Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'moc'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Frontpage, Forum Information and General LEGO Discussion
    • Guest Section - PLEASE READ BEFORE YOU REGISTER!
    • Frontpage News
    • Forum Information and Help
    • General LEGO Discussion
    • The Embassy
  • Themes
    • LEGO Licensed
    • LEGO Star Wars
    • LEGO Historic Themes
    • LEGO Action and Adventure Themes
    • LEGO Pirates
    • LEGO Sci-Fi
    • LEGO Town
    • LEGO Train Tech
    • LEGO Technic and Model Team
    • LEGO Mindstorms and Robotics
    • LEGO Scale Modeling
    • LEGO Action Figures
    • Special LEGO Themes
  • Special Interests
    • Minifig Customisation Workshop
    • LEGO Digital Designer and other digital tools
    • Brick Flicks & Comics
    • LEGO Mafia and Role-Play Games
    • LEGO Media and Gaming
  • Eurobricks Community
    • Hello! My name is...
    • LEGO Events and User Groups
    • Buy, Sell, Trade and Finds
    • Community
    • Culture & Multimedia

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


What is favorite LEGO theme? (we need this info to prevent spam)


Which LEGO set did you recently purchase or build?


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Country


Special Tags 1


Special Tags 2


Special Tags 3


Special Tags 4


Special Tags 5


Special Tags 6


Country flag

Found 3807 results

  1. After I built my first big MOC construction vehicle, this attempt at a different kind of loader, some nine months ago (boy, time sure flies), I've been wanting to redesign it, implementing techniques and mechanisms I have learned since then, to make a better functioning, better looking, more professional build, without cutting so many corners as I did the last time. So without further ado, I present to you THE SWINGLOADER (mk II) Firstly, I had a pretty good idea in my head of how to make the setup with the PF motors, and stack the four functions I wanted on top of each other in as small a space as possible. This is the first try, which turned out okay, but neede some minor redesign during the course of the project: In the final version the top two motors are PF-L motors, that operate the lifting an tipping of the bucket (axles 2 and 3 from the top). The two lower motors are PF-M. One controls the two small LA's for turning the machine, and the other controls the turning of the digger (uppermost axle) The lowermost axle is of course the drive axle, driven by a PF-XL motor (not in this picture) Anyway, here is a couple of detailed model images and explanations: The first two shows pretty much every axle, gear, actuator and motor in the model (yes, the two top motors are IRL PF-L motors) This is the final setup I used, and as far as I can tell, is completely accurate to the final model. Here follows some pics of the individual functions First, the drivetrain and steering: The portal axle reduction gives it a nice and slow speed, but it can be increased both there, and from the motor and down to the axle. The twin small LA's gives it a nice and accurate steering (thanks again, jorgeopesi ), although I would have liked it a bit faster Also, I managed to implement a simple mechanism for a functional sttering wheel : It turns ~90 degrees to either side as the loader articulates Next up is a representation of all the three functions that go to the front: Swinging: Lifting: Tipping: And after all that was figured out, I just needed to build a shell around the thing and but on some wheels! So here it is as it stands today: TA-DAAAA: As you can see, I opted for a much smaller type loader, more akin to the ones you see on construction sites in the city and stuff, and maybe closer to the real SwingLoader brand of swinging loaders It might from the above picture seem like there is a lot of free space from the front of the loader to the bucket.. ...but this is why it has to be like that: This time around, finding a working linkage geometry didn't take nearly as long as last time (even though the entire digger is built from scratch). As you can see on the next picture, it really does tip nicely when on top The battery compartment opens like this, for easy battery replacement: And the doors open up like this, to reveal a IR-receiver/uncomfortable seat for the driver. Second to last, here is the mandatory under belly shot, nothing to fancy about it ...except for the fact that I now see I forgot to put in two 3L friction pins to attach the two yellow 3x5 L-shaped liftarms And maybe the setup for of the rear pendular suspension! I almost forgot about that Making it with two small turntables makes it extremely strong, both when it comes to supporting weight, and stress in the longitudinal direction! This is actually a key factor to the rigidity of the entire rear of the loader! :thumbup: And lastly (well almost, anyway), the tiny tiny tiny detail that makes me loose my sleep: The transmission of power to the lower axle here, as you can see, happens via a part that doesn't exist. That is the 24 tooth end of a 4L differential, that I had to sever from the rest of its body, to keep the lowermost gear from coming ever so slightly in contact with the small LA's when the loader is turning to either extreme. The setup works almost as smoothly with these replaced by 16 tooth gears, but just not quite... So to sum it all up: -Driven 4WD by PF-XL motor -Steered by PF-M motor, via two small LA's -Turning of the digger by PF-M motor, worm gear on turntable -Lifting by PF-L motor, via two LA's -Tipping by PF-L motor, via one LA -Sixth channel open for powered accessories (you can see the output in the last image) -Easy access battery box through openable engine cover -Strong pendular suspension on the rear axle -Four PF-LED lights -Openable doors to the operator's cabin -Adjustable mirrors -Unfortunately no PF-seatbelts for the driver this time All in all I am very pleased with the result, and will try to make a video as soon as possible to show off the functions! And as a final feature, I built a crane attachment, similar to the ones I've seen in pictures like this: Here it is, folded as compactly as possible: And here it is fully extended: As you can maybe spot from the above image, the crane and loader is ready to accept a powered winch somewhere, but I haven't gotten around to designing one that is easy on the eye. This is the reason I put the output from the sixth channel in the cabin, for future additions. And here it is lifting a sort of I-beam: Pheew There you have it! I think I covered most of it, but feel free to post questions, critisism, praise and suggestions on improvements! As I mentioned, I will do my best to make a video of it in action! Thanks!
  2. Rizwanul

    60051 in different livery

    Hi all I've created the discontinued Passenger Train 60051 in a dark green and orange livery. I had to put colour coordinated stickers on the train front to give it a smoother look. Riz (Sorry - problems with previous attempt to start this topic) The interior of the carriage: It needed colour coordinated stickers on the train front to give it a smoother look: The carriage:
  3. It is my second try at creating a model the way Lego does but at the same time being as sleek and faithful to original as possible. It is not a 100% MOC, because it incorporates some basic structure techniques of 75101 mixed with 75211. 759 pieces plus 56 for a display stand. Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by Barney Markowski, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by Barney Markowski, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by Barney Markowski, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by Barney Markowski, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by Barney Markowski, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by Barney Markowski, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by Barney Markowski, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by Barney Markowski, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by Barney Markowski, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by Barney Markowski, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by Barney Markowski, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by Barney Markowski, on FlickrImperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by Barney Markowski, on Flickr
  4. I've recently returned to LEGO, thanks in no small part to being given the 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS set as a birthday gift by my excellent friends. It was amazing to see how Technics sets have progressed since my childhood but was very dissapointed to find that there were no B model in the instructions. In my early days B models taught me that it was OK to pull apart a build and make something new and this was more than half the fun. Well there was nothing else for it but to make my own and here it is! The Lancia Stratos was an impressive, almost otherworldy machine that loomed large through my childhood and it seemed a fine choice for the orange parts of 42056. The wheels are the right diameter but a lot wider so they take up a lot more room inboard than the real thing and have what you might call a cheeky amount of overlap on the guards but I reckon it works here. I've kept the wheel base and track to scale. Everything opens and shuts like the original and there's a working 5 speed "H" pattern shift gearbox driving the transverse V6 in the back. You can add an additional part to activate reverse gear but this is not neccesary if you want to stay within the parts list of 42056. There are instructions available and the first chapter, the gearbox, is free so that you can see if you can work with them or not. They're available here: INSTRUCTIONS You'll find some unusual choices in terms of parts and placement but remember that this is an alternate build and the bricks available are somewhat limited. Since this is a B model and all the parts are sourced from 42056 it was tricky to get the form and functions that I wanted without too many compromises but the details of the MOC are: Dimensions : Studs = 69 x 56 x 23 cm = 55 x 44.6 x 19 Weight = 2.02 kg Part count = 2197 - 5 speed "H" pattern gearbox with optional reverse - working fake transverse V6 engine - steering via HOG that moves the wheels and steering wheel - front and rear independent suspension - openable bonnet, boot and doors I hope you like it and I'm looking forward to spending a lot of time in this community, I never knew what an AFOL was until a couple of weeks ago and now it turns out I am one - it's a brave new world for me!
  5. craigslegostuff

    X-Wing Crash On Endor!

    Photography fun in the garden... https://flic.kr/s/aHsmrfBUyN
  6. Hello All, This is an attempt to model a cool, nostalgic car from Eastern Germany, the last model of the Trabant factory in Zwickau. I have created this model as a birthday gift to my best friend who used to drive us around in a car like this in his early twenties. If you like this MOC, you can suppport it on the Lego Ideas site - thanks! https://ideas.lego.com/projects/a4bbe629-6520-44f3-ba50-318457e26255 Lego Trabant Universal 1.1 by Dan Falussy, on Flickr Backview by Dan Falussy, on Flickr Openall by Dan Falussy, on Flickr Interior by Dan Falussy, on Flickr
  7. In the past few weeks I've been busy on this beauty: Edificio Metropolis Madrid. The roof was a real pain in the #!@$, but I think it's done nicely. I've only used Google Earth and some photographs of this tourist hot-spot building in the capital of Spain. The only thing not being LEGO are the stickers with the word METROPOLIS and the Golden Arches sign of McDonald's. To watch these pictures in a larger size, please visit my folder at BrickShelf
  8. All, After more then 2 year without working on a new Technic MOC I am now ready to present my new project: A classic roadster based on a Jaguar XK120. I managed to built it in white and separate the frame and the bodywork completety. Due to this there is also a frame version with full RC. It can be build in red and black as well without major adaptations. More pictures, video and instructions to follow.... Rebrickable instructions: https://www.rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-10690/martijnnab/classic-jaguar-roadster/#comments Blog from The Lego Car Blog: https://thelegocarblog.com/2017/11/02/it-doesnt-matter-if-youre-black-or-white-2/ Blog from The Brothers-brick: https://www.brothers-brick.com/2017/11/09/jaguar-roadsters-technical-challenge/
  9. I had a spare truss bridge model lying around and thought it could use a revamp. Then I thought of the turntable I had designed, and realized it could use a transfer table companion model. Thus, this transfer table was finished just today. The whole table moves on four wheels at the edges and three guide-ways in the center. The model sits on four vintage 32 x 32 stud base-plates arranged in a square. I'm currently thinking about slicing up what's left of a gray 48 x 48 into a strip for the leading tracks to rest on. The height from the track to the top of the truss-work is a hair shorter than 13 1/3 bricks tall, which is tall enough for most locomotives but not enough for cabooses, extra-tall double stacked container cars and double-decker lounge cars. The length of the table is four tracks long, which is plenty for any of my single-unit locomotives or official LEGO models. (Diesel cab and booster units will have to be split up to fit, however.) In progress shot of me loading a 4-8-2 steam locomotive onto the table. Lining up the tracks as perfect as can be is key to keeping the loco on the rails and steady! Moving any loco sideways is easy enough to do with one hand... lining it up and rolling the engine off, however, needs steady two hands and a good eye. A better pic of it lined up at the shed track after unloading the steamer. Please NOTE: There is a two stud gap (and a bit of incline) between table and lead-in track: It is NOT 100% flat! Comments, suggestions, complaints, and compliments are always welcome!
  10. This MOC was originally planned to be a third submission for BrickFair VA 2018 - after finishing my Red Beryl GT I realized I still had a month before the expo, and seeing that I had an abundance of lime pieces I decided a CLAAS tractor would be a perfect build. However, problems soon arose when I overestimated the amount of pieces I had, and I had to begin compromising parts of the build. When I realized the number of compromises I was making would greatly hinder the model's functionality and aesthetics, I decided to put it off until after the expo. The original chassis only contained M motors, had a poorly designed rear PTO and an inaccurate fake engine. However, after taking apart my BrickFair MOCs I was able to use the two L motors on my Red Beryl GT as the propulsion motors for the tracks. They sit side by side, driving the front sprockets with a 5:1 reduction. This left ample space in the rear of the chassis for the rear PTO and elevating mechanism. I originally wanted to include an inline-6 fake engine under the hood connected to the PTO motor, but due to lack of space, concerns of overloading the front end and the absurdity of an engine connected only to the PTO, I decided to omit it and simply connect the motor to the rear PTO. A driveshaft passes down the center of the chassis linking the M motor to the PTO, with a clutch gear and 3:1 reduction at the motor. The elevating rear attachment point was a modular build, which included a worm gear driving a pair of levers that uses links to raise/lower the attachment. This mechanism also uses a M motor with clutch gear and 3:1 reduction. Despite originally being a modular element, it fit into the chassis very well. As for the aesthetics, the hood was the most challenging part to model. I spent the bulk of my work on this project before BrickFair on modeling the hood, trying to get it as close as possible to the real thing. The curvature and combination of lime/white were especially challenging, and I ended up "marking" the bottom curvature of it using lime flex axles and used System pieces at various points. It was not perfect, but I was pretty satisfied with it as to how it compared to the real thing. The cab was much easier, but getting the proper angle with the front windscreen was also quite challenging. Restricting myself to only using black axles was the main obstacle - as I could not use beams due to the angle towards the bottom of the cab. I also had to make sure the roof was not placed at an angle, since I'm not a fan of roofs that angle downward to accommodate the windscreen angle. I ended up attaching the front windscreen to the roofs with beams at an angle - not the prettiest but better than a leaning roof I guess. The rear attachment, simple as it is, was very fun to build. I decided not to go too crazy with it, so I made something similar to the mower attachment on the back of the 8284. The mower blades are manually folded with mini LAs which also allow them to be angled. The red tiles with the "DANGER" print are custom printed pieces I got at BrickFair. The model, of course, has its share of drawbacks. The main one being the rear of the tractor, as I was simply too lazy to get the complex curves back there. I used panels to sort of get the curves, and left the battery exposed in the rear. Not everyone's favorite solution, but if they do it on official sets (e.g. 8043) then whatever I suppose. The lack of larger Technic sprockets was another problem - the tracks ended up "flatter" compared to the original tractor. I initially built the tracks with pairs of oscillating sprockets to sort of prevent this look, but this proved to be very bad as it would always cause the model to tilt on its front end. I eventually connected all the sprockets to a solid beam which solved the problem, but I cannot help but think the tracks are a bit out of proportion. I also had issues with the clutch gear in the rear PTO - it slipped with too little torque. This caused the mower blades to stop when bumped against anything. Adding another clutch gear or removing them altogether would have remedied the issue, but I simply overlooked it while building. Despite not having fulfilled its original intent as a BrickFair submission, I was nevertheless very satisfied with the result. It had its drawbacks, but in my opinion this was a great experience with modeling a real vehicle. Such projects allow me to actually consider how the real thing looks before choosing what piece to use, which makes the building process much more interesting. Video: Photos:
  11. Hello everyone. Happy to present my latest MOC: LIEBHERR Concept Mobile Crane. All motorized functions: - 3 XL for propulsion (1 for each axle) - Servo for front axle steering - 1 PF L - outriggers - 1 PF M - 360 degree tower rotation - 1 PF XL - custom wormgear actuator arrow control - 1 PF M - string based second stage - 1 PF M - hook control - 1 PF lights - 2 light bricks - 1 Buwizz 2.0 - 2 battery boxes 8881 - 1 train battery box 88000 - 3 IR recievers - 1 pole reverser Manual functions: - Openable hood (V6 line engine + propeller;)) - Openable doors - Full cabin detalization for 2 persons - Openable engine compartment (inside the cabin) - Openable side compartment (access to train bb) - Openable hatch under the arrow (access to Buwizz) - Full crane cabin detalization - Openable tower engine compartment (access to BBs) MOC done in the scale of ~ 1:11. Parts counting around 7k. Tbh I lost the count somewhere around 4k when it was body only. Weight - 7 kg. Dimensions: 0,86m long (0,98m with arrow) x 0,3m width x 0,32m height. Note that: From the very beginning, it was not the purpose to make a full scale 1 to smth copy of a specific crane, but rather make a functional crane with the features of a real one. If you did not follow the topic when it was only WIP - sad to say that I had to make hard front axle because it was getting really heavy. The 2nd and 3rd axles are made as pendulum suspension with 6.5 hard shock absorbers to support. Of course with the weight all of the offroad utility was shaved down quite a lot. Drastic contrast from the original 3axle cranes is the body length and outriggers design I guess. All other mechanisms are here. More photos at: https://bricksafe.com/pages/gate/ural-4320-trial-truck/leibherr-ltm1060-3.1-mobile-crane WIP videos: To conclude this MOC: This was a really hard one, cannot even count the times I staggered in thinking of what and how to do next. But I always had general idea which helped me finish the MOC. As well as people who gave me some ideas in this topic specifically. So special thanks to @suffocation, @Erik Leppen, @BrickbyBrickTechnic! Also thanks to 42055 and 42082 for that they exist. This was a huge experience to me and the first mobile crane I've built myself. The general notes I took for myself were: - always plan outriggers before or at the early stages of the chassis; - suspension is not the best idea for a 7 kg crane; - if your model is really huge and heavy - drive it as the stages of building go, with extra weight it starts acting completely different. - think twice before naming your MOC
  12. Kozikyo86

    [MOC] First Order AT-ST Walker

    Hi! My new Lego project - First Order AT-ST based on set 75153 and 75201. The project was created in LDD. List of parts also on my FLICKR - https://flic.kr/s/aHsktg99PU Free instruction on my YouTube: Thanks! :) If you like my projects and you want more free instructions, you may want to consider a small donation :) - https://paypal.me/pools/c/80wzN4s8FI
  13. I present to you a project which has been sitting completed for some time now. The need for its parts has prompted the video below, before the machine is dismantled. Now before anyone gets too excited, this is a very rough representation of the actual machine. My main focus was on getting power transferred efficiently from a buggy motor to the side mowers, and also permitting the range of movements that are required. This would normally be accomplished with high tension belts, but I had to opt for a continuous driveline with minimum bevel gears, and maintain high efficiency. The pneumatics are pressure controlled through a switch, and facilitate the variable ground clearance on the front axle, as well as the lowering and raising of the side mowers. The batteries were a little depleted at the time of filming. All other functions are described below. Pneumatic compressor - M motor Front mower lift - M motor Front mower operation - M Motor Side mower operation - Buggy motor Mower switch on/off - Micro motor through pole reverser switches Steering - M Motor Drive - 2 XL Motors 2 PF Battery boxes are used, and three PF receivers Enjoy! I would welcome your comments.
  14. dylanfarrow

    (MOC) - The 60163 - Tornado

    "In 1972, a crack commando unit was sent to prison by a military court for a crime they didn't commit. These men promptly escaped from a maximum security stockade to the Los Angeles underground. Today, still wanted by the government, they survive as soldiers of fortune. If you have a problem, if...." No wait, that's not what I meant!! In 1990 a group of people came together to share an extraordinary ambition – to construct a brand new Peppercorn A1 Pacific. They formed The A1 Steam Locomotive Trust and after nineteen years of incredible effort that locomotive, No. 60163 Tornado, moved under its own power for the first time in 2008. - https://www.a1steam.com Having created my first MOC (link), I was keen to improve. Mostly the running performance (the pistons never worked that well), the look of the engine, the carriage, its ability through switches and the playability.... so, basically everything. Looking for inspiration on the 'net I came across 60163 in her blue livery and loved it. I had found my Emerald nights' partner steam train. 3 years later, I'm very happy to present my Blue Tornado! Full Flickr album here - Link The dual axles for the smooth running of the pistons isn't very realistic compared to the original, but this was a trade off between usability (kid proofing), smooth running and accuracy. 7 Wide for the train and carriage allows for so much more detail and usable space, but presents some tricky issues. The white lines are thin modelling stickers the rest is all genuine lego, with no modifications. Only two parts aren't in current production (in the right colours) the 6L grey axle and 'Roof tile 2x1x2' in blue. I liked the challenge of production parts only, and the lower BL cost, even though the proportions are now off. Design details: The driver wheels are inset by about 1/2 a plate into the body to make them appear bigger than they are. It also allows for a lower centre of gravity to make sure it doesn't derail at full speed around corners! The second picture also shows how I kept the top 'rail' stable whilst maintaining the colour scheme. The two single black studs on the left side are '1x1 with hole' with a 'Technic, Axle Pin 3L with Friction Ridges Lengthwise and 1L Axle' through the whole section. 3 3x2 black tiles were removed, along with the whole 'boiler' and roof of the cab (it's all one assembly). Front and rear bogies have vertical and lateral movement for non flat lego track. Couple of Youtube videos: (Part 1 (below) and Part 2) Finally I've added it to LEGO ideas. More in the hope of trying to get another Creator Expert train out of LEGO or to show that there is still love for trains in general. It'd be great to get your support :) https://ideas.lego.com/projects/fc675426-9e80-4c8b-bab3-b99be6983312
  15. craigslegostuff

    Alf's Stars 'N' Stripes Grill - redesign

    An update of my first ever MOC from couple of years ago. I decided it didn't quite fit into my layout, and as I've learned lots of new techniques since then, I decided to rebuild it. It's an American themed takeaway / grill. FIRST FLOOR: Alf's Stars N Stripes Grill - grill, rotisserie, fridge, Fanta drinks machine, seating, recycling bin. Also a door out to the back alley where there's a freezer, and also stairs up to the second floor W/C. SECOND FLOOR: Design Studio reception / W/C - A second business takes up the second and third floors: a funky and modern design studio. This is just a reception / waiting area. THIRD FLOOR: Design Studio main office - Two designers' desks, shelves with supplies, etc. Hope you enjoy. Please feel free to leave me a comment if you have any questions or comments! Craig, August 2018
  16. Still gotta add in motors and stuff, they are being used in my other moc right now. I also need to add more details to make it look more like a rally car. Its 9v battery is stored in the hood. Constructive criticism is appreciated!
  17. Psyence

    [MOC] - UCS X34 Landspeeder

    Here is project I've been toying with since November - UCS X34 Landspeeder MOC. There has been a lack of land vehicles in the UCS line-up. I built with LDD initially and after six versions I ended my journey with this - although updates are already brewing. It measures 22.5 inches in length, 15.5 inches in width and 14.5 inches in height with the stand at 2798 pieces. Would love to hear any comments or critiquing on this. I am by no means an experienced MOC builder as this is only my second MOC - the first being a UCS Tie Fighter. I had the best time doing this and I'm looking forward to my next build. Let me know what you think...https://www.flickr.c...57649885427838/If you like this MOC, feel free to "Support" it:https://ideas.lego.c.../91535/comments Lego Star Wars UCS X34 Landspeeder by aaron.fiskum, on Flickr
  18. BrickMusher

    [MOC] NOHAB Mx & My Roundnoses

    Hello everyone, today I would like so present You my NOHAB Roundnoses. The MOC´s are older, but I took new pictures and finally uploaded them to my flickr-account. Two more are WIP, but I am still waiting for parts. So expect more to come in the next weeks http://NOHAB inspired Roundnose by Brick Musher, auf Flickr http://NOHAB inspired Roundnose by Brick Musher, auf Flickr Please see also the complete album on flickr. Thanks for watching BrickMusher
  19. Who are some of your favorite train/locomotive AFOL builders, and what are your favorite creations of theirs? Anything and everything relating to trains amongst fan creations and builders can be discussed here, including Locomotives, Railcars, Trolleys, Monorails, Train-centric Architecture, LEGO Ideas Projects, Techniques and whatever else that may fit within the context of this subforum!
  20. Hello all, I'd like to introduce my latest MOC, the Siemens Vectron locomotive of GySEV/ROeEE railway company. These locomotive appeared only months ago on Hungarian rails, the Austrian-Hungarian railway company, GySEV/ROeEE bought 9 of these with different equipment. Some of them are dual-voltage and run under 25kV, 50Hz (Hungary) and 15kV, 16.7Hz (Austria), some of them are capable to work with DC supply as well, and 2 of them with the two different AC-supply will get diesel units inside to ensure the locos can move on industrial tracks not electrified at all. When these locomotives started to appear I designed it in LDD, there was a little competition between Hungarian LEGO train fans with the design. I was the first who finished the virtual build and I loved it, so I decided to build it as soon as possible. This was the first versions, but only AC-DC locomotives have 4 pantographs, the AC-only types have only two of them. I'm quite proud of the angular green tile in the side pattern and also the angled front needed a little thinking around. I started to love the old hing plates with two and three teeth - these teeth do NOT brake the line of the hinge plate and the whole LEGO part fit into less space and easier to build other things on the top of these bricks. The slots for lights are also capable of to be lit by LEGO LED lights - another good invention introduced first in my Stadler FLIRTs to use the flexible exoforce tubes which are capable of bringing the light of PF LEDs where I need that light. You may ask why is that M-motor hanging around - it has a great importance in this model! As the real thing with two different AC-supply, my Vectron works under two different LEGO-voltages - it is compatible with 9V track and 12V track as well! The M-motor switches a polarity switch brick, which cuts off 12V pickups from 9V train motor's contacts - when the locomotive runs in 9V mode, the pickups for 12V track could touch the same rail when going through 9V points, and the loco could short circuit herself! When the loco runs in 12V mode, the polarity switch is ON, and the 9V train motors are supplied from 12V track. At the other end of the locomotive there is an another M-motor - it cuts off the 9V train motor from the output of the controlling SBrick - it won't be a wise idea to power that SBrick both from battery box and both from the 9V track, through its output... Look at the next image, how it works: So if the locomotive reaches the end of electrified track (12V or 9V), it still can carry her train forward - it can run on internal battery box as well. And finally, yes, these stuff did fit into the model: (Since the lower light on each side serves as red and white light on the real thing and upper slot serves for long distance lights at night I put white lights on the upper, red lights on the lower slots.) Also some other images and further details can be found in Hispabrick Magazine #29: http://www.hispabrickmagazine.com/sites/default/files/Descargas/HBM029_ENG.pdf Comments and critics welcome! Some other photos:
  21. halomaster96

    (MOC) GCPD Headquarters

    Hi everyone, I haven't been too active on here, but I was hoping to get some feedback on my first major MOC. I recently finished it up in LDD, but before I started getting the parts together I want it to be perfectly planned out. I took some inspiration from 7740 as I was planning to break it down to help build this MOC and the batsignal isn't my design, but it is the one I currently have built and I like it. There are several printed/stickered parts I want to use that aren't available on LDD, obviously as they're from licensed sets. I welcome any feedback and comments. Also, would it be worth submitting this to ideas or would that be a waste of time? https://www.flickr.com/photos/legomaster96/albums/72157670346511527
  22. Presenting another Danish shunter...DSB Litra MH 322 History: The Danish State Railways (DSB) diesel shunter Litra MH were built in great numbers by Frichs in Denmark from the year 1960 to 1965. In all 120 shunters were built to replace the steam shunters still being used. The shunters were repainted in the 80's to black and red from the original dark green. The last shunter was decommissioned in 2001. ©Hans Stückler My model: Scale: 1:45 Lenght: 26 bricks Width: 7 bricks Bricks: 455 Motortype: PF Model built: 2012-14 The stickers are homemade with self-adhesive labels printed by a copy shop and then cut by myself to fit. The upper part is primarily constructed with plates and tiles, in general only a few standard bricks are used in the construction. The model is run by PF and requires one 9v battery connected by custom adapter to the Power Functions M-Motor. Pull and speed are acceptable. The shunter pulling a white Litra Gs wagon.
  23. ham_phd

    [MOC] Lego Seinfeld!

    It's a set about nothing! I built this detailed recreation of Jerry's apartment in my spare time over the past couple of weeks. If you like it, I would be extremely grateful for any support of this set on Lego Ideas! [link removed]
  24. Hi everybody! Together with my son we built our version of Vader's castle on Mustafar from R1. We tried to make it UCS style complete with a micro build, UCS style sticker and a booklet. The base (the lava field) is 96x96 studs; the total height is approx 125cm. It includes six minifigs: two imperial guards, Vaane - Vader's servant, Krennic, and two versions of Vader - one in armor, and one in the bacta tank. For the bacta tank version we used the torso from the collectible minifig gargoyle. We built it last autumn, but worked on it since; and now got around to take some decentish photos. Hope you'll like it. Here's the link to the flickr album https://www.flickr.com/photos/152265303@N06/albums/72157700068239294
  25. Hey Everyone! Here is the successor to my Lego Technic Chili Crawler, the Cactus Crawler It took about half of a year of design and revision to reach its current state, of which I am proud of. THE VIDEO: youtube Features: - 3 L-Motors for drive (two in the rear axle, one in the front) - M-Motor and a small linear actuator for front steering - Rigid, triangulated 4-link suspension for the front axle, with large, soft, black shock absorbers - Extremely rigid 2-link rear suspension with ball-joint pivot point on top of the axle, similar to that found in the RC "Mantis" crawler - 100% Lego-legal custom curved rear links that, with how the main cab is shaped, provide exceptional ground clearance towards the rear of the crawler, allowing it to climb up relatively large vertical structures such as street curbs - Very minimal, light bodywork - BuWizz for extra power and SBrick for a great, custom control scheme Note: By the time I finished designing the cab and it's battery enclosure, BuWuzz had not yet come out with the update for their iOS app that allows a single joystick/slider to control multiple outputs, so I was forced to use an SBrick with the BuWizz, providing the extra power from the BuWizz, but with the ease-of-use and great custom control profiles of the SBrick. When used with the SBrick, the BuWizz does in fact still provide more power than the standard Lego 8878 LiPo battery box. - RC4WD 1.9" Krypton scale tires - Two green pieces so that I can call it the Cactus Crawler ;) LXF hopefully coming soon, the tires can easily be found with a quick google search of their name. YES, I know, there is no body. This is meant for performance, meaning I made the cab as small, light, and rigid as possible. I will be able to reply intermittently throughout the day. I figured I'd put this up now anyway! pt