revised all the Folders, including the Spam. I sent a email to the brickshelf support (support@brickshelf.com) several times. But they never answer to me. As the time of today, I'm whitout my account.
  5. BrickWild

    Whatever happened to Majhost?

    Have you ever heard of Majhost, the non-Lego counterpart of Brickshelf? Does anyone on here know what happened to it? I remember when it went 'Down for Maintenance' early last year and nothing has happened since then. There are thousands of pictures on here just waiting to go down the drain within just a few weeks! Thanks.
  6. Posting Deeplinked Images from Brickshelf A Tutorial Welcome! Posting an image on Eurobricks is easy, as long as you know where it is. If you already know how to locate the proper URL (address) of your image, skip to step 6 to learn how to post it. When that image is stored on Brickshelf, it's absolutely necessary to get the exact address where the picture is stored before trying to post it. The only way to do that is through deeplinking, which also makes it possible to show images before their folder has been moderated, an added advantage. Fortunately, it's simple: just follow these easy steps. NOTE: These images were taken from Firefox. Different browsers may look different, but the steps involved are the same. 1. Go to www.brickshelf.com and log in to your account. The red circle indicates where to log in. If the file isn't yours, find the account of the user you wish to share the picture from and go there instead. The blue circle offers two ways to search for the user or image. 2. Click the folder that the image is stored in. If it is in a subfolder, click that and keep navigating until you see a thumbnail (tiny image) of the picture you want, then move to the step 3. 3. Find the picture you want to show in your post and click it. 4. You should now see the picture you want. After you click it again, it will look like Step 5. 5. Copy the URL (location) of the image from the address bar of your browser, which is shown here circled in red. The easiest way is to rightclick and select "copy". If you know how to post an image, you can skip the rest and go use the URL you just copied. Good job! 6. Return to the post you are editing and press the "Insert Image" icon. Paste the URL from earlier in the new box. In this example, you're about to post a sigfig to the "Your Sig-fig" thread. 7. Finish your post and submit it. All done! You've now added a deeplinked picture to your post. Congratulations!
  7. talos

    Brickshelf

    I was wondering if very many use or look at Brickshelf? I was trying to create an account there, and it was kind of frustrating. It seems a bit stuck in the 90's. Trying to make a strong password, was pretty much useless, since nearly all the special characters were not allowed. I set up an account, and was told to wait for an email to validate it, but still haven't received anything. I am wondering if it was automated or not, and I am actually waiting for someone to manually approve me, and send the message. Do you regularly go to that site? I wonder if its worth the bother to try and use it.
  8. -Horizon-

    Brickshelf Help?

    I signed up for Brickshelf last Sunday and they said they would send me a confirmation e-mail so I've waited till yesterday and then I tried to sign up again. I entered my e-mail address and it said that this e-mail is already signed up. So I said ok and tried to log in, and it aid this account is not active yet. So I'm asking the Eurobricks community, How long did it take you to get your brickshelf confirmation e-mail? Thank You for reading, lego3364
  9. When at Brickworld Chicago I saw an extremely detailed moving truck which is down here Today I found the Brickshelf account of this amazing builder and his other creations are just as amazing More pictures for all these models here http://www.brickshelf.com/cgi-bin/gallery.cgi?m=Marat
  10. What are the reference pages you know?. I just know a few technic ones, I would like to know about great MOC builders in another themes, we can always learn something new to use. To know more technic pages would be good too, I always recomend the same page, http://www.brickshelf.com/cgi-bin/gallery.cgi?m=everyonesgrudge in my opinion it has many fewer visits than it deserves because of lack of upgrade.
  11. Was browsing Brickshelf today and came across this masterpiece...honestly on my all-time favorites list. The builder, going by 'KidA' made this amazing GT86 MOC, with very intricate suspension and some of the best bodywork I have ever seen. His other builds include RC builds similar to mine, but with the official Lego Radio Control system. This car in particular is so great it has inspired me to start a new project I've had on hold for a while (another vehicle) testing some ideas I've had. Here are some photos and a link to his Brickshelf: (sorry if photos are too large) Link to the MOC folder: GT86 I have never seen him mentioned here and I would love to discuss the model in-depth if anyone knows him. EDIT: Found a video!
  12. tobiasz-gallery posted the Enterprize on Brickshelf. more pics at http://www.brickshel...ry.cgi?f=538712
  13. o0916781930 posted his pirate ship on Brickshelf. More pics in his BS folder: http://www.brickshel...ry.cgi?f=526078
  14. [pid][/pid]232C I Found this great MOC on Brickshelf by user Regolo59. It even has a secret cave for the pirates to hide thier booty!! Damn crocodiles!!! Check it out here!! - crypte mysterieuse
  15. [pid][/pid]228C Brickshelf user Choking-Hazards has created this excellent rendition of the classic pirate design!! Gallery: Jolly-Roger