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Found 2 results

  1. My LEGO model of Sabine River and Northern 408 is below the short handrail, just behind the access ladder. This MOC is based on a real loco, one of five NC class switchers built by Electro-Motive Corporation. (which later became EMD when it was bought by General Motors) Some of these five locomotives had General Electric electrical equipment, while others had Westinghouse, since EMC's own designs were not yet ready. Wikipedia doesn't have a lot to say on the NC class (it doesn't even have it own page!), but it does give us the history of this specific loco which is the last of it's class (as far as I know): 'EMC S/N 651 (built May 1937): Youngstown and Northern Railroad 202, to Elgin, Joliet and Eastern Railroad 408 in April 1946, to Marinette, Tomahawk & Western Railroad 408, then finally to the Sabine River and Northern Railroad as 408 before being preserved in the National Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri.' In addition, the engine's plaque at the museum says it cost $91,500 when new, and arrived at the museum in 1974. During the summer months, you can climb into the cab... although it is a very steep climb. The Lego model was heavily inspired by a SW1500 (which is a later cousin to the NC type) model I saw here. You can also read more about the Sabine River and Northern here on Wikipedia. I couldn't possibly get Sabine River and Northern to fit on the long hood, so just initials were placed instead. I also used a new printed 1x6 tile from set 60401 (Construction Steamroller) near the cab door. Thoughts?
  2. This railway engine shed was mostly inspired by user @lightningtiger, who designed the basic Technic frame on his own smaller shed for his town in 2018, and I ran with the technique to create this wooden western-style steam locomotive shed. It is also slightly inspired by by the shed used to store the replica Union Pacific "119" and Central Pacific "Jupiter" 4-4-0 steam locomotive's over at the Golden Spike National Historic Park. (link is to Wikipedia article on the site) located at Promontory Summit, Utah. The shed is 3 1/2 tracks long with a total of 56 studs from back wall to the leading edge of the baseplate. (I ordered 3D printed half-track segments for the model, which aren't in LDD. The model shown uses a full length straight instead, and is thus much longer than it will actually be when finished.) The building also features a cow skull on the front between the locomotive stalls, just to give it that Wild West flair. The roof of the shed is not removable, but it can fold open a bit on clips on either side. The model neatly fits both 4-4-0's I recently made that were inspired by 7597. (These loco's also are heavily inspired by 119 and Jupiter, in case you couldn't tell!) The rear of the shed features a personnel door for workers. Up on the roof, you may have noticed those round black things: they are the vents for smoke and soot from steam engines to exit the building. Slight update to train shed as of 7/14/22: The 3D printed half-track pieces I bought didn't want to attach to the baseplate properly, so they have been removed. Also, the 8x16 bricks were hitting the side-rods of the steam locomotives, so they were replaced with a multitude of 6x8 plates to lower the platform to a height where they wouldn't collide. ...And that's all I have done for now. More real world WIP pictures will comes as soon as possible. As usual, comments, complaints, and suggestions on this model welcome!