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Found 313 results

  1. BendCityAuto

    Bend City Auto Garage

    Hi, I'm new here and still trying to figure this all out! I wanted to post pictures of my project but only very low resolutions can post here. I am linking my Lego Ideas page and Flickr for better images. Flickr Photosteam Lego Ideas Project Page
  2. jimmynick

    Olafur Eliasson - Tate Modern

    The artist Olafur Eliasson is currently staging a major exhibition at the state Modern in London, which charges a fee. However, his 2004 artwork The Cubic Structural Evolution Project is free to see in the turbine hall of said museum. The artwork consists of a cityscape constructed from one tonne of white LEGO bricks, and you can tear some down and rebuild the city in your own vision. More info here: https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/olafur-eliasson/olafur-eliasson-cubic-structural-evolution-project Unfortunately, I can't go. But hopefully some EB members can check it out and maybe report on the experience!
  3. I received a lot of positive feedback on my "A New Hope" skyline, so here is the next installment: "The Empire Strikes Back." I'm currently working on creating a skyline with the same dimensions for each Star Wars film - you can see "Rogue One," and "Solo" on my Instagram and Flickr pages. I also made some slight modifications to the design to make the pieces more affordable. Anyone interested can find the instructions here.
  4. I am pleased to introduce you my latest Architecture MOC : Notre Dame de Paris Notre Dame de Paris (LEGO Architecture) by Daniel Stoeffler, on Flickr The model uses 2200 parts and the building process can be followed into .A building instruction and a file of the Bricklink inventory are available. Some more pictures : Notre Dame de Paris (LEGO Architecture) by Daniel Stoeffler, on Flickr Notre Dame de Paris (LEGO Architecture) by Daniel Stoeffler, on Flickr Notre Dame de Paris (LEGO Architecture) by Daniel Stoeffler, on Flickr Notre Dame de Paris (LEGO Architecture) by Daniel Stoeffler, on Flickr More pictures into this Flickr Album. Finally, the model is nearly at the same scale as Notre Dame de Strasbourg Notre Dame de Paris vs Notre Dame de Strasbourg (LEGO Architecture) by Daniel Stoeffler, on Flickr
  5. paupadros

    [MOC] Bilbao Skyline

    It's been a while since I posted a MOC, but I've been working behind the scenes to bring new projects. I'd been wanting to do a model of the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao for quite a long time, but had never got around to doing it. A recent trip to the city of Bilbao reignited that idea, but also made me realise the diversity of Bilbao and how well-suited it would be for an Architecture Skyline set. I therefore set off, trying to make the best buildings possible in the finest layout, but making them within a piece margin (none less than 300 pieces and none more than 600), as if I were to be a real designer. The final model has 415 pieces right in between Sydney and Chicago at an estimate price of ~ $40. I've tried to make the buildings like real designers would, but I also added some smaller low-height structures like a metro entrance (a "fosterito"), and two sculptures "Maman", by Louise Bourgeois and "Tall Tree and the Eye" by Anish Kapoor. Here are all the buildings and structures included: By clicking the image, you can find an interactive image in Flickr with links to images of the real buildings. Some information of the structures chosen Guggenheim Bilbao Museoa: A must-have. Gehry is the closest we have today to an artist-architect, so his work in general is something I adore. The Guggenheim is, without a doubt, his finest work. Building this small model was rather tough, because I couldn't pull off all the angles in Gehry's building and opted for a more simplified and less realistic version. I'm particularly proud of the tallest point in the build, the one that, in the real building, gives to the atrium a flower-shaped ceiling, as I've been able to tilt it using a sausage element! This was rendered in Blender using the magnificent Mecabricks material palette. I chose the "Silver Ink" colour, which is one that is applied on other pieces that has sort of a grainy surface. I changed slightly the material of the template to give it a warmer, yellower tone. "Maman" and "Tall Tree and the Eye" are the sculptures located on the side of the Guggenheim that faces "la ría". Both Bourgeois and Kapoor's sculptures have single pieces in Lego that represent them well, one a spider, the other the ice cream cone piece. I wanted to add "Puppy" by Jeff Koons, but I had no space for it as, in real life, it sits on the opposite side of the museum, and I found no good way of representing its flowery surface. Iberdrola Dorrea: This tower is the tallest on the whole Basque Country and is quite imposing. I must admit that I think it's too close together to the Guggenheim, but the tower itself is very pretty and contrasts it nicely. Unlike in official skylines, these two buildings and Isozaki Atea are positioned exactly like in real life. The real tower has the shape of an isosceles tringle with rounded sides, which I translated with the piece 6575 (https://brickset.com/parts/design-6575). Isozaki Atea: These towers are a product of what is called the "Guggenheim effect", architects of worldwide importance building projects around the Guggenheim. I chose these two towers as they have quite an impact on Bilbao's skyline and because the unaligned buildings on the bottom part as just very interesting. Isozaki Atea is comprised of several other buildings of less interest. Carola Garabia: After so many modern buildings, I had to somehow represent Bilbao's industrial past. Bilbao was famous for the iron manufacturing that took place, especially the boatmaking industry. This red crane is located on an old shipyard (in real Bilbao, it would be right of Iberdrola Tower). The crane adds a splash of colour to an otherwise rather dull-coloured skyline. The crane gets its name from a woman named "Carola", who always walked across the bridge in front of the shipyard. She was apparently so beautiful that the workers stopped working just to admire her. "Fosterito" (Bilbao metro entrance): Sir Norman Foster, the architect and engineer is responsible for the design of the Bilbao metro. One of the most recognisable features of his design are the glass curved metro entrances that locals have nicknamed "fosteritos", honouring him. Note: The names are in Basque, the original language of the Basque Country before Spanish became official. Note 2: I promise I’m working on a new modular, it’s been a while since I posted Disco 2000. Note 3: This was built in LDD and Mecabricks and rendered in Blender. A 3D model can be found here: https://www.mecabricks.com/en/models/KZvm9MeQvG6 Hope you like this model, but please, if you don't like something, just say it and be honest; it's the only way for me to become a better builder. Have a nice day!
  6. Hi everyone I'd like to present my latest MOC, a new modular building called Bricks & Blooms. I hope you like it. Bricks & Blooms is a modular Garden Centre built over 3 levels on a 32 x 32 base plate. in total it uses 2587 bricks. The facade is supposed to give the impression of being 2 buildings side by side but it is of course just one single building. The front to back measurement of the building is quite narrow, similar to Parisian restaurant. This is because I wanted to maintain plenty of space at the rear of the building for the main outside garden centre / plant sale area. THE MINIFIGURES I've included 6 mini figs and a cat with this MOC. Left to right they are: 2 customers (a father and his daughter), The garden centre shop keeper and gardener, the chef and the Aquatics shop assistant. THE GARDEN CENTRE AND GROUND LEVEL DETAILS The main garden centre area of the store is situated on the ground level. Outside on the street, I've included a tree, bench and lots of plants and flowers for sale. The garden centre also has a fruit and veg stall that sells it's produce directly to passers by on the street. Inside the shop I've included the cashier desk and more plants and gardening tools for sale including a little lawn mower side-build. Here is the interior of the fruit and veg stall that is accessed through a door at the back of the cashier desk. A door at the back of the shop leads out in to the main outdoor gardening area. Here I've included a large glass canopy covering rows of tables holding bedding plants. There are also more flowers, pots and other gardening products including a water feature. The stairs at the back of the building lead up to level 2. LEVEL 2 - CAFE/RESTAURANT No garden centre would be complete without its own cafe/restaurant. The cafe on level 2 has a fully equipped kitchen with serving desk and tables and chairs for the minifigs. There is also a small balcony in the cafe that looks out on to the street below. LEVEL 3 - AQUATICS Many garden centres here in the UK also have departments that specialise in pet fish and Aquatics. Bricks & Blooms is no exception and has it's own dedicated Aquatics section on level 3. The Cat below seems to have its eye on the goldfish. The door behind the desk leads out on to a small roof terrace area. FLOWER CART The model also includes a flower cart. THE FINISHED MODEL The picture below shows Bricks & Blooms combined with my other modulars and vehicle MOC's. Left to right they are. The Queen Bricktoria Convenience Store Brick Square Post Office Bricks & Blooms The Old Workhorse - Traction Engine LEGO IDEAS I have submitted Bricks & Blooms as a LEGO Ideas project. If you like the model I'd be really grateful if you'd be kind enough to head over to LEGO Ideas and give the model your votes. You can find the project at the following link. Many thanks! http://bit.ly/bricksblooms I hope you like my newest MOC and thanks very much for reading. As always, there are many more pics on my Flickr page and feel free to leave comments and let me know what you think.
  7. Retro

    Guess The City

    Hi, so your task here is to guess the city in my little MOC. I've probably done something silly, like embedded the answer in the photo titles. But anyway, it's just for fun! Some bits I invented myself, some bits I copied techniques from elsewhere. Happy to give credit or apologise where necessary.
  8. thenightman89

    [MOC] "A New Hope" Skyline

    I designed a skyline in the manner of the Architecture skyline series for "A New Hope." The design features Tatooine, the Death Star hangar / Death Star, and Yavin IV. Let me know what you think! I made instructions for this build after some clean-up and minor alterations (instructions can be accessed here). You can also follow the fun on Instagram @BenBuildsLego!
  9. The Royal Saltworks of Arc-et-Senans ( https://www.salineroyale.com/home/ ) are located in France and are included on the UNESCO world heritage list since 1982. They have been designed by french utopist architect Claude-Nicolas Ledoux ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Nicolas_Ledoux ) during the 18-th century. Ledoux aimed to build a perfect city around the saltworks activity ( http://socks-studio.com/2016/11/09/the-ideal-city-of-chaux-by-claude-nicolas-ledoux-1773-1806/ ) but only half of the circular saltworks have been built. My MOC is a microscale version of the present saltworks : Royal Saltworks of Arc-et-Senans by Daniel Stoeffler, on Flickr Royal Saltworks of Arc-et-Senans by Daniel Stoeffler, on Flickr Royal Saltworks of Arc-et-Senans by Daniel Stoeffler, on Flickr Enjoy and have also a look to my microscale version of Neuf-Brisach :
  10. This years Building Contest for the 15th Eurobricks-Event in Günzburg was: Build your own town in style of the LEGO Architecture Skyline Series. The idea behind it was to learn even more about each other. The rules were easy and as following: Use LEGO to build a skyline in style of the LEGO Architecture Skylines. Use some nice buildings or interesting sight seeing spots of the town you live in. (If it would be suuuper small and there is a bigger town near by I guess it would be fine to use that town. But e.g. don't build the skyline of Copenhagen if you would live in Billund) Keep it in roughly the same size as the models form LEGO. A nice paper print out with some informations about the skyline would be nice too. Have fun! Here are all the amazing Skylines together in one Picture and some impressions of the presentation Special thanks to CopMike for supplying us all with beautiful printed 1x8 tiles with the city names. And now here we go for all the individual entries: Ravensburg, Germany "The City of Games" (by Skalldyr) for more detailed pictures and some behind the scenes building techniques just click here!
  11. From left to right: Oldtown, King's Landing, Highgarden, Casterly Rock, Riverrun, the Eyrie, and Winterfell. I wanted to do a Lego Architecture Skyline of the seats of powers of the Seven Kingdoms of Westeros. Unfortunately, not all of them have been seen in the show. So Oldtown subbed in for Sunspear and King's Landing subbed in for Storm's End. After reviewing the entire build, I streamlined the parts usage to be more affordable and created instructions, which can be accessed here for anyone who might be interested. You can also find me on Instagram @BenBuildsLego.
  12. Hi everybody, I recently saw the statue of liberty architecture set (21042) sold at a 35% discount and simply could not resist. It is a marvelous display piece. The only thing I could not live with was that "shield face", so I took some liberty there. It ain't perfect but I actually like it quite a bit that way. I followed here a completely different approach then Jason Allemann which did another interesting "face-MOD" of that statue a while ago.
  13. This is my creation of Westeros where the epic fantasy saga “A Song of Ice and Fire” by George R. R. Martin and the HBO show “Game Of Thrones” mainly take place. The project fits in the Architecture Skyline theme. Hope you like it, any constructive comments and suggestions are welcome. More photos and instructions I recreated six of the most important locations of the show, going from south to north: Sunspear – The seat of House Martell and the capital of Dorne King's Landing – The capital of the Seven Kingdoms Pyke – The seat of House Greyjoy The Twins – The seat of House Frey Winterfell – The seat of House Stark, is considered to be the capital of the North The Wall – The massive barrier of mostly ice stretching across the northern border of the Seven Kingdoms, defending the realm from the wildlings who live beyond Total parts: 442 Measures: 44 x 8 x 10 studs 35,5 x 7 x 8 cm 14 2,8 3,2 inches p.s. hope this section of the forum is correct :)
  14. Behold the wonders of America's most unique and iconic National Park! Visitors from around the world travel to Yellowstone National Park to experience its unforgettable natural wonders. This microscale set comprised of 550 pieces includes the most celebrated locations of the park, including: The Roosevelt Arch Grand Prismatic Spring Yellowstone Lower Falls Old Faithful Geyser The Old Faithful Inn (the largest log-style structure in the world!) If you love enjoying the beauty of nature and Lego, I would be forever thankful for your support! You can also find me on Instagram @BenBuildsLego
  15. Viva Las Vegas! I haven't bought a LEGO set in quite awhile, so I went into the NYC LEGO Store while I was home just for a look around to see the new sets. I haven't really been paying attention to the news coming out, besides the beautiful Cloud City that was on display. But I digress, I was attracted to the Architecture Line wall where some sets were on display. I couldn't help but buy the new Las Vegas set even though I went into the store not intending on buying anything. I guess I just have a fondness for Vegas and all the colorful and interesting buildings that are there. I haven't been to Vegas for a couple years, but I'd always like to go back. Theme: Architecture Year: 2018 Pieces: 501 Prices: £34.99, $39.99, €39.99 Here's the front of the box. Vegas is very flashy and this set picks some pretty good landmarks of Vegas, following in the tradition of other Skyline sets. The back of the box shows what each landmark is. I've personally never heard of the Fremont Street Experience. All the others I've been to or seen. Here's the first page of the instruction book. It's a really nicely bound book like the other Architecture sets. Each page gives a really nice description of each of the landmarks included in the set. It's absolutely important to include the LLC after the Bellagio. I'll reference that again at the end in regards to something else. Every page of the book has a quote about Las Vegas from someone. I'm not sure who Jeff Maguire is, personally. Google says he's a screenwriter. Isn't this true? There's a couple other quotes as well. The booklet also includes French and Spanish translations for what was in English at the start. Thankfully this is printed piece. It's great! Perhaps it's on a clear tile to make it seem like the sign is free standing? I've never seen this piece before. I'm not sure if it's new because I've been out of the loop on new sets for awhile, but it's still an interesting piece. Not sure what else it would be used for beyond its use which you'll see later. The full piece layout. I know you're not supposed to build LEGO sets on the carpet, but doing so brought the child out in me for only a moment. There's a lot of clear and darker-clear tiles included. Now it's time to begin construction! Here's the base of Las Vegas. I bet you didn't know that Vegas was built on blue and yellow! Every once in awhile there will be a fun little blurb about something you're building. At the moment, you're supposed to be building the Freemont Casino and Street Experience. Here's the Freemont Experience completed. It's apparently a mall from what I can understand from the instruction booklet, and like everywhere in Vegas (even the airport) there's a casino in it. Now it's time to build the Luxor... The other half of the Luxor pyramid doesn't exist. I understand why - it would make the set stick out further in the back. It already sticks out because of the front of the pyramid and the back of the Bellagio. Here's the pyramid on the base. When you add more buildings to the base, it'll become less obvious that the pyramid is cut in half behind. I really like the use of the Pharaoh's headpiece for the Luxor Sphinx. Could it have been improved by a printed face on the head? I'm not sure, if they printed an ugly sphinx face it would have made it an eyesore. I think they did the right thing with a blank head. Now it's time to build the Stratosphere Observation Tower. While to me this isn't the most notable Vegas landmark, I believe it's the tallest structure in Vegas and it's the tallest freestanding observation tower in the United States. Therefore, it's understandable why it made it into the set as a part of Vegas' skyline. The way that the Stratosphere fits into the base is really clever, and it's not the last time we'll see it. The yellow pole bit goes through the propeller bit and goes into the yellow. Here's how it looks when it's placed down. You continuously improve the area around the Wynn with foliage pieces. You think you're about to start on the Wynn several times and then all of a sudden you're doing some other landmark. True to its size in real life, the Stratosphere is tall. It's clever that they use those bendy Technic looking parts for the curves of the tower. It seems that the Stratosphere has turned to the dark side as well. Luckily as we'll see later, the Bellagio is on the light side of the Force. After several false starts on the Wynn Hotel, it's now finally time to build it. Interesting that it goes at a curve. The rest of the hotel is built on a curve too. Building this was a bit of a slough. The entire thing is built of one piece bits and three piece bits so it can end up curving when you put it on the base. It's worth it though once it's placed on the base piece. The curve is a very nice touch. I don't know what this is supposed to be for the life of me. A sign for the hotel maybe? Maybe a little tree would've been better as a nod to the palm trees that line Las Vegas Boulevard? Even the page for the Wynn in the booklet where it includes its description has a palm tree in front of it. Personally when I went to Vegas I never went to the Wynn either, so if someone who frequents Vegas is reading, please leave a comment on what you think this is supposed to be. Here's the start of the penultimate landmark on the Vegas Strip - The Bellagio Hotel. If you thought that the Wynn was an ache using small pieces, you haven't seen anything yet. Once again, the designers used a clever way to put one side of the Bellagio in. Like the Stratosphere, the Bellagio's white pole goes into the one by two open piece that you see. Here's the first wing put in. As I said, now that more buildings have been added to the base, it's very tough to tell that the Luxor Pyramid is halved. The rear and center of the hotel are in, last up is another build of the wing. Make sure you note all the tiny 1x1 pieces. And that's the Bellagio done, with the Las Vegas tile in front of it. Once again, very appreciated that it's a printed tile. I've noticed that the other word tiles that I've seen in other Architecture lines are printed too. Not sure if this is the case for all of them, but it's much appreciated because for the life of me I cannot handle stickers. Thank the Gambling Gods that there's no sticker sheet! Here's the completed set all done! The final monument is the Las Vegas sign that you can see all the way at the end next to the Bellagio. Unless you're really looking up close the sign isn't that emphasized. Nevertheless, the whole set looks very nice! Those clear pieces with a bit on it that I highlighted earlier are used for the Bellagio's fountains along with some lightsaber blades. The Bellagio's fountains are beautiful. When I visited, it really stuck out to me. It's also very famously seen at the end of the film Ocean's Eleven. I might have made fun of building the set being a slough when using all those 1x1 pieces to built that you could see in the piece layout above and in the close up pictures, but this was an enjoyable build altogether especially for my first LEGO purchase in several years. So, what do I think of the set? It's just my opinion but I really like it. Some of the buildings used might not be the most iconic, at least to me. I think instead of the Wynn Hotel and Freemont Center, they could've included maybe Excalibur (the castle one), New York, New York, Caesar's Palace, the Venetian, Treasure Island or Mandalay Bay. Even the Paris hotel. Obviously all of those couldn't have been included, because Skylines sets can only be so large. I can understand the Venetian being excluded because of the Venice Skyline set and the Paris hotel because there's an Eiffel Tower Architecture set, as well as New York, New York because that's a Skylines set too. I think Excalibur with it's multiple and colorful castles, Treasure Island or Mandalay Bay with the pirate ship and volcano out front could have been good additions instead of the Wynn and Freemont. The inclusion of the Luxor and the Bellagio were smart ideas though. Perhaps though they couldn't get the rights somehow to include some of those hotels that I mentioned? Back earlier I mentioned that they call the Bellagio, "Bellagio Hotel LLC". These buildings are of course privately owned and most are not "landmarks" in the same way that other buildings in the Skylines sets are. Nevertheless, I think the set itself is pretty good. Most architecture sets are a bit overpriced, yes, but for $40 it's pretty good. I said that some of the buildings used weren't the most iconic, but all the buildings look really nice and portray a great skyline. The Bellagio's fountain is really nicely done as well, I'm glad they were able to get the shooting water effect. I think I'd buy a Bellagio only Architecture set. Even with the Stratosphere and Wynn, that are much larger, the Bellagio catches your eye. Poor Luxor looks like it's shoved in, but it's a great inclusion because that's an iconic part of the Vegas Strip as well. Altogether, I give the set an 8.5/10! I highly recommend it. It was between Vegas and the other latest Skylines set Shanghai, which does look very nice, but I think I made the right decision. This is only my second review of a LEGO set. Hopefully I did a good job and hopefully there's no review of the set waiting to be made public.If you'd like more pictures of this beautiful set, just ask!
  16. muffinbrick

    Museum

    I've tried to build something new for my digital microcity project. Inspiration was East Slovak Museum in Kosice. Scale is finaly slightly bigger, then my other buildings, but not too much. I've made it in LDD/studio.
  17. Join Harry in his journey in the Wizarding World and: • visit Hogwarts Castle and discover the underground secrets; the snowy Hogsmeade village; the shops of Ollivanders and Weasleys' Wizard Wheezes in Diagon Alley before escaping Gringott's subterranean vaults and the Dragon • meet Hagrid in his Hut and Aragog in the Forbidden Forest • play Quidditch • travel on board the Hogwarts Express with Hedwig from Platform 9¾; the Flying Anglia; The Knight Bus and Hagrid's Sidecar Total parts: 621 Measures: 44 x 12 x 16 studs 35.5 x 9.4 x 13 cm 13.9 x 3.7 x 5.1 inches more images instructions sample of the high quality and detailed 185 pages booklet
  18. thenightman89

    [MOC] Munich's Glyptothek

    I built Munich's Glyptothek (ancient sculpture museum) in Bricklink Studio. Easter eggs include the ability to easily remove the roofs of the side wings to reveal the sculptures within! You can find my other builds on Instagram: @BenBuildsLego
  19. This creation is ispired by the Star Wars universe and condensed in the LEGO format of a Skyline Architecture set. There are a lot of scenes, locations and vehicles recreated from the first two trilogies. If you can't spot them all there is a list in the following link. Instructions There are more than 790 pieces so it's jam packed :) Dimensions 792 pieces cm 37.5x 10 x 19 inch 15 x 4 x 7.5 studs 47 x 12.5 x 23.5 weight 388 gr / 13.7 oz The vehicles design have been inspired by advent calendars and other creations in microscale I found around the web. Most (if not all) of them needed to be reduced in size to fit the Skyline or adapted to be attached firmly and integrated in the little scenes that have been recreated. Hope you like it! Let me know what you think about it :) P.S. I know that maybe one for trilogy would be better or even one for movie You can find more images on my flickr page
  20. Celebrate the historic neoclassic home of one of America’s most famous Founding Fathers, Thomas Jefferson! Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello home began construction in 1768, when he was only 26 years old. America’s third president was never fully satisfied with his design, and the house was continually redesigned throughout his lifetime - not so unlike Lego fanatics constantly reworking their own builds. This microscale Monticello has been meticulously and faithfully rendered to capture the unmistakable appearance of the iconic building, known to all Americans as “that building on the back of the nickel coin.” The 930-piece set would appeal to lovers of Lego’s Architecture series, and would also contain highly sought after dark red pieces that have never before been produced. The design could also be scaled down to remove the some of the landscaping (the house by itself contains under 650 pieces). If you love architecture, history, and Lego, I would be forever thankful for your support on Lego Ideas! @BenBuildsLego | Flickr
  21. Recently completed MOC of the Belgian Club in Winnipeg Manitoba, Canada. Approximately 3500 pieces 20 hours design and build time.
  22. The Magnolias on 10th --- The newest luxury development at Wasabi District! Some facts: -Over 10,000 pieces (I stopped counting at 10k) -6 32x32 baseplates -12 modules, including roofs. 9 out of 12 modules fully detailed (interior) -3 Stores: Five Guys, Godiva, 7-Eleven -The most difficult Wasabi District project ever! Check out the rest of my Flickr account for more pics! and follow @wooootles on Instagram to find some WIP/under construction pics! Thanks for checking it out!
  23. czbotond

    [MOC] Lothal Skyline

    Hi everybody, We built this Lothal skyline from the Rebels series, in Architecture style; hope you like it: Tried to include the recognizable buildings; Ezra's tower, the Imperial Center, the Old Senate building, the marketplace, etc. The Ghost and ATDP are our designs too. (We know that the ATDP is way larger than it should be, but wanted it to be more detailed) More images here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/152265303@N06/sets/72157706049088074
  24. The first thing I remember about Berlin, apart from the confusion of Tegel, is a ruin towering over the street: the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church. The church was originally opened in 1906. It was bombed during the war, in 1943, and was something of a loose end for a decade. The architect and artist Egon Eiermann rebuilt the church from 1959 to 1963. He wanted to demolish the ruins of the bombed church, but he caved to public resistance and left the original tower standing. The tower has been preserved in its bombed state and Eiermann built a cluster of buildings around it, including a new chapel and a new bell tower. The façades of these new buildings consist of concrete lattices inset with stained glass panels. It's really something to see during the day but it is also lit up at night. In the preserved spire is a cross of nails from Coventry. The church, a beautiful and ugly trace of the war, is surrounded by consumer culture and the bustle of the city. It is flanked to the north by Budapester Straße and the Bikini Berlin mall. To the east is the Europa Center, famous for its giant spinning Mercedes-Benz logo that lights up in the night. An H&M and a Forever 21 sit to the south, just across Ku'damm and Tauentzienstraße, two of the famous shopping avenues of former West Berlin. To the west is the Waldorf Astoria hotel. To the north west, along Budapester Straße, is the Bahnhof Zoo, which was the only long-distance railway station in West Berlin. I know the church has five buildings, not three. But I decided after a month of fiddling with pieces that they would be intractable to build with any degree of accuracy at this scale, particularly the one next to the belfry. Also, having walked past the church around a hundred times, I had entirely forgotten about the small buildings so I don't think it is essential to include them. See a couple more pictures on flickr. All renders were done using the wonderful Bluerender software. Thanks for looking!
  25. paupadros

    [MOC] Disco 2000 Vinyl Store

    The concert's on, come have a listen! Disco 2000 Vinyl Store is my (I think) ninth modular and the closure of the A Summer in Tuscany - Klee Corner - Disco 2000 trilogy. I was dying to do a new corner building, mainly for three reasons: First, Lego's doing one this year, so I figured... why not? Second, because I hadn't done a pure 32x32 corner building since Sweets & Co., almost a year and a half ago! And third, because I wanted to. Without further ado.... It may not be apparent at first glance, but this modular has easily been the most time-costing and hardest modular to build. The ground floor was built up fairly quickly between May and June 2018, but creating something worthy on top is what took me all summer to figure out. So the model began on steady wheels. The brightly-coloured "boxes" on the ground floor take direct inspiration from both my own Klee Corner (the pizzeria had a similar idea) and the London Undergound. In fact, the dark red ground floor used to be an entrance to an undergound station that was closed down some years ago that has now been transformed into a state-of-the-art vinyl store. The dark red ground floor is almost a copy of those entrances that can be found in the Tube's Northern Line, covered in those beautiful blood-coloured tiles. Even in my Lego interpretation, I was able to add the beautiful sand blue lights. Outside there's a sign, "Disco 2000", it says. The old-fashined font and style of the sign is totally on purpose. Wait, there's people singing and dancing on the street... A paparazzi on the roof of the dark green glass box... Is he famous or something? Both the white windows of the tube entrance and the dark green windows are lying on their sides. In the case of the green ones, it's not quite so obvious, so it's pretty cool. There's some albums outside, which (if you can guess which they are you're a real god), but I'll talk about architecture first. The Architecture: Architecturally speaking, this model is very interesting. Just like in Klee Corner, this has three different buildings onto a single baseplate. The advantage being, of course, that I have two full façades to split them up. The final building is almost colour-coded. Every part of the build has a colour associated to it. The central and most important part of the building, kind of the "eye" of the building, is constructed using a similar method to the one I used for the façade of the lounge on Klee Corner, only this time using a 2-stud-wide pillar going up rather than a 1-stud-wide one. There were so many different iterations for the central part, even one being sort of a peacock-coloured flimsy spaghetti (maybe at building 8 out of the 15 built). I got that bug of wanting this building to do so many things at the same time that I had to chop down things that I'd done which no longer fitted the image I chased. The final result is way simpler than some previous ones and has a lovely Belle Epoque feel to it. This final iteration is inspired by the gorgeous entrances of the Paris Metro (metro entrance over underground entrance, that's kind of hilarious ). I retook one iteration of Klee Corner for the shape of the roof, so it has a perfect triangular balance with the two side pieces. The Iron Horse+Klee Corner+Paris Metro, I think the result's pretty cool! I had already done the first render when I realised the façade needed some more dynamism. Initially, the windows were totally aligned. I then changed that static feel by breaking the lines and making them follow the curvature of the escaling roof. I love the double curve that the escalating windows and the curvature of the building itself have. creator saying stupid stuff. The brown building on the right scared me a little bit, as I'd never been able to pull off a good dark building, brown, for instance. Dark Orange, when rendered in Pov-Ray, though has this chocolate colour which is just delightful. In fact, this side building was not part of the plan first, as a whole building covered the whole "London undergound" ground floor. Then, for quite a while I had a cool texture for a brick wall that was just six studs wide which helped me figure out the measurements for the central building. That idea stuck, but in the end, due to the central building being shrinked, this brown building grew. I gave it some windows inspired by those of a school that I walk past every day and the greatest of rooflines. You really have to look at this: there's pieces looking in four different directions. The right way up, upside down and to both sides! The white/blue/yellow building on the left has a bit less of a tumultuous story to it. It began as a version of the Met Breuer, as the central building was to be something along the lines of a Gehry work. Once I'd settled for a much more colourful design on the other two buildings (after a looooong while), that grey thing looked as terrible as a stain on a red dress. Therefore, I reused on of the ideas for the central building for this side one, adapted some earlier window designs, changed the colours, added the sign, and voilà! There it is! The Interiors: Cross the gates to the awesomeness of the world of music. Because this was done in LDD, I couldn't build those racks full of vinyls, so instead I covered an entire wall of the best-selling vinyls. Note: All the covers are Lego interpretations of real albums! In fact, there's the entire discographies of two bands! Have a guess! The pattern on the floor, funnily enough comes from a "Where's Wally?" book which had a similar one. There's turntables and hanging vinyls on the window shop. On the opposite side, there's a nice Dalí-inspired coach with... again the same special guest!? Now, that can't be a coincidence, can it? The floor above has a magnificent concert stage for artists to play. I really like the atmosphere I captured in this area. I can easily imagine a songwriter playing his/her songs on that stage, as the city lights shine bright behind the sand green building. There's a small bar for guests to take a drink as the concert's on. The room's, though, not big enough for all the audience, so some of those left outside have to climb outside the window and listen from there. Be careful! The interior is built in a Brick Bank kind of way, all the different buildings share one same interior. Finally, the top floor is... A music shop! Couldn't be anything else, could it? 1 Assembly Square can start to tremble as there's a new neighbour next doors with much better instruments and at a better price. The widest range of guitars in all the imaginable colours and shapes, keyboards, amps, synths, drums and pianos. They say the owner of the Magic Shop built this drum kit and his grandchildren have put it on sale. They also say that both pianos, those of Magic Shop and Klee Corner were bought here and that's why they don't have one on stock right now. This drum kit, they say, is so loud that it was able to distort time and make the owner of Magic Shop live over 170 years. Maybe it was his potions what kept him alive. Again, who's that guy? He's everywhere! One Last Image: Disco 2000 Vinyl Store, surrounded by its two new friends, A Summer in Tuscany and Klee Corner. I think that Disco 2000 may even look better surrounded by other models than alone, unlike the other two, which definitely look better alone. Hope you like this modular! Pau