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Found 154 results

  1. This rotary plow-fronted train is ready to keep the other trains running in the worst winter weather using good old-fashioned steam power! 100% fictional history of the steam engine type (and the whole train, really): In late-1929, Thomas Carter was Chief Mechanical Engineer for Brick Railway Systems (BRS), and on vacation to visit family in New Zealand. He was about to get on the train in Christchurch, when he was passed by a new NZR "G" class 4-6-2+2-6-4 Garratt steam engine. Remembering how he was having problems getting the next "big thing" built back in America, and that he was having a steam power crunch when it came to rotary snow plow duty up in the Rocky Mountains, he contacted the engine's manufacturer, Beyer, Peacock and Company, and talked about a possible contract in America using the New Zealand "G"class as a starting point. Once he got home to BRS company HQ in St. Louis, Missouri, he got the upper management's final okay, and began final design on the new "DC" class of Garratts. (DC standing for Double Consolidation, as it is really just two Consolidation 2-8-0 type loco wheel-set's back-to-back with one boiler.) All in all, six of these (assigned numbers 4834 - 4840 by the railroad) were made as a trial run in 1930, but the Great Depression worsened in 1931-33 so no more were ever ordered. (originally, 10 locos more were planned for general freight service but were never built, which would have brought the grand total up to 16 engines.) Six engines were permanently paired off of with a dual snow plow team: two DC engines on each plow, with each engine team working the two track main line, one team per track, one way, until they met at the halfway point of Continental Divide (also known as the town of Summit Point), which was a vital steam-era crew exchange and refueling point near a inter-state highway. The third team of two engines and it's plow (The one marked YO seen above) was used as replacement engine for the two crews already mentioned, and were only used if another rotary crew was down for regular maintenance or due to an accident. After diesels came on the scene to replace the steamers (plows and engines alike) in the mid-to-late 1950's, the only two steam engines left of the DC type in North America were pushing the spare steam rotary plow YO. One of these locomotives (no. 4840) was found to have a severely rusted water tank and front engine frame, and was thus kept for spare parts to keep the other loco (no. 4839) running. This severely impacted the surviving engine's ability to push the rotary plow hard enough to make it through the dense banks of Colorado snow. After a few unsuccessful modification attempts to keep the 34-year old engine going, it was decided to send the entire train (plow, engine, and caboose used for the train) to a railroad museum in Missouri. They would also be sent with all the remaining parts from engine 4840 as it might be prudent to re-steam the engine in the future. So, in 1963, the YO and 4839 were sent to National Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, where it still sits today. (The following part of the story is actually true!) This steam powered rotary snowplow was inspired by the real-world Denver and Rio Grande's narrow gauge plow "OY", as now seen on the Cumbres and Toltec RR in New Mexico / Colorado. I've decided to name my plow "YO" in tribute to my inspiration, using a 2010 Toy Story printed part for the "YO" designation. Oh, and yes, the front "blade" does spin around, but is not motorized. This model has been updated since the last time I uploaded this, with a better plow shroud because the old one would fall off when I looked at it funny. This one is not upside down on the bottom half like the old one, but it is MUCH more sturdy. (I was inspired by @dr_spock's rotary snowplow to build my own plow. Take a look at his Flickr as he's got a bunch of cool designs there!) The rear of the plow features the coal tender with a ladder from the water tank-top down to the magnetic coupler. (Before anyone says anything about Garratt loco's not being ever sold into the North American market, I'll say this is not from our reality, this is my own railroad mirror-world and does not follow our history as closely as it could. I mean, I've got steam loco's running into the 1970's on main lines hauling premier passenger trains for goodness sake!) This engine was originally inspired by two SRW locomotive works products. (Both were Garratt models made by @SavaTheAggie and formerly available on Bricklink until LEGO sadly removed his instructions) I reworked the model from Sava's 4-6-2+2-6-4 to a 2-8-0+0-8-2. I also added the forward water tank and aft coal bunker from his 2-4-0+0-4-2 Garratt, a custom boiler designed by me and medium Big Ben Bricks drivers to make it from a fast passenger loco into a slow freight hauler. (or in this case, a snow plow pusher!) The engine is flexible to a degree more than this, but not by much. It goes though R40 curves and switches just fine, though. A simple caboose, for the protecting the rear of the snow plow train. I used a pair interesting windscreen parts for the cupola windows. Inspired partially by 2001 My Own Train set 10014, (Caboose) but in blue. NOTES: Finally finished 10/7/2020!
  2. It is the early 1930's. The dark days of late 1929 has worsened into a economic depression of truly epic proportions. Worse, the drought starting in summer 1930 (lasting until above average rains stopped it in 1941) caused the dreaded Dust Bowl and the mass migration of (most) of an entire generation of farmers and their families westward. This time frame also led to the rise of hobos, wandering, jobless people trying to use the one mass transportation still running across the dusty, windswept nation: The freight trains. The backstory on this train is as such: The engine, number 6519, runs daily from Lawrence, Kansas yard to where it finally services the Rust-eze factory in Moberly, Missouri. The line branches off and curves to the left in Columbia Missouri, while the main goes straight on to St. Louis. The rest of the regular freight is worked at the Columbia yard, expect for the acid tanker and the two marked generic boxcars. That tanker goes to the factory too, as it's a chemical component for Rust-eze. Rumor has it that the Rust-eze plant will be moving closer to St. Louis, or even shutting down soon, maybe by early 1934. The engine used to be a heavy-hauler out on the main, but has been relegated to branch line work, as it's 1898-vintage pistons are wearing a bit thin and she is overdue for a overhaul. Unfortunately, with the current depression, she has been reassigned to light branch work with a limit on her speed. Hopefully, they will scrape up the money to get her in the shop soon. This early 1900's-era engine model was first designed as a 2-8-2 Mikado before having the front pony truck removed and a 4 wheel bogie from set 10194 (Emerald Night) added instead, turning it into a 4-8-0 Mastodon - type. The rear pony truck was removed as well, with the 79111-style boiler shortened and cab re-arranged. Then, as of late September of this year, I completely rebuilt her from the wheels up to use the Disney engine boiler you see here. The running gear was originally a Scotnick invention from his 9F, but now comes from my MOD of the Constitution Train Chase set. So, basically, the only thing original left is the tender. Together, these several different engines from four different eras and five separate builders come together to create this one steam engine, which I have numbered 6519. The coal tender was inspired by Anthony Sava's Pacific 4-6-2 model's oil tender with the letters "BRS" added in the middle of the tender using printed 1 x 1 tiles. I was inspired by this photo by JB Lego to build this boxcar as seen here. They are made to haul pallets of cargo, specifically Rust-eze chrome restorer in 55-gallon drum containers for commercial packaging at this facility into smaller containers. Inspired by the green tractor trailer from CITY set 4204 (The Mine), this bathtub gondola is carrying boulders from the mine destined for the gold refinery where they will be opened up and the metal extracted to make coins and ingots. This drop side flat car was first part of set 2126 (Train Cars), but it didn't really have a purpose. It was hauling uprooted evergreen trees in the set, but that didn't look very good, so I changed it to generic freight. (My layout's resident hobo and his trusty guitar usually catch a ride on this piece of rolling stock.) The hobo is trying to get home to his family, which lives in Glenncoe, Missouri. Sadly, he picked the wrong train, as this only get's him halfway there. He's going to have to ride the blind of a steam engine tender on a passenger run to get home. (that's the area between the first car and tender, it's very dangerous because you're balancing on the coupler!) This dangerous liquid tanker was modeled after a real tanker car you can walk through in the Museum of Transportation's collection in St. Louis, Missouri. The real deal hauled hydrochloric acid for Monsanto starting in 1940 up into the late 1960's. I'm backdating the car ten years to fit into my mid-'30's freight train. I have adapted this UK inspired model of a brake van by Fireglo450 (see it here) to once again be a more American-inspired caboose. The caboose has no interior, and the red marker light can go on either end of the model to represent the end of whatever train it is being hauled behind. Here you can find other topics of interest mentioned in the text, or that are similar enough to be placed alongside time frame-wise I have this passenger train, that goes along with the freight train in this time period. (No, the hobo does not ride this one home.) and this branch-line station that is from the same late-1890's era, and on the main line from the San Francisco to New York (via St. Louis, of course!) Here we see the (100% fictional) Moberly, Missouri, Ruste-eze Factory. It seems to have made it to better times, with this picture taking place in the early 1950's. Any thoughts, comments, or complaints?
  3. Jeffinslaw

    [MOC] C&O K4 2-8-4 #2716

    Hey guys! I have a new MOC to share. This was a commissioned build that will be turned into a full kit for bricktraindepot.com. Will be doing additional full kits for Nickel Plate #765 and Pere Marquette #1225 as well. Pre-orders for all three kits will open on September 1st! If you purchase the C&O kit, $100 will be donated to Kentucky Steam to help with the restoration of #2716. Anyways, about the engine. The Chesapeake and Ohio Railway's K-4 class were a group of ninety 2-8-4 steam locomotives purchased during and shortly after World War II. Unlike many other railroads in the United States, the C&O chose to nickname this class "Kanawha", after the river in West Virginia, rather than "Berkshire", after the region in New England. During the 1940s, the C&O K-4's were being built to haul heavy freight services and were used mostly for high speed freight and passenger services throughout the north-eastern regions of the United States and part of Ontario, Canada by the Pere Marquette Railway. C&O Class K-4s were one of the few recognizable 2-8-4 (Berkshires) classes in North America along with the Pere Marquette Class N (road numbers 1201-1239), and Nickel Plate Road Class S (road numbers 715-779). Both the PM Class N and NKP Class S were manufactured by the Lima Locomotive Works in Lima, Ohio. NKP 779 was the last standard-gauge Berkshire to be built in the world, and the last steam locomotive built by Lima Locomotive Works. My model features 2x L motors in the boiler with custom battery box in the tender and all specialty wire custom finished, 3D printed XL drivers, BrickTracks wheel in roller bearings, custom side rods by TrainedBricks, and decals by OkBrickWorks. I've finished the physical build and have been doing testing while waiting for OKBrickWorks to print my decals and wheels. Hope you enjoy the renders for now. More pictures will be coming soon! Left Front by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Right Front by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Getting close! by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Additionally, be on the lookout for other train cars from BTD such as the AAR 50 ton hopper in C&O livery as well as an update to our TOFC to include a C&O flat car and some Railway Express Agency trailers. Let me know that you guys think! -Jeffinslaw
  4. This train was originally supposed to go with the new Crocodile electric locomotive (set 10277) that was revealed a couple months ago. But it doesn't fit my UK "theme" very well, so I bought this train instead. This engine is numbered 514 (as a tribute to the HC514 part seen in the Adventurers sets), and the the tender should say LNER, (London North-Eastern Railway) as that's who originally designed and built the Z1 class locomotive. This 4-6-2 type engine is named Hazel Crusader, and is not actually owned by the railroad company, but it is maintained and crewed by the railroad's employees when called upon by Lord Sinister to be moved from his private siding. (That's why it has the non-LNER-standard gold, black, and brown paint scheme that matches his coaches: it's Sam's personal color scheme for his railway stock - it's owned by Lord Sam Sinister himself. He even had this locomotive designed just for him.) In reality, this Z1 type never existed on the LNER, as it is a creation of my own imagination. My fictional Z1 take on the wheel 4-6-2 arrangement is inspired by the 2-10-0 Austerity class of WWII (boiler wise) with a tender donated by the A3 which originally pulled Sam Sinister's train. This is Sam Sinister's automobile, situated quite precariously on a two-wheel flat car that is much too small. Being that Sam is cheap, he bought the one that would cover his needs... sight unseen. The railway yard master's eyes nearly fell out of his head when he finally saw what Sam was going to load onto this flat car! The flat car is easily detachable from the load, as you can see here. (NOTE: This car was inspired by the 2015 SDCC exclusive Action Comics number 1 Superman, recolored and heavily modified.) The car seats two figures side-by-side, and even comes with a spare tire in the back. This Gatling gun car protects the train from any goody-goody interlopers trying to make off with Sam Sinister's ill-gotten goods... namely Johnny Thunder and his friends. NOTE: The Gatling gun on this car was taken wholesale from set 79111. (Constitution Train Chase) These looted ancient Egyptian items include: a temple guardian from the Well of Souls (taken from set 7621, Secret of the Lost Tomb), a obelisk warning others to not defile it's owner's tomb, and the Queen's sarcophagus itself, with a very angry mummy inside. (Guess Sam doesn't listen very well, huh?) I wasn't kidding about that curse you know! Look's like Sam's somehow stolen a Sphinx as well! (not THE Sphinx, of course, that would never fit on his train car and would be a bit missed by the locals... not to mention any snooping Archaeologists!) Thankfully, however, Sphinx were not inscribed with any magic hieroglyphics, so they are safe to observe.... or in Sam Sinister's case, "borrow without permission". Unlike the Re-Gou Ruby's twin (yet not worth anything) gem which can curse you to an eternity of bad puns, as the now-mad Baron Von Barron found out. In reality, the statue's head was inspired the one in set 5978. (Sphinx secret surprise) In this train car we find all the weapons one could dream of in the 1920's, as it is called the armory car after all. (Thanks again to @Pdaitabird for making these cars in his awesome instructions, which you can find on Flickr here.) This is Sinister's war wagon. Why is it called that? It has old charts, brand-new maps, magazines and trade journals, plus all kinds of notes with clues to hidden locations with items of vast power or great fortune just waiting to be grabbed. If Johnny Thunder or Sam Sinister hasn't seen it or at least heard of it, the item probably doesn't exist. This car also houses Lord Sinister's bedroom for overnight journeys. Here we see the whole train at an "on-it's-side" view for maximum viewing. Thoughts, compliments, complaints, and suggestions are all welcome! NOTE9/22/2020: Added updated real world pictures of everything, including the Sphinx car and updated steam loco, now called Hazel Crusader 514. (as in HC-514, the print on the tile on the side of the cab. Took me quite a while to figure out a good name for the engine!)
  5. The War Department "Austerity" 2-10-0 is a type of steam heavy freight locomotive that was introduced in WWII in 1943. It was designed by R.A. Riddles, the same man who latter went on to design the British Railways 9F 2-10-0 type. I've backdated my 1950's 9F type into this 1940's Austerity class by removing the side smoke deflectors and changing around some small features here and there. As most of this engine still existed as-built from my previous 9F build from 2014 (that itself was inspired by @ScotNick's model of Thomas and Friends' 9F-type engine Murdoch) or so, I just needed to get wheels, a tender draw-bar connector, pistons / side-rods, and the little bit of parts to convert it to a Austerity type. The tender has "BR" printed on it in 1 x 1 tiles, standing for British Railways, as this engine was placed into service with the newly nationalized rail network after service with the War Department during WWII (around early 1948). However, it still is carrying it's War-time grayscale color scheme at this point in the early 1950's, lending to it's nickname the "Gray Ghost". The cab of the engine, with firebox in the middle. In the real world, the Austerity 2-10-0 class engine was designed and built during the Second World War as an British export locomotive, with some going as far away as Greece, the Netherlands, or Syria, while a few stayed in the UK to be worked by the War Department, and later, British Railways. All but three of the ones from the UK (of which one was owned by the Longmoor Military Railway) survived mass scrapping in 1962 and were preserved, while a fourth was brought back from the Netherlands and also survives. (There are also a few derelict versions in Greece, while a museum in the Netherlands has an engine as well, albeit in much better condition than the Greek locos.) All credit for the BR plank wagon model seen in the picture above goes to @Pdaitabird, who designed them. See here for an awesome step-by-step tutorial by the original builder of the BR plank wagon. Original design by Flickr user Fireglo450 in 2013, revised by me in 2020. See here for the original inspirational model. Here we see the whole gravel train at an "on-it's-side" view for maximum viewing. This train is destined for the Gravel loading facility where it will be loaded with crushed stone for either rail ballast or concrete works projects elsewhere in the country. As usual, comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome!
  6. Craig Strader

    Canadian Pacific G2

    At long last I present to you all my second steam engine: The Canadian Pacific G2 Pacific I was pleased with how this one turned out especially the smokebox on the locomotive. It took longer than I wanted and that is because I had other things around me to consider. But I would see to it that it would get through for you guys. Runs of 2 L motors housed in the boiler with the IR receiver and battery box in the tender. I know it is rather bulky for a small steam engine. But I wanted to make sure that I could get in as much details as possible.
  7. Dear community, Today I would like to advertise a campaign and present a MOC to you, which basically does not belong to my core competence, but which I nevertheless enjoyed developing very much. But now lets start at the beginning... In the middle of June one of my customers from Dresden wrote me a kind e-mail. He informed me that the Saxon paddle steamer fleet, which is the oldest and largest paddle steamer fleet in the world, is currently in economic troubles. Not only because of Covid-19, but also because of the increased low water in the past years. Locals, fans and friends want to support the association "Weiße Flotte Dresden (white fleet dresden)" with various activities. The idea of my customer was to create a construction instruction for a steamship model and to sell it. A major part of the proceeds were to go to the campaign. I wanted to help. I wouldn't call myself a real fan of steam ships, but after some research I was fascinated by these old heavy machinery, like the steamers on the rails. The problem, clearly, I had never built such a model before, but once my interest was caught and after choosing a suitable original, I started working on it. It gave me great pleasure to see the model grow, also the acquisition of new building techniques from the sector ships was exciting. But soon it became clear that a scale model would be about 1.5m long. This is of course way too big to make a instruction for private customers. So I designed a model in reduced size. I paid special attention to the recognition value by the colouring and the proportions. Various details were reproduced in the exterior and on the decks, but also in the interior. For example the steam engine, which can be driven together with the two paddle wheels by a Power-Functions or Powered Up motor. The model is built in minifig size. The individual decks can be removed individually and the interior can be played on. The instructions are available directly on our homepage or in our Ebay-Shop for 14,99€ / $17.99. From each sold steamship instruction, we pass on 11€ / $13. We support the crowdfunding initiative "Preservation of the Dresden Steamship Fleet", which was founded by Michael Hillmann. Further information about the initiative can be found here. Many thanks and best wishes Martin | www.bricks-on-rails.de Inspired by the steamship "Dresden" The lifeboat is also present The roofs can be removed, the bridge offers space for the captain There are several seats at the rear, the lower deck is not equipped. The view of the "steam engine" In the front saloon there is, besides some seating, also a small galley The ship is divided into individual modules The dimensions of the finished model
  8. Craig Strader

    Northern Pacific Z-6 Challenger

    A 4-6-6-4 type steam locomotive. First conceived by the Northern Pacific in the 1930s, they were among the steam locomotives that represented "super-power" where engine builders learned to create locomotives that combined both power and speed. The first batch of 12 of these engines were first delivered in 1936 to replace double-heading methods. The locomotives please Northern Pacific so much in fact that 9 more were ordered in 1937. They could be found all over the NP's divisions hauling fast freight trains and reefer trains. Their 69 inch drivers allowed them not only strong pulling power but also the ability to go 60 miles per hour. I thought it could bring a real "challenge" to those who want to build it. It has OVER 2000 parts total. It has a side rod system that needed to be reversed engineered a few times to perfect it to where no 3rd party elements are required. Unlike most other articulated steam engines I have seen on YouTube and other places, mine has a FIXED rear engine unit and a front free swinging engine unit just like Union Pacific 4014 that was restored in 2019 if I am correct. Description: Locomotive is powered by 4 LARGE motors, these sit inside the boiler and provide the means of going forwards and backwards. Both the IR receiver and battery box sit inside the tender. I would recommend some extension cables given the fact that the locomotive itself is very long. The IR receiver also plays a part in the tender for the locomotive is designed to look like an oil burner. The bogies on the tender are specially designed to not only to look realistic but also to take turns at the same time. And the same can be said on the lead truck in front of the first engine unit. The cab will actually let you house an engineer and fireman to simulated them driving the locomotive. To look at my other creations go to BrickLink and search under Strader987 https://www.bricklink.com/v3/studio/design.page?idModel=160723 This locomotive is also on The Lego Ideas website, here is where to find it: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/7a2adb34-7fc5-401a-aa28-c8eddd37480c Please help me get 10,000 supporters please.
  9. Like many people, I regarded steam locomotives as rather dark and monstrouos machines untill I first saw their early iterations. It was a novel technology at the time, so embelishing them for the amazed crowds and potential contractors should have been appropiate. The mechanical detail is more aesthetic than plausible. Yet, there are elements taken from what an early steam walker should have looked like, besides the vibrant colours. Most of its inhards are shown, there are very few largue pieces of metal, structural elements take over shape design. It is somewhat outlandish, taking a mechanical shape similar to that of many tin toys. Even if it seems to be something rather decorative, there are a few tricks to make it more resistant than it seems. Legs rest directly over the axle pillar and the superstructure it hides. Feet are also anchored to the base to avoid deformation.
  10. I tried to recreate the Flying Scotsman to the best of my ability. I have also tried to created good looking instructions to go along with my creation. She can become remote controlled with Power Functions/ Powered up really easily with a few modular modifications. I have also uploaded her to LEGO IDEAS. Flying Scotsman LEGO by Da Mangos, on Flickr Flying Scotsman LEGO by Da Mangos, on Flickr Flying Scotsman LEGO by Da Mangos, on Flickr Flying Scotsman LEGO by Da Mangos, on Flickr Here she is without smoke defectors and a double tender. Flying Scotsman LEGO by Da Mangos, on Flickr These Instructions are NOT to be sold, they are free for everyone. Instructions download: https://1drv.ms/b/s!AspcbvQ53YKPnzVyiFCVFkgh43-Z Hope you Enjoy.
  11. First off: I did not design this steam engine! I modified it heavily to suit my tastes from this Eurobricks post (link here) from user @damangos. I did, however, rework my original 7 wide Emerald Night tender from 2014 instead of the 6 wide tender used by damangos in the original model, and I also reworked his model to suit my tastes and be cheaper on BrickLink. The engine in question is modeled in LNER dark green, and is numbered one higher than the A3 engine series ever went, though it is still called the the Emerald Knight. (just the set 10194's name with an added K, as you may have noticed.).... and yes, it's a bit dusty. I just noticed, and it's too late to retake the pictures now. (It's been sitting in a open-top bin waiting for the coaches to be built for a while, and I thought I dusted it thoroughly.) LNER is the name of the railroad that built the locomotive (like it's real-world inspiration, the Flying Scotsman, 4472), and it stands for London North Eastern Railway. The number 2509 was chosen because the A3 class of engines never went that high in numbering. (2508 was the highest, and was the last one built in the mid-1930's.) These four regular coaches, (and one guard's coach, seen below) are inspired by the recent Hogwarts Express cars, to save money on wheels and train car bodies / frames. They don't have any of the interior details the Hogwarts Express has, though. I based the colors of the coaches on a inverted set 10194 (Emerald Night) coach color scheme. I always thought the colors looked better like this, and it avoids the problems of the tan 1 x 4 x 3 train windows used in the original set. (which are very expensive!!) Fictional locomotive backstory: Fictional locomotive backstory: This is loco 2509, built January 1936 as the very last A3 to roll out of the factory for London North Eastern Railways (LNER). It was given the name Emerald Knight, a name which, while being the name of a wining racehorse from the mid-1800's also matched it's dark green paint job. The engine was usually assigned the the Kings Cross to Scarborough line, hauling the Scarborough Flyer until being withdrawn in 1965. The engine survived WWII in remarkable shape of maintenance during those hard years due to the heroic actions of it's engine and shed crews who were said to have taken a shine to "well-riding" and "good tempered" engine. Steaming never was an issue, and the fire was always roaring right when you wanted it according to a fair amount of it's crews from 1940 to 1947. British Railways (BR) took over in 1948 and the engine was painted "Express dark blue". Loco 2509 soldiered on for 17 more years until 1965 when it was deemed unnecessary for future use and sold for scrapping. Thankfully, unlike 99% of the rest of it's class (except for the Flying Scotsman, which was also saved), it was not condemned to the scrap line for very long, as it was saved in 1966 by the Lego Rail Transportation Society (LRTS), a preservation group with aims to restore the trusty engine to it's former glory. LRTS backdated the loco to it's original 1936 exterior specifications, while keeping abreast of any interior improvements made to it's sister loco "the Flying Scotsman" (loco number 4472) over the next forty years. In early 2018, the engine was rolled into the shop for it's new boiler ticket tear-down, when it was announced it would wear LNER dark green again instead of the BR dark blue. The engine rolled out of the LRTS shops on December 26th, 2019, just in time for the engine's 84th birthday celebration in January 2020. Well, that's all I got for now... just need to get my layout up and running again! Comments, questions, and complaints are welcome as usual!
  12. This train is named the 909 National Limited, a (fictional) early 1930's steam-powered train run by Brick Railway Systems. This transcontinental train has it's respective east or west bound sections leave New York (or Los Angeles) on Monday at 9-AM sharp for the 3-day "Day" trip to the final destination, 72 hours distant, at 9:00 AM on Thursday. Then, after that train is cleaned and restocked in less than 12 hours, than it, or the standby train if their is delays, can be sent back as the "Night" section on-wards at 9-PM Thursday to 9-PM Sunday night. At 9-AM Monday morning, the whole cycle repeats anew for the next week. Their are five complete train-sets, two being used at any one time, two being cleaned and restocked on a bi-weekly basis, and one for standby in case of breakdowns. Also, coaches are in ready to use condition in several yards in large cities, just waiting to be dropped into place if a car needs to be worked on en-route. There are seven of the streamlined 4-8-2 "Mountain" type engines (numbers 4307 to 4314) assigned to the 909 National Limited, with a rotating pool of rolling repair and preventative maintenance schedules vigorously followed. Here we see engine 4312, it was built in the late 1920's by Lima locomotive Works. It was one of the lucky few of the 50 engines bought by Brick Railway Systems to receive a complete streamlined casing shortly after being assigned to 909 National Limited in 1931, along with six other's of it's type. It is painted in reddish brown with a fluted black side stripe on the engine and black box stripe on the tender to keep it in line with the passenger cars of the 909 National Limited, it's assignment for the foreseeable future. In reality, this locomotive was inspired by the South Australian Railways 520 class 4-8-4 and the hover mono-rail engine from the Legend of Korra TV Show, while the train coaches were inspired by a vintage 2009 LEGO model of "Galaxy Express 999". (Link to Brickshelf here ) The real story behind the of the name 909 Limited is a combination of this fantasy train and the Beatles song "One after 909", which is sort-of about a train. This is where the food is cooked and baggage is stored on the transcontinental journey. I don't know if such a car type really exists, but if not, I'm not sure what to call it... any suggestions? One of these cars is a sleeper, one a dining car, and one is a coach. But YOU get to guess which one is which! (Answer: They are exactly the same externally and there is no inside details. Only my imagination provides the difference!) The observation car at the end of the train has a viewing platform for looking at all the wonders this country has to offer as they go by. Builders Notes: So I looked back through the forum archive, and didn't see a topic posted for this train by itself. I saw one with other trains with it, but not one by itself, and it wasn't even in real bricks... so here is my updated for 2019 pictures and detailed description for this revised model. Also, the three day journey each way is plausible, as I asked Google, and it spit out a map from 1930 that said it took a train three days (72 hours) to get from Los Angeles to New York City. Now, I know that most trains headed to LA started in Chicago, but I'm ignoring that fact in my alternate reality LEGO-world here steam never died off completely, Amtrak doesn't exist in the semi-corporate mess it does today, and the electrification of the Milwaukee Road reached from the Twin Cities region to the Pacific ocean and are still there today. On that note, the North East Corridor wires stretch all the way to Chicago. ...anyway, kinda got off topic there. As usual, if you have any questions, comments, or complaints, please post them below!
  13. Here are all the pictures of my (and a few other members of Gateway Lego User Group) Wild West era-stuff on display at Our Lady of the Snows' Way of Lights display, in Belleville, Illinois until December 31st. (excluding Christmas and New-Years eve, they are closed those nights.) These only are some of models I have been making since 2014, more can be found in this thread here. There are a ton more tables (and themes!) at the show, so come on down to view them all, this is only a small inkling of what's there! (sorry mod's, had to do that last bit.) US army Fort Legoredo, circa mid-1885. The town of Legoredo, part 1: general store (in front, next to fort) Doc Brown's saloon, (corner lot) train station (obviously placed) The town of Legoredo, part 2. post office (in white with red flags) Sheriff Woody's lockup (next to the water tower) barber shop (with the deck on the second floor) Bank (the big impressive building) blacksmith's shop (small shack across from the bank) rear-wheel steamboat Proud Mary and the Boulder Cliff Canyon through-truss bridge. Also, Stinky Pete's house nearby. Rapid River Village, part 1. The posse is chasing down the escaping convicts on the handcar, while the train is making up for lost time and might beat both of them! (I was inspired by the 1990's LEGO Loco video game opening cinematic with the handcar being chased by the train, if you couldn't tell.) Rapid River Village - part 2, with skull butte and the village elder's tepee's on top. Also, see if you can spot the tail end of the Delorean time machine in the tunnel! NOTE: This is not all my stuff - the Indian village on the tan base-plates was designed by Gateway LUG member Chris Curtis, and the red stagecoach was brought in by a third member. My father designed the three elevated wooden box-risers next to the skull mountain, under the cubed tan felt. Any thoughts, comments, or suggestions? Please leave them below!
  14. Good evening, everyone, Today I would like to present you our model of the German "war locomotive DR BR 52" of the "Deutsche Reichsbahn". This is a tender locomotive, of which more than 7000 units have been built since 1942. It is often called a war locomotive, because it was designed and built especially for war conditions and the resulting shortage of raw materials. Even after the war, these locomotives were still in use for a long time, distributed throughout Europe. The retirement of the Deutsche Bahn took place in 1962. The model can be powered by two Power-Functions L-motors. Both engines and the infrared receiver are installed in the boiler. The battery box finds place in the tub tender. The locomotive consists of approx. 1218 components and is approx. 64 studs long. The model has some details, such as the undercarriage, the superstructure on the boiler or the striking tub tender. Various SNOT techniques were used during construction. Have fun watching and many greetings Comments and criticism welcome These and other pictures can be found in our Flickr folder and on our homepage.
  15. Good evening everyone, Today I would like to present another "international" model. This is the "NSB Type 49 - Dovregubben" of the Norwegian State Railway. It was built between 1935 and 1941 and was mainly used on the "Dovre-Railway", that´s the reason why the locomotive is also called "Dovregubben". The model consists of approx. 1020 individual parts, is 58 studs long and approx. 10 studs wide. It can be driven by two M-engines, one above the other in the boiler. The IR receiver is located in the cab and the battery box in the Vanderbilt tender. This model was developed from a former customer request and was a special challenge, since there are unfortunately only very few meaningful photographs or pictures in the Internet to find. Usually only black and white. Therefore we mainly used photos of a H0 model. Praise and criticism are very welcome. Kind regards Martin Further pictures in the flickr-folder or on our homepage
  16. Hi all, I recently went on a bit of a designing spree during my holidays and thought I'd share the results. I've been developing these models at a slightly smaller scale than usual (Hence 6-wide), but it's been a fun challenge and one I would like to develop into more actual models if I have the time. I thought i'd share them all at once as I didn't want to clog the forum xD MALLARD (LNER A4 Class) The first design I did of this scale and the only model I have physically made. You'll notice that the boiler is different from the render as those arch blue pieces are horrendously expensive. If you are interested I go into more detail about it in this MOC video on my Youtube channel. FLYING SCOTSMAN (LNER A3 Class) Classic design to follow on from. The wheelbase is copied from my Mallard build, which forms the base for all my pacific class designs. TORNADO (BR Peppercorn A1 Class) Developed this by tweaking the Flying Scotsman build. I know of better ways to do the smoke deflectors, but unfortunately the parts weren't available on LDraw. GWR HALL CLASS I developed this for a friend's Hogwarts Express build, but also as a bit of fun. With a couple of tweaks this could always pass for a King or a Castle. LMS ROYAL SCOT CLASS I think the front of this engine could be different if the parts were available, and I wasn't able to do the wheel arches, but I'm happy with the tender and the shaping of the cab. SR KING ARTHUR CLASS I thought i'd try and to an engine from each of the major British steam companies. The obvious one for Southern was a Merchant Navy or West Country, but I've already done a lot of Pacific engines. BR STANDARD 4MT TANK The one major drawback is that it isn't motorised. I've been considering making a motorised carriage that would not only move un-motorised engines, but help the bigger motorised ones around the corners better. That, of course, comes with its own set of drawbacks. THE FLYING SAUSAGE (LNER 10000 - 'HUSH HUSH') I wasn't lying in the title, this is such a wonderfully absurd engine that I had to try it. my only major niggle is the colour scheme, but I suppose experimental engines are hardly worth sprucing up. I hope you've found these MOCs interesting, I'd love to hear any tips, comments or suggestions for future builds! I'm planning on building the Flying Scotsman before long, then maybe a set of coaches. -Isaac
  17. I hope this is the right forum to post this :) Recently I got challenged by my friend Felix to build a micro-scale steam locomotive. I have never tried building anything like this but I gotta say I was surprised how much fun it can be. The new pieces definitely open the whole another world of possibilities when it comes to tiny builds like this. And I am really quite pleased with the result :) If you want to build your own, I put together building instructions which you can get for free on Rebrickable!
  18. Jeffinslaw

    [MOC] Southern Pacific 4-10-2

    The 4-10-2 wheel arrangement, often referred to as the Southern Pacific for the railroad which put it to use most successfully, was a unique design that utilized three-cylinders instead of the traditional two. In terms of steam locomotive evolution, it followed the 2-10-2 Santa Fe but the American Locomotive Company's (Alco) desire to advance three-cylinder technology proved somewhat problematic, at least for the Union Pacific (which referred to its roster as "Overlands" for its Overland Route main line). The SP on the other hand found their fleet quite useful and reliable in regular service and continued to use them for nearly 30 years until diesels finally took over. Hey guys! I wanted to share my completed model of Southern Pacific's 4-10-2 steam engine. I designed this model myself taking inspiration from brass models of the engine and techniques from various builders here on EB and Flickr. This model took me several months to design, build, and test but it is finally completed! The best part? You can purchase your own set of instructions to build the same model! Yes, that's right. Have all of those amazing BMR rolling stock and maybe one or two of my SP & UP PFE cars but no engine to pull it? Well now you can build an expertly modeled steam engine that will fit in with your rolling stock perfectly. Instructions can be purchased here: https://www.bricktraindepot.com/product-page/southern-pacific-4-10-2 The model is powered by two XL PF motors, and a AAA battery box in the tender. An SBrick is housed in the tender as well. Features side rods by @zephyr1934. This engine can haul a LOT of rolling stock. Was going to test with all 45 of my train cars here soon but I am positive it will work exceptionally well. Let's get on to some pictures! Southern Pacific 4-10-2 by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Southern Pacific 4-10-2 by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Southern Pacific 4-10-2 by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Southern Pacific 4-10-2 by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Hope you guys like it! Let me know what you think. -Jeffinslaw
  19. Sérgio

    [MOC] CP110 - Steam 0-3-0

    Hi, Another try out to an old Portuguese Steam, CP110 This one is motorized with PF Train motor. I don´t know much about this loco, i just saw some H0 versions and try to do a Lego version. The layout its a proto version of "Serveja" i made several years ago . LEGO - CP110 by Sérgio Batista
  20. Hi! I haven't been very active here for a while, but I was busy "working" on some LDD models and revising them. Some of you might have seen them already on my flickr photostream. I also got to render my models for the first time Ok, I'll show you the pics My revised BR Standard Class 9F "Evening Star" I borrowed codefox421's coaches to try on the 9F (all credit for the coaches goes to him, here is the link to his topic: http://www.eurobrick...showtopic=97927 ) I also revised my GWR 14xx, but that'll be part of another topic soon Then I also rendered and (re) designed some rolling stock: From top left to bottom right: Cattle Wagon Tank Wagon Well Wagon Vent Van GWR 16 Ton Toad Brake Van BR 20 Ton Brake Van (brown livery) BR 20 Ton Brake Van (grey and yellow livery) I also designed a water tower: and a modular train station. This is one section: You can make it bigger: and build a pretty decent station: The station has too many parts to be rendered And another station building: I hope you enjoyed it Comments and criticisms are welcome! Greetings, Nick P.S.: You can see higher resolution pics on my flickr: http://www.flickr.co...s/94645638@N07/
  21. These are typical "concrete" steam locomotive coaling and water towers of the mid-1900's for North America. Both models feature lowering chutes / spouts, for the imaginary fuel to flow down into the waiting engine below. (Which in this case is a 0-6-0ST switcher locomotive that has been built for some time. You can see it in it's own thread here.) For the coal tower, I was inspired by the website LGauge. However, unlike my more recent smaller versions of said tower, I have gone back to the larger 2014 version with it's odd-stud dimensions. This means it's a lot taller, wider and has a ton more pieces than before. It also has two chains to hold the new chute at the optimum height to clear the roof-top's of locomotives, while not being to high to look silly. The rear of the coal tower. The girders in the rear are supposed to "hold" a conveyor bucket system to get coal to the top of the tower to replenish the supply inside the structure. Of course, since it's Lego, this system is imaginary. With the brand-new water tower design, however, I was inspired by my Father's work with a smaller version of the same basic idea. I enlarged the basic dimensions dramatically and used castle wall-top pieces to boost the structural integrity of the now 14 stud-wide model. The rear of the water tower. What you see above is what you will get in the ldd file, which is available here at Bricksafe. It's a slightly older model, but all it's missing is the two 16-L chains and the two 32 x 16 base plates. Enjoy the file, and as usual: comments, questions or complaints are always welcome!
  22. Im currently working on a 4-6-4 steamer. The past few days have been seeing it materialize on my Flickr. Thought id post here for anyone that wants to follow along, im keeping that updated as i go and ill try to remember to keep here current as well. Proof of concept chassis by SuRrEaLNJ, on Flickr Working on the clearance issues by SuRrEaLNJ, on Flickr Cab interior by SuRrEaLNJ, on Flickr the inspiration comes primarily from sava and cale's work comment, critiques, discussion welcome
  23. The 4-10-4 (four leading, ten driving, four trailing) "Rainhill" wheel arrangement was so named after the Rainhill Trials of October 1829 in Rainhill, England of which the famous Rocket was the only entrant to complete the Trials. The Rainhill type was designed in 1927 and built in early 1928, though it was originally called the "Gigantic" type, but the planned Centenary of Steam celebration sealed the deal on the naming of the type. (Unfortunately, the plans for the potential celebration were postponed in July 1928 and finally cancelled one day before the Stock Market Crash of 1929.) The steam locomotive prototype of the 4-10-4 Rainhill type was painted a dark red and gray color-scheme with a light gay box on the tender and was sold by Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1928 to Brick Railway Systems, but due to technical teething troubles and because of it's unusual color scheme was nicknamed the Red Demon. The engine worked the trans-continental route on the "pan-American Limited" passenger train from New York to Los Angeles, with the Red Devil or one of it's type worked the portion west from St. Louis to Las Vegas. The Red Demon original engine (number 7957) worked this route from 1930 until being bumped to freight duties in early 1958. The engine then worked freights with it's thirty-nine brother's in diminishing numbers until this one was sidelined in 1971, the last of it's kind. The Red Demon was pulled out of the mothballs in 1973 for potential use on the 1976 American Bicentennial train but politics intervened and Texas and Pacific 2-10-4 number 610 got the job instead. After that, the engine's future looked bleak until the "Save the Red Demon 7957" Committee was formed which raised enough money to restore the engine to working order by 1978 and has kept the engine indoors and in tip-top shape ever since under the Red Demon Incorporated moniker. This company uses five former Brick Railway Systems-styled coaches on fan trips, but they are wholly owned by Red Demon Inc. The tender features the name of the railroad (Brick Railway Systems) on it's side, with a light at the rear and a ladder to the top deck. In reality, there was no 4-10-4 type of steam locomotive. It was strangely skipped over in the age of steam... none of this wheel arrangement were ever built. The name Red Demon was chosen because the 4-14-4 type of Soviet Russia was the closest analogy to my loco... except mine works fine, while the Russian one never did much as it spread the track, ruined switches and pulled the freight cars' couplings apart due to it's raw power. The second reason for the name is the Red Devil, a heavily modified South African 4-8-4 engine with a gas producing combustion system and many modern improvements. That cape gauge engine worked beautifully, but was mothballed in 2003. As of 2018, however, the Red Devil is again puling fan trip trains in South Africa! The three regular coaches, all in the same color scheme as the engine. The Pan-American Limited's observation car. The whole train. Comments, Questions, Complaints, and Suggestions for the future are always welcome! EDIT 4/2/19: main post reformatted, pictures replaced with new ones and text updated.
  24. Left a good job in the city Workin' for the man ev'ry night and day And I never lost one minute of sleepin' Worryin' 'bout the way things might have been Big wheel keep on turnin' Proud Mary keep on burnin' Rollin', rollin', rollin' on the river First off: I saw a similar steamboat on LEGO Ideas several years ago and just finally got around to recreating it from the pictures provided. (the project sadly never made it past several hundred votes, it my memory is correct.) I modified it heavily into the version you see here with my own tweaks and twists in the design installed, such as I added a second funnel, revised the placement of said funnels to the front of the ship, and removed the roof off most of the second deck. Oh, and I added three whistles to the top of the pilot's cab like those in set 21317. (Steamboat Willie). Also, my version does NOT have a swing-open right side like the original Ideas model that was my inspiration... thus you cannot get at the inside, and why would you want to? Their is nothing inside at all anyway on my version, save for the blue deck chairs on the top level. The name of the ship is the Proud Mary, after the Creedence Clearwater Revival song of the same name (as quoted above), as I figured it would be appropriate. This model will go with the rest of my Western models, on my Wild West layout. The captain of the Proud Mary is Thaddeus Sweeney, better known as "Old Man Sweet-tooth", for his habit of chewing saltwater taffy when the going gets tough and and giving candy out to the little children whenever he lands at small towns and native american villages such as Lone Tree, Nebraska, or Fort Legoredo, Colorado. He usually plies his brand-new-for-1872 stern-wheel steamboat up and down the Rapid River, with the Missouri River in Iowa at one end, and the the mighty cliff face of Showdown Canyon Springs at the other end in the middle of Colorado. Thaddeus is the only one he trusts to handle his ship, as he says the Rapid River is too treacherous for many newer pilots, as the wrecks that litter the shoreline prove. However, even Captain Sweeney admits from time to time that age is catching up to him, and he has been looking for a suitable first mate for the Proud Mary for some time.