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Found 2 results

  1. TLDR: Super-detailed fully-modularized Creator-scale 16-wide MOC build of epic multiple-championship-winning early-90s IMSA GTP prototype. 1007 pieces (including 4 round-plates-with-strings, 6 pneumatic tubes, 1 hose, and 8 “non-Lego” custom parts). 1/15 scale: 17 stud wide (ish), 40 stud long, 22 stud wheelbase October 2nd, 2018 marks the 25th anniversary of the IMSA GTP championship’s last race. This is the car that won. –––––– The mid-1980's were a boom time for American sports car racing. The IMSA GTP series was thick with manufacturers and strong privateer teams running Porsche, Jaguar, BMW, Chevrolet, Buick, Ford, Mazda, Acura, Nissan, and Toyota power integrated into myriad different chassis designs. Swelling budgets and fierce competitiveness forced materials and electronics technologies to evolve at a rapid pace. Dan Gurney and his All American Racers team had been on a learning curve with sports cars which really started heating up with the beastly GTO-class Toyota Celica. Their foray into big-league prototypes came first with an adaptation of a Group C based Toyota 88C and then the team's own 962-inspired HF89. These all helped to forge reliable power from Toyota’s 2.1 liter twin-cam 4cyl and teach many valuable lessons in designing and building a robust and competitive car. The MkIII debuted in 1991, entering into arguably the most competitive of GTP's seasons. The now-mighty little Toyota engine was connected to a compact carbon-fiber space-capsule wrapped in an achingly-simple shape which hid massive aero tricks. Dominance quickly followed with 21 victories in 27 races entered over three seasons. The glory of the series wasn't to last. By 1993, a global recession and conflicting technical regulations thinned the field such that at the end of the GTP era, Dan’s team was effectively left battling itself. For what it’s worth, I don’t believe this is the “car that killed GTP”… Successful racing series don’t die because a team or a car dominate, that’s what heads-up rulemakers govern and what motivated competitors rise to challenge. These guys were just the last ones standing as top-tier sports-car racing collapsed worldwide. ______ The exterior build posed a few challenges, mostly in capturing the layered smoothness of the nose and weaving slopes together to form the severe cutaway area aft of the front wheels. One of the things which has made me reluctant to work at this scale in Lego is the lack of an elegant solution for the heavily-curving windscreens and rear cowls found on prototypes. I wanted to capture the smooth simplicity of the MkIII’s shape without doing complex arrays of slope parts for the glass and engine cover so these surfaces are done as single-piece sheet elements designed to lock into the Lego framework (much like the recent minifig camping tent or Forma fish... anyone remember the City windsurfer?). These few non-TLG exterior parts plus the handmade BBS wheel centers are why strict Lego-only purists should probably think of this a “hybrid scale model”… Pull off the bodywork, though, and it’s 100% TLG. The MkIII's chassis has layers of very clever engineering done with a beautiful aesthetic of carbon fiber, kevlar, bare exotic metals, spindly gray-painted suspension arms, and amazing red-anodized fixing points throughout. It’s very purposeful but also very cohesive and elegant. This translates into an opportunity for some excellent Lego part and color usage. My primary goal for this model was to render a study of the engineering under the skin and to capture the modularity of prototypes as much as possible. There’s the core monocoque tub and a separate drivetrain, with further modules for the ducted side pods, doors, front splitter, bodywork, wing, etc. Hung off the chassis at all four corners is a suspension of bars and clips locating #90202 Technic wheel hubs. The driveline build captures the MkIII’s key features: the semi-structural and heavily-turbocharged Toyota 503E engine, the big red anodized mounting plates, the tall trapezoidal magnesium bellhousing which serves as the oil tank and rear suspension rocker-arm mounting structure, and the long load-bearing plates for the rear wing. This rear half of the model is mounted to the tub as in the full-scale car: plates at the top and base of the engine plus struts locating the central suspension structure. Despite all this modularity, the model builds up to be very solid. The cockpit is complete too; the seat, steering wheel, digital dash, switch panel, giant boost knob and handy “hardwood” shift-knob are all tucked in there. Other details inside include the bulkhead-mounted electronic engine-management modules and the front suspension's lower trailing-arm mounting. More photos up at Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/prototyp/ As always, thanks for looking and thanks for the inspiration, Prototyp ______ References and inspiration Malte Dorowski : for just how detailed and accurate this scale can be. Sir.Manperson : detailed Creator-scale car builds, and particularly his bars n clips suspension. Senator Chinchilla : engine builds, in particular his technique of wrapping hoses as turbos. Want to read more about the MkIII? Here are interviews with the MkIII’s design team by Mulsanne Mike (with some photos from my visit to AAR): http://www.mulsannescorner.com/ToyotaEagleMkIII.html Essential reading "Prototypes" J.A. Martin & Ken Wells "GTP Race Cars" J.A. Martin & Michael Fuller
  2. Francois' Hardware Store || The Pit || The Asylum I always wanted to make some Modular MOCs but the prospect of the huge pool of available parts seemed daunting. Then a couple of brick orders didn't go exactly the way I expected and so I decided to make the best out of it and try to redesign some of the Modulars as 16 wide buildings. Whether it is because you don't have enough space in your town, or you want a use for a duplicate set you somehow got, or maybe you're just tired of looking at the official model, these alternate builds are a great way to utilize the parts from the original sets. I'm hoping that this will also inspire other would-be-MOCers to try their hand at alternate models as I think they are a perfect way to reuse the bricks. And for me personally the restrictions of the available parts makes it more focused and promotes creativity. I am hoping eventually to redesign all of the Modulars, potentially with the exception of the Pet Shop which is basically already done. So without further ado, I would like to present the first two buildings: Francois' Hardware Store (alternate build of the Fire Brigade), The Pit (alternate build of the Palace Cinema) and The Asylum (alternate build of the Cafe Corner): Francois' Hardware Store The idea behind this one was to reuse all of the equipment from the Fire Brigade in a way that makes sense. A store was the obvious choice as you can display the items as merchandise. The owner is an avid artist who displays his paintings throughout the house as decoration. Lots of furniture, both new and old, fill out the interior and a homemade sculpture adorns the facade. The Pit For the Palace Cinema alternate build, I wanted to really move as far away from the original's look as possible. While the color scheme is obviously limited by the bricks available in the original, there is a substantial amount of blue plates that can be used for accents. Combined with a departure from the original style to the Detective's Office layout, I believe this building can fulfil a very different function in a town layout as well as appeal to people who dislike the Cinema's unique style. In terms of interesting features, I was forced to use a brick-built door for the entrance to the first floor as there was no space for stairs on the ground floor and there is only one actual door piece in the original model. In the end it worked out quite well and it can be easily opened and closed without leaving unsightly gaps, but at the cost of being a tad too wide. There is also a "sliding" french window in the apartment leading out to the balcony. Another interesting problem was the lack of a 16w baseplate. In order to be a "true" alternate model, I didn't want to use one from a different set so instead I managed to find a way to create a pseudo-baseplate from the leftover plates in the set. The main disadvantage here is that the ground is thicker than a standard baseplate, so I would suggest you change it into a standard baseplate if you have a spare one (or use the spare one from the Fire Brigade, if you're building both of the above). The Asylum This particular building highlights how many different parts we often forget about or misremember when it comes to large builds. If you take a look at the stock Cafe Corner modular building, you'll see very little blue. It's prominently featured on the ground floor, though mostly obstructed by other features. The upper floors don't really have any visible blue at all. When doing an alternate model, I try to move as far as possible from the original, because using the same colors automatically evokes the image of the two buildings being related. The Asylum is the first of my MOCs to have a simple story tied to it. Anisse comes in to seek help from doctor Tim E. Discants, but his treatments are not exactly orthodox. The first floor features an admission counter and a White room, intended to hold the patients and keep them from injurying themselves. The second floor houses the Extraction room, enabling the good doctor to extract the "disease" from his patients. That leaves them ready for the Operating room. Suffice it to say, once the patients experience the treatments, they look for any way out. Check out my post further down or click on the link above for more pictures and the full story. More to come soon hopefully! Let me know if there's a specific Modular you would want to see 16ed.