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Found 323 results

  1. BrickController2 is an Android and iOS application that allows you to control your Lego models using a compatible gamepad. It supports the following devices: - SBrick - BuWizz 1-2 - Lego Powered-Up devices: Boost, PUP HUB and Technic HUB (or Control+) - PF infrared (on Android devices having infrared emitter). Features: - Multiple profiles for a single creation - Multiple motor (or output) assignment to a single controller event - Different types of devices can be used at the same time - The same motor (or output) can be assigned to multiple controller events - Different joystick characteristic settings - Different button modes: normal button, simple toggle, ping-pong toggle, carousel toggle, ... - Train mode on joysticks - Normal and servo mode for the new Control+ motors BrickController 2 on the Google Play Store: BrickController2 android BrickController 2 is also available on the Apple App Store. BrickController2 iOS Video tutorial created by @kbalage (many thanks for this): And another great video by @kbalage: Older versions: BrickController Android application. It lets you to control Lego creations via Lego infra-red, SBrick and BuWizz V1 and V2 using any Android compatible game controller: Current version: BrickController 0.6 User guide: BrickController User Guide Minimum system requirement: Android 4.4 and bluetooth low energy support on the phone (or tablet) Video on the older SBrickController application:
  2. Hello i would like too present you my next truck an MAN TGS 8X8 The model features 8X8 drive via 2XL motors with 4 Speed gearbox which is shiftet via 1 M motor. Steering is done via 1 Servo motor. The model was build for good offroad performance and high power, it weights around 3kg. The maximum slope it can do was 60% which is 30°. It is also able too drive in the garden in the sand. The challenge was building a strong drive train with a 4 speed gearbox in the small space. The front axles are pendular as well as the rear, i testet the front even with springs but pendular worked for me better in the terrain. The model can even be driven with pf ir receveirs and battery box. The tipping is done via 1 L motor and a self build worm gear drive because a linear actuator was too big. This model is powerd by an buwizz which works great but also was challenging because i switcht mid building too it which meant i had too redo the gearbox many times because of the new power. If you got any questions feel free to ask
  3. HenrikLego

    Motorization question

    If anyone can help me out, will this work? Motorization by Henrik Lorentzen, on Flickr I am working on a large steam engine now and trying to find a way to motorize it. Do you think this will work, will add some more support to the technic cross axles, but the gearing? L-motor. I plan on putting another L-motor using the same technique on of the other wheels. But I want to check with some experts before I test this on a real build.
  4. Commander Wolf

    [MOC] 1:48 Pennsylvania Railroad B1

    Hi all, wanted to share this MOC as I "teased" it many years ago but did not finish it until now. I started building the B1 in an effort to build the smallest possible 1:48 scale PF model, but ended up building the slightly smaller A6b, and then later on the even smaller EMD Model 40. Since then the B1 has been sitting in a folder on my computer gathering virtual dust. Last year someone inquired about the model and I decided to finish it once and for all, and this is the result: This is a pretty simple model just by virtue of the small size: the build is basically the same as that of the A6, just larger due to the larger scale size of the locomotive. It actually has a lot of volume compared to something like the Model 40, but the shape of LEGO motors and electronic components means that you can basically never fully utilize the 6-wide space in an 8-wide model. The part of the model that stumped me initially was connecting the massive side frames to the body. I had tried a couple times to find a solution over the years, but I finally cheated by cartooning the tanks on the sides of the locomotive with plates such that I could fit structural components behind them. The pantograph can also move up and down! Anyway, here is my video going into more detail about the model, as well as a Brickshelf gallery (when moderated).
  5. The idea with this is project is to get speed from buggy motors, and torque from PU XLs, which have a very convenient shape. Powering the hungry buggy motors from 2 buwizz units and the PU XLs from the big technic hub, which will be in the rear and controlling it with the buwizz app. Servo for steering, PU L for fake v8. Perfect car. I would enter it in the mad max contest but 2 things stop me. 1, I doubt I will finish in time and 2, I don’t have any real buggy motors and will be using fake ones.
  6. This and last year we got interesting Control+ electrical system that gave wider RC possibilities. They have a lot of advantages and disadvantages that were discussed here a lot in the different topics. My input here it the thing that still bothers me: The sets with motor(s), usually with a single one, purposed to move some actuators, rotate some turntables, give some air pressure (42053, 42055, for instance) Or their "manual" brothers that have the same functions powered by a manual knob(s) with possibility to add a motor to them (42029) So, why I'm talking about them? Just because these set categories have the thing that is common for them and looks useless and pointless without PF-motorization (not RC-control for drive&steer): the distribution and/or direction gearbox. You have a single motor and many levers that turns on and off some machinery functions powered by this motor. Alternatively, they have a single knob (which not very nice for play - rotate and rotate it moving some LAs, ughhh) but just made to be replaced with a motor. Other "pure-manual" sets have a lot of knobs - each for each own function, outrigger, winch, etc. One function - one knob. It is great for play with no motors, so you can raise the crane arm and release the rope at the same time just by spinning two opposite knobs (42108). My concern is, if we have Control+ as a PF replacement and still got no affordable and compact "static power source" (LiPo or a battery box) for a single Control+ motor, does it mean that we may have no "motorized" set with gearboxes in further? Updated 2020-01-30: soon we will know if 42113 Bell Osprey have a "dummy" power unit, or something else... So far we only know that the infographic presented on PoweredUp overview may be still actual. Notice the central section with a simple hub:
  7. Hi there as nobody else yet presented a PF mod of the 42109 car (@ozacek?), I gave it a try yesterday afternoon/evening and did a quick & dirty PF mod. The result is a replica that's not totally identical in all details but comes very close to the original from the outside with considerable changes on the chassis. Differences: * Very obvious, the colors, but that was not important for the intended task. Initially I wanted to build it in red and black, but soon switched to orange and black and later just ignored the colors to save time when searching the needed parts - I have two many models built ATM and hence am low on some essential parts in the initially desired colors. The upcoming digital model(s) will use (a) more pleasing color combination(s). * The beam connecting both sides of the cockpit was moved 1 stud forward and was constructed differently to hold the PF AA battery box in place * As I couldn't find a position for the PF Servo motor that is low enough that the hood can be closed as much as in the original 42109, I used a 1 x 9 bent liftarm to fix the hood at an elevated position, imitating the look of a huge hood scoop. This way the hood is kept shut very tightly btw. * I used curved 11 x 3 panels with 2 pin holes for the side skirts, as I find them visually more pleasing then what was used in the original 42109. * The chassis is somewhat different: Instead of 11 x 7 frames I used 7 x 5 frames as I don't have 11 x 7 frames yet; 8L axles with stop for each rear wheel - so the axles can't be pulled out, but the wheels can still get loose, though I haven't seen this yet during driving and some other minor differences. The car doesn't use a differential but drives each rear wheel with a single PF L motor. Power Functions parts used: * 2 x PF L motor * 1 x PF Servo motor * 1 x PF IR V2 receiver - optional (not needed with BuWizz) * 1 x PF IR remote control - optional (not needed with BuWizz) * 1 x PF AA battery box - optional (not needed with BuWizz) [* 1 x PF control switch - actually not really needed, if the drive lines are set up in a way that both PF L motors can run in the same direction (not needed with BuWizz)] I.e. the PF equipment that came with the 9398 - not that I have one. Enough talking/writing, here are three shots, digital model(s) will come later: Using a BuWizz instead of the PF remote control equipment saves a lot of space and weight and will make this car faster. So far I haven't used it with fresh AA batteries but only with used AA batteries and a BuWizz and even in normal mode the car seems to be quicker, not to speak of fast and ludicrous modes, where the wheels start slipping on carpet and laminate floor when going backwards at full speed in fast mode or both ways at full speed in ludicrous mode.
  8. Hi All, I'm new to this forum, and new to the Lego RC train world. I have just started collecting this range with my son (who's 5) so this is mostly about me.... :) In all seriousness, he is over the moon with these trains and the sets in general and we have 3 already (60051, 60197 and 60198). I'm looking for some expert guidance as to the best and most cost effective way to be able to remotely control/motorise the switch tracks (points). Having done some research online, I see there are many ways, although i haven't found a definitive step by step guide yet. It would be good to get some valuable feedback and guidance from someone who has been through this process if possible (i.e method and functionality vs cost and practicality). Appreciate the time spent reading my post and any feedback received. James.
  9. Hardly finished anything on this model, but felt like sharing the progress so far anyway. Building this is the goal: Here's a video which shows various functions of the batmobile in the game: I am planning to add the following functions: -2x XL motor for 4WD (I expect the total weight to be about 3-4kg, so I reckon I could use their power. I am a little afraid of breaking gears/axles, so still have L motors as a backup plan. -2 servo motors which are going to provide 3 ways of steering: Normal drive with airflaps to assist steering (as seen in the video) 360 degree turn on the spot (unfortunately not in the video but it can do this) Battle tank mode with crab steering -2 M motors for the turret and opening the cockpit for Batman to get in (I expect to add that function anyway besides the 2 functions I want for the turret) -9 PF lights, among which 1 set for the afterburner in "normal drive mode" I wanted to built this model since Januari, I even briefly considered it for TC7, but Jim and I both agreed that this vehicle fails the "looks like a normal car in non-battle mode" Meanwhile some other people on Eurobricks had a crack at the model (click en clicker) I liked the first topic alot for the CGI pictures of the batmobile like this, because seeing all the details on a model that's mostly black ingame is kind of hard. The fact that Warner Bros cancelled the version of the game that came with a scale model of the batmobile didn't help either, luckily these pictures also help for getting the scale right in the MOC. The second topic is pretty nice for some of his brickbuild solutions. An area I am not too familiar with since I built mostly Technic and lack knowledge of normal Lego parts. Two things I don't like about the second model: the wheels are too small (or the model too big for the wheels), especially shows around the wheelarches, but the wheelarches on my model are too thick too, but not as much as this one I think. The other thing is that he cut and drilled some parts to fit the model. I like to find solutions within the Lego system, so modding is a big no-no for me. Anywho, time for some pictures. It isn't much (not even in time invested, since I just did a little every moment I had time for it), but at least I can copy-paste to the other side instantly, assuming I don't have to make adjustments (as if lol) The midsection is just for me to get a rough idea of how it will look (leaning on a BB so it won't fall over). So it's lacking details just about everywhere in that section. Wheels and stuff missing some details too, but I want to get a functional model first. Every wheel needed to have 3 things: drive, steering and lights. The real model has electro motors on each wheel, I briefly considered mounting a M or L motor on the side and have it drive the wheel, but getting it locked in place there wouldn't look right with the actual model (wire of the L motor basically going over the inner tire). One thing I haven't looked into though is making my own rims for the tires, I will see how this works out first. The wires for the lights have been in many places and this is just about the only place where they don't interfere with the steering and driving gears. Here you can also see the main reason why my wheelarch is too thick: I needed 2 studs to fit those functions above the wheel. I am afraid the structure holding the wheels proves to be too weak for the full model, so might have to reinforce that later on. XL motor's spot is up for the debate. It will probably end 2 studs lower. Gear ratio at the moment is 1:1 (I think), not sure which way I am going to go with that since the XL is known to break gears and axles Battle tank crab steering mode. My model won't make 360+ turns with the wheels, nor even 180 degrees for 2 reasons - 360+ I am not feeling because of the wires getting tangled up - 180 degrees isn't going to really work with the servo. I want to use the servo for snappy steering like the real thing. The liftarm for the steering is a stud closer to the middle of the car than i'd like, but this was the spot to at least get a 100-120 degree turn. One servo will function as a gearbox between the different driving modes while the other servo just steers. I chose this setup to be able to switch quickly between steering modes, just like in the game. Lights had to be used on this model. I am still looking for a way to get the lights to turn red when he enters battle mode, but I don't know where or how (open for suggestions). The reason the rear doesn't have 3 lights on the wheel (does ingame), is because these are rarely shown (battle mode only, and only with the wheel at an angle). In case you wonder about some angles in this model. Pretty early in the build I lost track of what's 100% clean so I just began testing stuff by fixing a liftarm on 1 side and lining it up with the hole I wanted to use on the other end. If I could spin an axle freely in this hole, I gave it the thumbs up, if not, back to looking for another solution. One funny spot on the model where there is pressure, is at the rear, thanks to the freaking 12L soft axles, which quite frankly aren't acting so soft! If the soft axles aren't locked into to place the triangle above the rear lights aren't pushed into the 5x7 panles on the top, they push them slightly in when they are connected Some panels are only fixed in 1 spot, to give them room to move slightly around another panel/axle/liftarm if needed. I noticed a little late that some photo's are a little blurry, sorry, will check it next time. Next up: the actual chassis.
  10. Silicon Valley, California, is not particularly well-known for trains, nor public transit in general. Caltrain operates a commuter service along the peninsula. While most of its modern rolling stock is too large for regular track at my typical 1:48 scale, they also own and operate a pair of MP15DC switchers: EMD offered the MP15DC as a successor to the SW1500 series of switcher, the key difference being longer standard trucks and a higher top speed. Caltrain's two units (#503 and #504) were acquired from Union Pacific, which in turn acquired them from Southern Pacific. I believe the two are usually based in San Jose, though they can be seen up and down the peninsula running various maintenance-of-way jobs or "rescuing" stalled Caltrain commuter sets. This is the first "normal" diesel locomotive I've built in a long time, and the first time I've built something local. It's relatively straightforward mechanically: two 9V "mini-motors", one driving each truck, with the battery box in between them and the receiver in the cab. Pulling power is plentiful as the locomotive is reasonably heavy for its size. Pressing down on the single exposed stud on the hood powers the battery box on/off, and the power state can be checked via the small clear window on the hood. I took advantage of many recently-introduced parts on this model, such as they grey Collectible Minifig base which I used to plate over the sides and hide the works. Grey 1 x 2 x 2 windows, truncated corner tiles, and 2 x 1 wedges are relatively recent parts that help capture the shape of this locomotive. One innovation is an improvement on the technique I used for the cab windows on the TP56 locomotive. In this model, each "half" window is held captive by rotated tiles, greatly simplifying construction (a technique that @Commander Wolf absolutely loathes). The full Brickshelf gallery is here, pending moderation. I also took a number of work-in-progress screenshots in LDD, which you might find useful. Until next time, and may your commuter train never have to be rescued by one of these!
  11. Today I present my LEGO version of the famous German VT 11.5 Trans Europ Express – or just TEE. If you want to know a bit more about the real train, wikipedia helps: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DB_Class_VT_11.5 (Picture used with kind permission of Ulrich Budde © http://www.bundesbahnzeit.de/) It took me a while to finalize this model but I was busy on my building desk the last couple of weeks. From the specifications: 6 units in total (2 engine units and 4 waggons) 3 Power Functions train motors (2 in the front engine unit, on in the back) LEGO LED lights for the train front and end lights 7-wide (my favourite width for LEGO MOC trains) total length ca. 2.5 meters runs through standard LEGO track geometry (even if it looks silly), I prefer BrickTracks curves and TrixBrix/4DBrix switches custom LEGO parts: none modified LEGO parts: 2x 2x4 tile with the TEE logo by http://www.steindrucker.com yellow sticker on the coupling cover from an old LEGO sticker sheet Non-LEGO items – a piece of red tape to cover the center LED on the nose – interior lights using mini battery powered LEDs (source: ebay, search for "LED mini fairy string light") – Trans Europ Express decal by http://www.modellbahndecals.de/ in scale 1:45 It started all with the idea to use two Brick, Round Corner 3 x 3 x 2 Dome Top for the characteristic nose of the engine units. A much bigger challenge were the grey-silver stripe which swings from the lower front lights up to the driver's cabin. For a long time I favoured a solution using rigid hoses, but it didn't work out and the hose did not "swing". So I ended with the plate variant, at least I did not build any steps. I also realised the round bull's-eye windows. The first one has to be located as close as possible to the end of the tan section. So the arched brick helped here. We still miss an element which fits between the 1 x 3 x 2 arch and the larger 1 x 6 x 3 arch. But I found a solution using curved solpes covering most of that gap. I am still stuggling with the right colour of the roof section behind the driver's cabin. Originally it should be light bluish grey (same colour as the stripe). But in real live all the grime from the exhausts makes this roof look more dark/dirty. So I also build a dark bluish grey variant. Both can be swaped easily and this feature allows easy access to the rechargeable battery box. Which colour do you prefer for this roof section? The rest of the roof also was a nice building experience using some SNOT. I wanted to use dopple-cheese pieces and curves slopes. And the roof should become 7 studs wide. That did not equal out fine so I had to use vertical tile on both sides of the middle brick column. The picture explains the rest of that SNOT nightmare … But now enjoy some pictures: More pictures in various sizes on Flickr! Best regards, Holger
  12. Zerobricks

    Tiger 6x6

    This is an expansion, upgrade and update of the Tiger 4 x 4 x 4 The idea was to improve certain aspects of the 4x4 version: 1. The bewel gears were the weak part of the driveline, so the 6x6 uses additional 12:20 gearing after bewel gears, increasing available torque by 67% 2. Adding a second rear axle additonally helps to spread the load while climbing, increasing available overall torque by another 50%, allowing for a total of 2,5x more torque than 4x4. 3. Using defender wheels, and self-built hubs the pivot point is now a stud closer to the steering wheel and steering angle is increased from 18 to 25-30 degrees, removing the need for rear steering. 4. Center section was widened by 2 studs, allowing both gearboxes to be placed in parallel and the steering servo motor low in the center. Total gear reduction has been increased to 1:5 in high gear and 1:15 in low gear. Gear switching mechanism is now faster and more reliable. 5. Suspension is now pendular with a shock absorber in front and tandem axles with shock absorbes in the back. This allows the suspension to smoothly adjust to the terrain at slow speeds without wasting energy compressing the shock absorbers. At high speeds the shock aborbers smooth out the ride. In the picture below you can see the blue 1x7 beams which swing and allow the front suspension to act like pendular: 6. The model now has working fake engine(s) and steering wheel.I'm thinking of adding a hook arm with a winch in the back, so I can use this model to pull others out during trial truck races 7. Number of motors have been reduced by removing rear wheel steering and having one motor for the gearbox, allowing to add aditional functions as before mentioned hook arm. So...that's all about it for now, I'm only missing defender wheels to finish this monster. Yes it's going to be heavier and slower, but I expect it to be even more capable and reliable.
  13. Hi,I thought about making an App for controlling Lego Power Functions 1.0(not PU). And now I am done with programming this app, without any programming knowledge. In the next updates I am going to make a PU remote too, so you can combine different Lego Sets and I want to make a Mini Jack IR Blaster Support for smartphones, that hadn t an IR blaster built in. Right now the App is only for devices with built in IR blaster. I know there was an App before for controlling Lego Power Functions, but this app had some features that weren t pretty good. This is also one of the reasons why I made this kind of App. Please open the Play Store Link on your smartphone.Play Store Link for the App: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.pfremote.sucho.pfremoteYouTube Link for Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-QLA-nDtHY
  14. Commander Wolf

    [MOC/WiP] China Railways QJ with PF!

    Hi, all! After piddling around with some small projects for the past few months, I decided it was time for a challenge! I'm building a Power Functions steam locomotive where the locomotive is powered (as opposed to a tender). To make things harder, the prototype isn't some small shunter, but the 2-10-2 China Railways QJ: The QJ is a fairly large mainline engine whose roots can be traced back to the various German 2-10-0s used extensively during WWII. Its primary claim to fame is probably the longevity of the design and quantity of units built - 4700 between 1956 and 1988. The QJ was used extensively on Chinese mainlines throughout the latter half of the 20th century, and a few soldered on in revenue service toward the end of the 2000s. Three survive in the US, two owned by Iowa Interstate, and one by RJ Corman. Anyway, I've decided to do a log of the build and share some of the process. We'll see how this goes. As always, the first step for me is finding drawings. I had previously wanted to try my hand at some smaller Chinese locos like the SY or JS, but having not found any drawings, the QJ was it. Resized to my usual scale of 15" per stud, it looks like this: The next task is to decide on the layout of the chassis. The "obvious" way to do it would be Emerald Night style - 2-10-2 with a blind-flange-blind-flange-blind configuration for the 10-coupled section, but this method results in a lot of overhang on curves, especially so if the body is attached directly to the 10-coupled section, and I really don't like that. That and other issues with the 10-coupled arrangement led me to look at more fun (complicated) designs, and I eventually settled on the following: This is a 2-2-4-4-2 articulation where the cylinders are actually locked to the middle 4 wheels because that's where the drive rods will connect. This arrangement lets me have driving and connecting rods across all flanged drivers, which I really like, and this also keeps the maximum width of the chassis at 9 studs at the cylinders. Yes, the 3rd and 4th axles aren't visually connected, but I would prefer having a gap over a thick or uneven connecting rod (full/overlapped half beams). At this point I had a vague idea of how I'd connect everything together, so I dumped it into LDD to sketch out the overall shape. Here I've just thrown together my intial thoughts of how I'd build various parts of the loco just to line things up with the drawing and evaluate the overall look and feel. I start like this because to me it's much more important that the overall proportions of a locomotive are correct and less important that individual details are all modeled. Now we can start on the detailed design. The first issue I tackled was the all-important method by which I'd connect all the axles that weren't already linked with connecting rods. To that end, I had known I would probably use a mechanism I had already used multiple times in the past, but I spent a lot of time trying to make it more rigid and compact. I also discovered how much easier it is to compact various assemblies by going to an all-studless chassis. Next up, connecting motors to the now coupled drivers. This has proven to be by far the most difficult part so far. One of the things that's really important to me is minimizing the overhang of the locomotive body inside and outside when it goes around a curve. To adjust this, you can move where the body pivots on the chassis (typically two points, one toward the front and one toward the rear - on a diesel these are the points at which the body connects to the bogies) forward and backward. The catch is, now the drivetrain connecting the motors to the wheels has to flex through these points as well. I settled on an initial design like this: As you can see, the drive train comes up from the last driven axle through the point at which the trailing axle is connected. Then it goes backward and there's a univeral joint through the point at which the body is connected to the last axle. How the motors are supposed to be joined to each other and to the wheels is still unclear here. At this point, I decided to make a mockup and do a test run, because you never know if things you make in LDD are going to work in reality or not. In this case, it did not. Turns out that the joint above the last driven axle was far too flimsy, and trying to transmit any significant amount of torque through it would throw the rear drivers off the track. And so here I am at the moment: This is actually the first design that made it around my test track, and it seems to do so fairly reliably for now. You can see the (yellow) more rigid redesign of the flimsy transmission and the (orange) more detailed design of the first driven axle. The actual testbed is not quite as pretty colored: More updates to come, stay tuned!
  15. Hello all! I recently bought myself a BuWizz 2.0 and I've been experimenting with transmission designs using the new Chiron shifting bits and gears. I'm trying to figure out how to control a servo with the BuWizz unit in such a way that it only has full left, centered, and full right as options for a 3 speed transmission. The closest thing I can find is the light buttons in the control setup, but they only allow for center and full lock in one direction. Has anyone figured out a good way to control a servo like this or found a clean way around it? Thanks!
  16. Hi all! Is there any chain that's stronger than the rather pitiful technic links? I've been wanting LEGO to make sturdy chain links using the large treads forever now, and if they do have something like that I'm unaware of it. But is there a stronger chain available from LEGO, or should I just resort to buying and cutting up some tread links? I'm picturing something pretty similar in size to the chains found in K'NEX roller coaster sets. Thanks in advance for the guidance and/or bad news! :P I'm working on a somewhat realistic boxer engine for an MOC. I thought it would be interesting to have XL motors where the camshafts would be and have the timing belt (technic chain) actually drive the thing, but of course the old links are far too weak to handle one motor, much less two. I'd like to use the large tread links since they're plenty strong enough, but the tread face is five studs wide and would 1) be obviously unrealistic, and 2) take up most of the space in the engine bay. If I have to I'll use two chains next to each other and hope that holds, but if I can I'd like to keep it as narrow as possible. Cheers!
  17. RoxYourBlox

    Billy Goat's Steamboat

    I designed and built my latest Lego vehicle, “Billy Goat’s Steamboat,” for Eurobricks’ bonus collaboration, “The Great GOAT Boat Race,” displayed at Brickworld Chicago 2019. The steamboat is my first boat MOC since childhood. There were no rules for this collab except that it had to be a boat featuring a goat. The hull was modified from an earlier MOC, Joker’s Blimp (lower right), but in place of cross axle supports inside, I used 11x11 quarter gears (upper right), anchored apart by a couple layers of plates to hold the shape. Underneath there are wheels to easily move the boat, however the total weight kept Billy Goat’s boat from gathering enough steam to move from the pair of independently rotating PF-enabled paddle wheels. Oh well, such is the the typical pitfall of designing entirely in LDD prior to testing with real bricks. Billy Goat’s Steamboat was nominated for Best Sea Vessel at Brickworld Chicago 2019.
  18. Hello! In march I completed my latest Moc, and today I took some photos. It's a wheel loader Volvo L 350H in 1.22 scale. It is an updated version of L 350G by Lego, which I used as parts pack. The bucket is in 1.22 scale, so I decided to build in this scale. I used XL motor for driving, and M motor for steering, by 2 mini LAs. Arm and bucket are controlled by L and M motors, and they have quite good movement range. Battery box and receivers are inside the bonnet. The tyres are third party, 96mm diameter. Sticker are home made! I hope you like it!
  19. I started this project because I wanted to share my experiences building various offroad models over the last decade. This topic is meant to guide the builders with comparisments, suggestion and best building practices, It is however not a place to find already finished and perfected designs - that's up to you. Various aspects of the design of the vehicles will be split into several subgroups and explained in details. 1. Number of wheels First thing we need to know is how many wheels our design will have. Most common setups are as following: 4x4 Setup Advantages: 1. The simplest and most widely setup 2. Having only 4 wheels means lower weight and higher performance 3. Higher manoeuverability 4. Simple suspension and driveline design Disadvantages: 1. With only 4 wheels the suspension has to be designed to be as flexible as possible to get the most out of the wheels 2. In a case of a mechanical failure of a single wheel, the whole model's performance is greatly affected 6x6 Setup with double rear axles Advantages: 1. Two rear axle provide more traction area, especially when going uphill 2. Usually 6x6 vehicles are longer than 4x4 and therefore less likely to tip over 3. Since the front and second axle are usually closer than in 4x4 setup, there is less ground clearance needed between them 4. Greater redundancy in a case of a mechanical failure Disadvantages: 1. Lower manoeuverability due to a longer wheelbase even with rear wheel steering 2. More complex driveline and suspension design is required 8x8 or more wheels setup Advantages: 1. Having 8 or more allows for much greater traction area 2. Ability to drive over ditches 3. Because wheels are usually much closer there is much less chances of getting stuck on top of an obstacle 4. Excellent redundancy in a case of a mechanical failure 5. Better weight distribution 6. Less suspension travel required per each wheel as with 4x4 or 6x6 and hence better stability Disadvantages: 1. Lower manoeuverability even with rear wheel steering 2. Powering 8 or more requires a very complex driveline 3. Depending on a driveline, combined torque required for powering all 8 wheels can destroy gears if a single wheel gets stuck 2. Type of wheels and tyres Now that we decided on how many wheels we want for our offroad beast, we have to look into what type of tyres and wheels we want to use. I will hereby cover only the bigger types of tyres and wheels. 1. 94.8x44R Advantages: 1. Low weight 2. Good thread design 3. Low rolling resistance Disadvantages: 1. Low traction, these tyres are prone to slip on the rim at high loads 2. Due to its rounded shape the tyres tend to slide off obstacles when crawling over them 2. 94.3x38R Advantages: 1. Low weight 2. Medium traction 3. Low rolling resistance 4. Realistic design and proportions Disadvantages: 1. Shallow thread pattern 2. These tyres are very hard and don't adjust to the terrain 3. 107x44R Advantages: 1. Low weight 2. Medium traction 3. Very deep thread 4. Currently largest tyres by diameter Disadvantages: 1. High rolling restistance and vibrations due to the thread pattern 2. These tyres are a bit hard and don't adjust to the terrain 4. Power Puller tyres Advantages: 1. High traction 2. Good thread 3. Largest Lego tyres ever produced 4. Deep wheel offset Disadvantages: 1. High weight 2. Hard to use, they require complex hub assemblies 3. Very rare and expensive 5. Outdoor challenger wheels Advantages: 1. Very high traction 2. Very good thread pattern 3. Deep wheel offset 4. Over 7 studs of space inside the wheel Disadvantages: 1. High weight 2. Hard to attach to the standard axles 3. They require a lot of torque to use them at their full potential. 6. Tumbler wheels Advantages: 1. Low weight 2. High traction 3. Very flexible Disadvantages: 1. Low thread pattern 2. Small size 3. Expensive For the 94.8x44R. 94.3x38R and 107x44R tyres we have a choice of two wheels: 1. Racing wheel large Advantages: 1. Good mounting option with axlehole and pinhole 2. Available in multiple colours 3. Cheap Disadvantages: 1. No inside wheel offset means steering pivot point can't be placed inside the wheel. 1. Futuristic wheel Advantages: 1. Deep wheel offset allows us to place steering pivot point inside or closer to the wheel than racing wheel large 2. Slightly larger wheel size stops the 94.8x44R tyre from slipping on the rim Disadvantages: 1. Limited mounting options, with only one axlehole 2. Hard to find 3. Hubs Now that we have our wheels and tyres we need a way to mount and power them. Here are the most common currently available options: 1. New standard ungeared CV hubs These hubs are usually driven by the CV joint counterpart which pops inside Advantages: 1. Low steering pivot offset - usually at the edge of the tyre: 2. Firm wheel mounting 3. Readily available, easy to use and to build on. Disadvantages: 1. Low operating angle - the CV joint can operate to a maximum of about 30 degrees, which limits steering angle. 2. Very low torque transfer - the CV joints are prone to deforming and popping out even with low torque applies to them 3. Low ground clearance 2. Old ungeared CV hubs Advantages: 1. Low steering pivot offset - usually at the edge of the tyre 2. Firm wheel mounting 3. Better ground clearance than newer hubs Disadvantages: 1. Very low operating angle - the CV joint can operate to a maximum of about 25 degrees, which limits steering angle. 2. Very low torque transfer - the CV joints are prone to deforming and popping out even with low torque applies to them 3. Hard to find and expensive 4. No other mounting points than 4 ball joints 3. Built cardan ungeared hubs Example of a hub using a cardan joint to directly transfer the power to the wheel Advantages: 1. Low steering pivot offset - usually at the edge of the tyre 2. Easy to build 3. Can transfer higher torque than a CV joint 4. Higher steering angle Disadvantages: 1. Mounting relies only on the axle and is not as firm as standard hubs 2. Not capable of transferring high torque to the wheels 3. Low ground clearance 4. Standard portal hubs Advantages: 1. Easy to use and to build on. 2. Can transfer very high torque to the wheels when using 8z and 24Z gear combination 3. High steering angle 4. High ground clearance 5. Firm wheel mounting Disadvantages: 1. Very high steering pivot offset - requires stronger steering mechanisms and more fender space for wheel to swing 5. Built portal hubs Advantages: 1. Easy to build. 2. Can transfer very high torque to the wheels when using 8z and 24Z gear combination 3. High steering angle 4. Higher ground clearance than standard portal hubs 5. Low steering pivot offset when using futuristic wheels Disadvantages: 1. Wheels are mounted and held only by one axle, not as firm as standard hubs 2. Hub relies on friction of the components to keep it together, which can slide apart after prolonged use 6. Built planetary hub Advantages: 1. Highest gear ratio of all other hubs, 1:4 2. Firm wheel mounting when using futuristic of power puller wheels 3. High steering angle 4. Lower steering offset than standard portal hubs Disadvantages: 1. Requires old turntable, futuristic or power puller wheels for best results - all are hard to find 2. High number of moving gears 3. Least efficient due to the high friction caused by the large surface contact area and number of moving gears 4. Suspension Suspension is the mechanism that will keep our model's wheels in contact to the ground and will be supporting most of its weight. Most of the designs cover 4x4's Following factors determine the type of suspension system we will use: 1. Weight of the model - The heavier the model, the stronger the suspension components have to be 2. Speed - Faster models require more responsive suspension systems with low unsprung weight 3. Flexibility - The higher the obstacles you want to climb over the more flex and/or wheel travel suspension has to provide 1. No suspension I have yet to see and offroad vehicle without any type of suspension (except for maybe 42070, 42081 and 42082), but I will list my opinion regardless: Advantages: 1. Simple design - having no suspension simplifies our design...and that's about it Disadvantages: 1. No flex over terrain means, there are only 3 wheels at once touching the ground 2. Low stability 3. Poor weight distribution 4. No shock absorption at high speeds 2. Pendular suspension This is the simplest suspension you can put on your vehicle. It basically means one or more of your axles are free to swing about. When using this suspension I suggest using the small turntable where drive axle enters the axle. This will keep the drive axle from carrying the weight of the model, which causes unnecessary friction. 42030 is a typical example of this suspension system. Advantages: 1. Simple, robust design 2. Using this suspension on both axles can give the model very high flexibility 3. If there are no springs used, the model can have perfect weight distribution on left and right wheel Disadvantages: 1. Large unsprung weight, poor responsivness at high speeds 2. No shock absorption means this suspension is not suitable for high speeds 2. When using on one axle, the stability of the whole model relies on the unsuspended axle. 3. When using pendular suspension on both axles springs or a transfer mechanism are required to keep the model upright 3. Single torque tube suspension This suspension became available with the release of the 8110 Unimog. Best examples of this suspension are 8110, 9398 and 41999. It is the simplest suspension which also allows for vertical suspension movement. Advantages: 1. Simple, robust design 2. Universal joints can be placed inside the ball joint, allowing power to be transferred to the axle 3. Easy to implement Disadvantages: 1. Large unsprung weight, poor responsivness at high speeds 2. Axle requires a some kind of a linkage system to keep it cenetred (panhard or parallel links as seen above). 3. Using this suspension on the front axle usually results in negative caster angle which causes higher rolling resistance 4. When used on rear drive axle, the suspension has the tendency to cause oscillate, especially with soft suspension and high power 4. Hard to connect springs to the chassis 4. Double torque tube suspension This is an evolution of the single torque tube suspension, which uses two ball joints to drive each wheel side respectively. It is my own original idea. Advantages: 1. Simple, robust design 2. Universal joints can be placed inside the ball joint, allowing power to be transferred to the axle 3. Easy to implement 4. Self-cenetring, since axles are connected in the center there is no need for linkages to center it 5. Can carry power to each wheel side independently 6. Drive torque compensation Disadvantages: 1. Large unsprung weight, poor responsivness at high speeds 2. Using this suspension on the front axle usually results in negative caster angle which causes higher rolling resistance 3. When used on rear drive axle, the suspension has the tendency to cause oscillate, especially with soft suspension and high power 4. Hard to connect springs to the chassis 5. Parallel floating axle This suspension uses linkages which keep the axle parallel to the chassis of the model. For best functionality and reliability the lengths of all links and that of the double cardan joint should be equal. Also all the linkages and drive axles should be parallel. Advantages: 1. Keeping the axle parallel to the chassis reduces the oscillations effect 2. Better responsivness compared to the torque tubes 3. Neutral caster angle when used on front axles. 4. Self cenetring when using A arm as upper link or 4 link setup 5. Can be configured to carry power to each wheel side independently 6. If configured to carry power to each wheel side independently the drive torque can be compensated. 7. Easy to connect spring to the chassis Disadvantages: 1. High unsprung weight, less responsive at high speeds 2. Increased mechanical complexity, double cardan joints required to carry the power to the axle 6. Half axle independent suspension This is the simplest independent suspension you can build. Best example of such suspension are Tatra and Pinzgauer trucks. Advantages: 1. Independent suspension with low unspring weight, suitable for high speed 2. Robust design with low number of moving parts 3. Easy to connect spring to the chassis Disadvantages: 1. Changes of the caster angle as the wheels travel up and down 2. Hard to implement a drive system that does not carry the weight of the vehicle 3. Hard to implement steering system 4. Wheels tend to drag sideways on the ground when suspension travels up and down, reducing efficiency 7. Trailing arm parallel independent suspension Personally I have not used this suspension yet, but I did use a normal trailing arm suspension which does not keep the hubs parallel. Normal trailing arm suspension which does not keep the hubs parallel acts similarly to torque tube suspension. For the prallel version of the trailing suspension I imagine the following: Advantages: 1. Independent suspension with low unspring weight, suitable for high speed 2. Robust design with low number of moving parts 3. Long links allow for high suspension travel 4. Very easy to connect spring to the chassis 5. Can be configured to carry power to each wheel side independently Disadvantages: 1. Hard to keep the wheels from sagging under the weight of the model. 2. Difficult to transfer power to the wheels 8. Double wishbone suspension This suspension uses two A-shaped arms to keep the wheel hubs in place. As of late it's my favourite suspension system due to: Advantages: 1. Independent suspension with low unspring weight, suitable for high speed 2. Very customizable design with lots of adjustable characteristics (suspension arm lengths, caster angle, camber angle, steering geometries) 3. When build correctly it is far more robust than live axle suspension 4. Increased ground clearance compared to live axle suspension, especially when used with portal hubs 5. Can be configured to carry power to each wheel side independently 6. Extremely easy mounting of springs 7. Very stable compared to live axles 8. Frame holding the suspension can be part of the chassis, therebye lowering the center of gravity Disadvantages: 1. More moving parts as live axle suspension, increased mechanical complexity 2. Limited wheel travel - Lego wishbones allow a max. of around 25 degrees of suspension angle 9. Multi-link suspension To be updated when I build my first multi-link offroad suspension. I can assume the following characteristics: 1. Independent suspension with low unspuing weight, suitable for high speed 2. Extremely customizable design with lots of adjustable charactersitics (suspension arm lengths, caster angle, camber angle, steering geometries, virtual pivot point) 3. Large steering pivot point compensation 4. Increased ground clearance compared to live axle suspension, especially when used with portal hubs 5. Can be configured to carry power to each wheel side independently 6. Very stable compared to live axles 7. Frame holding the suspension can be part of the chassis, thereby lowering the center of gravity Disadvantages: 1. Very high amount of moving parts, increased mechanical complexity 2. Limited wheel travel - Lego wishbones allow a max. of around 25 degrees of suspension angle 3. Hard to connect springs to the chassis 10. Spring types Listed below are the most common types of springs available: 6.5L Soft shock absorber Advantages: 1. Small, easy to implement Disadvantages: 1. One stud of suspension travel 2. Low spring rate, can't support heavy models 6.5L Hard shock absorber 1. Small, easy to implement 2. High spring rate, can support heavy models Disadvantages: 1. One stud of suspension travel 9L soft shock absorber When using 9L shock absorbers I suggest you do not use the default offset upper attachment point, but use an in-line attachment point instead. This will reduce the friction and allow for better high speed performance Example: Advantages: 1. Two studs of suspension travel 2. More attachment possibilities than 6.5 L shock absorber Disadvantages: 1. Default attachment points create friction 2. Low spring rate, can't support heavy models 9L hard shock absorber Advantages: 1. Two studs of suspension travel 2. More attachment possibilities than 6.5 L shock absorber 3. High spring rate, can support heavy models Disadvantages: 1. Default attachment points create friction 2. Rare and expensive 11. Attaching springs to live axles If we start with basics, the first things we have to check is how position of springs affects suspension of live axles. The closer you place the springs together, the more flex the suspension will have, but it will also be less stable: I suggest you to keep springs at a distance of around 1/2 of the total model width. When placing springs you should keep them in-line with the wheel bearing in order to reduce friction. First example of bad spring placements: And example of good spring placement: When using multiple springs make sure to place them symmetrically centrred to the wheel hub: When attaching springs to torque tube suspension, you have to allow springs to tilt in two planes: You can also attach the springs to the suspension links to increase suspension travel. This technique is especially common on Trophy Trucks: 12. Attaching springs to independent suspension Independent suspension allows for much more flexible spring placement. Generally the closer you attach the spring to the main suspension arm pivot, the higher spring travel you get, but lower suspension force. Examples going from the hardest suspension with low travel to the softest with high travel: You can also attach springs inside the suspension arms: Or horizontally: As with the live axles make sure springs are in the center of the wishbones. Example of good placements: And an example of bad spring placement, which causes excessive friction and suspension binding: 5. Steering Steering is the system which allows our model to change direction. Generally there are two types of steering system used: 1. Skid steering Advantages: 1. Very simple to implement and control with two separate motors for left and right sided wheels. 2. Does not require a dedicated steering motor Disadvantages: 1. Not efficient, since wheels have to skid to steer 2. Power had to be reduced or even reversed in order to steer. 3. Not very accurate 4. Not very effective offroad 2. Classical steering with steerable wheels Advantages: 1. Efficient, with minimum loss of speed 2. Accurate 3. Does not reduce the power of the drive motors 4. Can be used in front, rear or all axles for tight steering radius or crab steering 5. Effective offroad Disadvantages: 1. Requires more complex hub assemblies 2. For best steering accuracy you need a dedicated servo motor. Examples of a simple classical steering system for live axles 1. Parallel steering system for live axles Here both hubs are always parallel. Position of the steering in the front or rear rack has no affect on the steering. Advantages: 1. Very simple and robust 2. Easy to build Disadvantages: 1. No Ackermann steering geometry 2. Steering rack moves inwards as it steers, requiring more space. 2. Ackermann steering system for live axles This system allows the hubs to steer at different rates. The steering arms are offset inside so they form a virtual steering point where at the point where lines meet. Advantages: 1. Better steering performance Disadvantages: 1. More complex assembly 2. Steering rack moves inwards as it steers, requiring more space. 3. Steering system with diagonal linkages This system acts similar as Ackermann steering system by using diagonal steering links. Advantages: 1. Better steering performance 2. Steering rack only has to move in one direction without sideways movements 3. Can be configured to be used in front or the rear of the axle. Disadvantages: 1. More complex assembly 4. Simple steering system for independent suspension 1. Very simple and robust 2. Easy to build 3. Can be even more robust when using double steering racks and links 4. Steering rack only has to move in one direction without sideways movements Disadvantages: 1. No Ackermann steering geometry 5. Ackermann steering system for independent suspension Advantages: 1. Better steering performance 2. Steering rack only has to move in one direction without sideways movements Disadvantages: 1. More complex assembly, less robust. 3. General steering tips 1. When using independent suspension always make sure your links are paralel to the suspension arms, otherwise you may end up with wheels which are not parallel and are causing excessive friction: 2. When using standard portal hubs make sure your steering system is robust enough to deal with the forces generated by wheel driving into obstacles. 3. If possible use servo motors which allow for high steering precision and return to center. They are especially useful at high speed models. 4. Most efficient way to steer the wheels is using the steering racks. 5. Build axles in such way they have positive caster angle, example for direction of travel from right to left. This will self-center your wheels and reduce rolling resistance. 6. Drivelines Drivelines are the responsible for transferring the power from the motors to the wheels. There are various drivelines you can build, here I listed few with their characteristics: Driveline types 1. Permanent 4x4 Advantages: 1. Simple, centralized, low mechanical complexity 2. Wheels are always powered, great offroad performance 3. Light weight Disadvantages: 1. Poor steering radius 2. Tyres have to skid when steering, lowering efficiency of the model 2. 4x4 with open differentials Typical example of this driveline is 42070 Advantages: 1. Differentials allow the wheels to so spin at different rates when steering 2. Very efficient since wheels don't have to skid when steering Disadvantages: 1. If one wheel loses traction, all the power is transfereed to it, poor offroad performance 3. 4x4 with lockable differentials Advantages: 1. Differentials allow the wheels to so spin at different rates when steering 2. Very efficient since wheels don't have to skid when steering 3. All differentials can be locked, so wheels are powered for great offroad performance Disadvantages: 1. Higher mechanical complexity 2. Dedicated motor is required to actuate differential locks, higher weight 4. Axle mounted motors Typical example of this driveline are 9398 and 41999. Advantages: 1. Differentials allow the wheels to so spin at different rates when steering 2. Very efficient since wheels don't have to skid when steering 3. If one wheel gets off the ground the second axle can still pull/push the model. Disadvantages: 1. Higher mechanical complexity 2. Usually the rear axle motor is more loaded than the front, especially when climbing uphill, the motors can't "help" each other. 3. Worse offroad performance than permanent 4x4 5. H drive: This is my favourite driveline due to the following reasons: Advantages: 1. Motors allow the wheels to so spin at different rates when steering 2. Model can skid steer 3. Very efficient since wheels don't have to skid when steering normally 4. Having 2 drivelines allows you to carry more torque to the wheels 5. Redundancy, even if one drive fails the model can still move 6. Wheels are always powered, great offroad performance Disadvantages: 1. Higher mechanical complexity 2. Slightly higher weight 6. Wheel motor drive Each motor powers a wheel independently. Advantages: 1. Motors allow the wheels to so spin at different rates when steering 2. Model can skid steer 3. Very efficient since wheels don't have to skid when steering normally 4. Redundancy, even if one or more motors fails the model can still move 6. Lower mechanical complexity Disadvantages: 1. Motors can't "help" each other 2. Higher weight due to a higher motor count Transferring power axially When transferring power via axles, you can reduce the flex by using connectors instead of simple "bare" axle: Use axles with stops to prevent them from sliding out of gears: Where possible always brace tooth gears from both sides: Transferring power at an angle Where pairs of U joints are used, make sure to align them to eliminate vibrations: Brick built CV joint which can transfer high torque at over 30 degrees angle Brick built cardan joint which can transfer extremely high torque up to 15 degrees angle Brick built flexible drive which can transfer medium high torque, extract and retract, suitable for low angles Transferring power perpendicularly The following perpendicular gearboxes are the best suitable for transferring high torque Avoid knob and worm gears, because they waste energy Gearboxes In my models I generally use the following gearboxes: 1:3 differential gearbox Advantages: 1. Very high gear ratio between low and high gear, 1:3 2. Capable of transferring high torque 3. Very efficient since only 2 gears are used at any time Disadvantages: 1. Takes a lot of space 2. This gearbox requires a good housing to brace the gears properly Compact two speed gearbox Advantages: 1. High gear ratio between low and high gear, 1:2,77 2. Capable of transferring high torque 3. Very efficient since only 2 gears are used at any time 4. Very compact design Disadvantages: 1. Requires two of the rare 20 tooth clutch gears 2. More complex shifter assembly. Diagonal gearbox Advantages: 1. High number of gears 2. High gear ratio possible, over 4:1 2. Capable of transferring high torque 3. Very efficient since only 2 gears are used at any time Disadvantages: 1. Takes a lot of space 2. Input and output axles are not parallel. 3. A complex shifting assembly is required for sequential operation. Driveline effect on suspension Transferring torque on the wheels can affect the suspension, especially when live axles are used. The following photo shows how the torque causes one side of the axle to push down and the other to lift up: In order to minimize this effect I suggest the following: 1. Make sure to have most if not all the downgearing inside the axles, so you do not need high torque going to the axles. 2. Make sure your models have a low center of gravity 3. You can eliminate this effect by using two counte rotating axles which cancel each other's torque, example below: 7. Motors and control Following are the most common types of motors used for Lego models. You can find more info here: http://www.philohome.com/motors/motorcomp.htm My personal favourites are L and RC motors due to the balanced output speed to torque ration and great mounting options. 1. PF-M Advantages: 1. High speed output 2. Smallest available motor 3. Cheap and available Disadvantages: 1. Low torque 2. Poor mounting options 2. PF-L Advantages: 1. High speed output 2. High torque 3. Cheap and available 4. Great mounting options Disadvantages: 1. Odd shape 3. PF-XL Advantages: 1. Very high torque 3. Cheap and available 4. Good mounting options Disadvantages: 1. Slow speed output 2. Large form factor 4. PF-Servo Advantages: 1. Very high torque 2. Very precise output with 15 positions 3. Good mounting options Disadvantages: 1. Slow speed output 2. Output axle can move a max of 180 degrees 3. Large form factor 4. Hard to find 5. 9V-RC motor Advantages: 1. Most oowerful Lego motor 2. Very high speed output 3. Good mounting options 4. Two output axles with different gearing ratios 5. Drive axles can pass through the motor Disadvantages: 1. Low output torque 2. Low efficiency 3. Power hungry 4. Odd form factor 5. Hard to find and expensive Power options 1. PF - AA battery box Advantages: 1. High capacity 2. Good mounting options 3. Works with rechargeable batteries, but with lower performance 4. Cheap and easy to find Disadvantages: 1. 750mA current limit - not enough to fully power RC motor 2. Heavy 3. Has to be removed and opened to replace batteries 4. Wasteful 5. Odd form factor 2. PF - LiPo battery box Advantages: 1. Small form factor 2. Light weight 3. Easy to recharge Disadvantages: 1. 750mA current limit - not enough to fully power RC motor 2. Low capacity 3. Studded design 4. Expensive and hard to find 3. RC control unit Advantages: 1. No current limit - can power 2RC motors at once 2. 3 Power levels 3. Has integrated steering output with 7 positions 4. Good mounting options 5. Easy battery replacement 6. Radio based control Disadvantages: 1. Poor quality, prone to breaking 2. Limited angle (45 degrees) and torque from the steering output 3. Has to be removed and opened to replace batteries 4. Very large form factor 5. Expensive and hard to find 6. Heavy 7. Required dedicated antennas and remote Control options 1. PF receiver and controller Advantages: 1. Receiver is easy to integrate into the model 2. Controllers have physical feedback 3. Cheap and easy to find Disadvantages: 1. IR based, low range, useless outside 2. Lack of PWM motor control, unless using train controller which is awkward to use 3. Odd form factor for use with steering 2. RC control unit See above 3. Third party options such as BuWizz and Sbrick Advantages: 1. Smaller form factors, easy to integrate into model 2. More outputs than PF system 3. Smooth control of motors 4. High range thanks to Bluetooth control 5. Higher power available with BuWizz 6. Customizable profiles Disadvantages: 1. Smart device is required 2. No physical feedback 3. Sbrick is limited by PF battery box 4. Price 8. Chassis Chasis is the backbone of your model which olds everything together. For chassis I suggest you to use the following components in order to make it strong and robust enough to deal with the stresses involved when crawling or driving at high speed: Some flex in the chassis might be a good thing to improve offroad capability, but only if id does not affect the driveline and cause friction on the drive axles. Remeember to use diagonal support, since triangles are the strongest shapes. You can also use panels and motors as structural support. Interlocking your chassis will keep it from slipping apart. For good examples of chassis designs I suggest you check the instructions for 9398 and 42083.
  20. The origins of the idea: The core of this model consists of three rings which can independently rotate around three perpendicular axes. These pivoted rings are called gimbals. Gimbals have been used in a wide variety of engineering applications since ancient times till modern days. Gimbal suspension is used to provide stability to objects inside unstable environment, e.g. compasses on ships and gyroscopes on planes. Furthermore, the simplicity and effectiveness of gimbals often attracted artists' attention. In science fiction and fantasy, gimbals have been used to represent complex contraptions capable of creating new physical effects and even manipulating the very fabric of reality. Some of the examples include the machine from the 1997 movie Contact, the gravity drive from the movie Event Horizon, mass relays from the video game series Mass Effect and even the Time-Turner from the movie Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. LEGO implementation: The idea of this model is to set gimbals in motion. Complex transmission allows each of the three motors to independently operate one of the three rings. Therefore the contraption is very easy to control. The rings and the frame are perfectly rigid and secure. The design of the model is intentionally minimalistic so that it could be used as a part of larger models. Video demonstration: Simple version: There is also a simplified version of the model with only two rotating rings and one motor. It may be also actuated by hand. Video demonstration and speed test of this version: Afterword: If you like this idea, please support my project on LEGO Ideas and share it with your friends! Thank you for your attention!
  21. This MOC came about from my wanting of a super compact all-in-one Lego compressor, and after trying many different auto valve designs (and about a week of building), this is what I came up with: Video: Features: Air tank Automatic pressure switch M motor and 6L mini pump compressor Very compact 15 x 11 x 7 stud size Easy removal of battery box Pneumatic tube lengths: 1x 3L (2.4cm) 2x 10L (8cm) 1x 14L (11.2cm) All the pneumatic tube lengths listed above (and most of the other parts) are available in 8110-1 Unimog U400. Instructions are available on Rebrickable. The compressor uses a single 6L mini pneumatic pump, but can easily be modified for two pumps. The automatic cut-off pressure can easily be adjusted by changing the strength of the rubber bands attached to the pneumatic cylinder.
  22. Commander Wolf

    [MOC] Miscellaneous Train Projects

    Finally getting around to posting some of these... I've been doing a bunch of small projects this year that I don't feel warranty their own thread, so this thread is going to be a home for said small projects. PRR MP54 Some years ago I built a set of PRR P54 coaches to go with my PRR T1. At the time I thought a fun future project would be to convert the cars to MP54 spec - the EMU version of the same car. Well, the future is now! Over the past few years I've been trying to build trains using all of various the LEGO motors, and the PF train motor was still on my hit list. I don't like the PF train motor that much because it doesn't have any low-speed torque, and the wheel spacing hasn't been correct for anything I've made so far. Recently I remembered about the MP54, and I thought it would be the perfect application - fast and doesn't need a lot of torque. Here is one of the original P54s as built: And here is the MP54 conversion: Of course the main difference is that there is a battery box, receiver, and motor in the MP54, but I've also updated the original model over the years, most noticeably by slowly collecting all the frames and glass. Other minor changes include the addition of headlights and a more vanilla bogie design to match the PF motor frames. Of course you want to see it go: I was really entertained by how fast it goes! Usually I prefer gearing down such that you get more torque and less speed, but watching this zip along is a fun change of pace. The pulling power isn't actually all that bad either, but as expected, you need to be going pretty fast before the PF train motor is generating any torque. One more interesting thing is that I'm actually using BBB wheels on the PF motor instead of the usual tyred wheels. I originally tried with the official wheels, but I due to the low torque I felt like it was really bogging down in the corners, so I tried the BBBs. This is a much smoother configuration, and it doesn't feel like I'm losing all that much grip. It can definitely pull at least the other two P54s and maybe another car or two. Okay, more to come soon. Hopefully.
  23. Hey builders! Recently I made a LEGO power functions laser (topic can be found here), and it got me thinking... what els can I build? That's how I came to the idea of making a LEGO electromagnet! Making it was actually a whole lot easier than making the LEGO laser. The LEGO laser required a 9 volt to 5 volt converter and reversed -polarity protection. The electromagnet was already made for 9 volt and it does not care about polarity. I just got the motor out and unhooked the 2 wires, then connected those 2 wires to the electromagnet and... it worked! I'm amazed by the strength of this small thing, under good conditions (unpainted, flat metal) it can lift up to 6 kilo's! I have no specific idea of how to use it in MOC but I'm sure I'll think of a good application for it. All suggestions are welcome by the way Tell me what you think ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ BUILDING LOG weight: 78 gramscapacity: 6 kilo+ To make one yourself you need: PARTS: - a 9 volt electromagnet (ebay is a good source, I bought mine for 5.46$). - some glue (I used hot glue) - soldering tin & shrink tube TOOLS: - flathead screwdriver or prying tool - soldering iron -lighter (for shrink tube) First you need to open up the PF XL motor housing, this is quite hard. I found the best way is to squeeze it just a bit in a vice so the outer shell becomes oval and you can stick a small thin screwdriver in the gap to open it(mind the position in the vice!). This is what you will find on the inside: Disconnect the 2 wires attached to the motor, put the top half of the casing is a vice and dremel out the center rougly to the size of you electromagnet: Then make everything perfectly round with a small file untill the electromagnet fit's snug in the housing: After pressing it in the housing, get 2 lego beams and attach them to the 2 forward facing holes. this way you can make the magnet perfectly flush when mounted in a MOC: Then seal the electromagnet firmly in place using glue (I used hot glue). Next you solder the 2 wires coming from your electromagnet to the 2 wires that were attached to the motor (the inner 2 strands of the 4 strand LEGO wire, polarity does not matter). Make sure you use shrink tube to isolate both wires! Then glue the motor plate (holding the LEGO wire) in place and test the magnet! If it works close it up and you're done!! I hope you enjoined this build log, if you have any questions just let me know!
  24. I started working on this model many weeks ago in Lego Digital Designer first. The whole concept started with the quarter circles from BWE, which are able to perfectly accomodate the small rotors. I was heavily inspired by the (movie) Avatar's rendition of helicopters. After a lot of tinkering in LDD, it was time to start building in real life: It was here I discovered I made a big mistake. The control stick located in the cab used to tilt the rotors was reversed! I had to go back to the drawing board and correct the control mechanism. Few days, fixes and improvements later, this is what the final model looks like: I wanted the colors to randomly switch from yellow to make it look more eye-striking. Where possible I used black 2L pins instead of the blue ones. As stated in the topic name, this is a motorized model, powered by the small LiPo battery box which is hidden in the tail, next to a single M motor: The single M motor powers a total of 3 functions: - Drive rotors (always engaged, spinning in one direction only) - Opening cargo doors and rear ramp (powered by a gearbox) - Working winch (powered by a gearbox) You can see the driveline of all the motorized functions here: The red mechanism at closest to the M motor makes sure rotors are spinning in one direction only, irrelevant of which direction M motor spins. This way changing direction of the gearbox does not change in which direction rotors spin. Gearboy in front switches between openining doors+ramp and a winch. The doors and ramp are actuated by a single actuator located right behind the cockpit: The rear of the cargo doors is connected to the ramp via bewel gears, so both open at once: I also bult a small container which can be easily lifted by the motorized winch: The container can easily fit inside the cargo bay area: You can see the finished model's video below:
  25. Unfinished_Projects

    [MOC] Powered Boxcar (Power Functions)

    I created this boxcar to push my unpowered locomotives. It has all necessary Power Functions equipment with 2 train motors. It allows me to create locomotives without having to incorporate power. The IR receiver is mounted sideways because I run my trains on a wall mounted track about close to the ceiling (see picture). In the future I hope to add a rechargeable battery and power pickups (for a hybrid 9v/Power Functions system). Thanks for looking! Unfinished_Projects Designed using Stud.io 2.0 and rendered with POV-RAY