GeorgeCrecy

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  1. GeorgeCrecy

    Need Help Replicating Historic Engine System

    Hey there Tommy, Looking very nice indeed! Will be interesting to see what you intend for the connection between the bottom and cylinders. Again, I am really appreciating your time on the project.
  2. GeorgeCrecy

    Need Help Replicating Historic Engine System

    Hey there Tommy, Those are looking excellent! I might have some concern regarding their structural integrity under pressure, but moreso about the lack of holes for piping in the air, though I saw you mention this was a rough draft. I've been trying to fiddle with more brick instead of plate-built ones for both of those reasons. And taking a peek at the cross section image above I provided, it might be difficult to proceed if we don't do something more brick built. But you should continue with what you have in mind and we will see where it goes!
  3. GeorgeCrecy

    Need Help Replicating Historic Engine System

    Hey there Tommy, I am glad you have agreed to take this on with me! I greatly appreciate your help. I will be over with college classes next week, so I can certainly relate. But to answer you, we do want to avoid making the engines as a whole operating with an uneven width of bricks, as that will make everything else off. So if you orient your building with the LP cylinders being 10 bricks wide for the outside diameter, that would be ideal for everything else we would attempt to do. My guess would be that the other cylinder dimensions would be 8 for the IP and 6 for the IP. Also, the overall dimensions starting with the baseplate will be 22 in width, and give or take very close to 72 in length, and no more than 48 in height.
  4. GeorgeCrecy

    Need Help Replicating Historic Engine System

    To continue the conversation perhaps with the danger of double posting, an idea to keep the air pressure in the cylinders comes from a comparatively simple possibility shown below: The piston shaft (grey) with the technic reinforcement goes through the 4x4 round plate with a hollow center (yellow), that provides a rather seamless portal for the piston to go through without allowing air back down in the traveling. The 4x4 square plate allows other plates - or more likely tiles - to be placed inside the cylinder again without allowing gaps for air. I am sure this has been done before or is a very elementary a concept, so forgive me if this seems like preaching to a very knowledgeable choir. I am still on the learning end, especially applying engineering principles to LEGO. Secondly, I found an excellent cross-section of a steam engine that can be indispensable for our own designing of the cylinders to be seen here: Let me know what you think. And one last thing to showcase, an attempt on the thrust block:
  5. GeorgeCrecy

    Need Help Replicating Historic Engine System

    Hey Tommy, Now what would be the fun of the project without a little challenge, eh? As for the scaling, the ship as a whole is generally to the scale of the minifigs, and I would beware the danger of underestimating the sheer enormity of these beasties, they were each over three stories tall! But I would concede to dropping to something closer to 8 studs wide on the LPs, as the dimensions I gave are educated - but still rough - estimates. I did want to reiterate that this wouldn't be working off vacuum, was just using the video as an example of the mechanical possibilities. It would be using air power, which will be much quieter, and again you might be surprised at how powerful this setup can be if under load, though I don't have an exigent example to showcase. Ultimately, let us cross that bridge when we get to it. We can probably use an electric motor to help power the turning engine towards the rear that was the beginning impetus. We can also make use of some hidden gearboxes in the thrust blocks to help get more torque if need be. Lastly, this was an awesome engine with a lot of thought put into the design, including the angles at which the pistons rested on the crankshaft and the including of an additional LP cylinder to reduce vibrations in combination with the Piston angling. On another note, I doubt there will be too much problem with ducting air as the usual tubing can be hidden in brick-made larger tubes that better match the scale, or perhaps use those large tubes introduced in the Mission to Mars line. I'm liking the discussion, thanks for the help so far, let's keep it up!
  6. GeorgeCrecy

    Need Help Replicating Historic Engine System

    Hey there Tommy, Thanks for getting back to me! I do hold out hope that this project is possible because of things like this by mechanicsnut on youtube, see here: I do realize that the ubiquitous use of vacuum power would be a much different beast than pneumatic power, but I am hoping that the design can be very similar. On another note, I might question the scale you are thinking on, though I didn't give the dimensions necessary for some of your calculations, so that is my fault. So let me fix that. Some of the dimensions we are working with are (including the base) about 22 studs wide, 72 studs long, and (give or take) 48 studs tall by my estimations using Ldraw's dimensions report, which measures height in the SNOT style. So with that in mind, the cylinders would be 10 studs wide in the largest cylinders, which is significantly more room than your original estimates. Secondly, to help with airtightness, I intend that while the outer shell is rounded, the inside should be squared off rather than be circular to aid in the ease of design. With all this in mind, I think we have some decent chances. What do you think?
  7. Dear fellow LEGO enthusiasts, I am in dire need of some help from you folks who are definitely more knowledgeable than I. In this case, I am needing help with the replication of the RMS Titanic's Reciprocating Engines and Turbine. I am in the midst at the moment of working on the project below, though I have not updated it in a great while due to university work. See this link here for the project thread. But this is a minifig scale project, with every door, every window accounted for. This means that in regards to the engines, I am also seeking to make them at least somewhat true to scale and able to work as intended. Obviously this is a big job of some top notch Edwardian-era engineering, but I am hoping that there might be some out there not as technically-challenged (pun totally intended) as I am, willing to help me get this part of the project off the ground. Some of the features I I am looking for include a fully air-powered system, where the air supply would come from tanks hidden in the mock-boilers, that are then funneled at somewhat high pressure to the Triple Recip. Engines, which means that the pressure would go down as it goes through each cylinder (HP, IP, then two LPs). The leftover air at a much lower pressure then goes to a junction that can either go to the Parson's Turbine at what was historically 4 psi, or can go directly to the condensers. With the latter I intend just to make the outside of it and hide inside some custom compressors like this. That would then return to the original air supply. With this I am hoping that I will have a self-supplying system with ideally no more than 5% leakage, or enough compressors that leaks are compensated for. WIth the Parson's Turbine, that can be an accurate shell with whatever is needed inside to include a working turbine, and probably with an gearbox and ascending set of gear ratios to give it the necessary torque. These engines and turbine are meant to actually turn the propellers, perhaps even in water! Some other features would include a replica of the Brown-type reversing engine on the side of each of the Recip engines, making it so that the Stevenson-type eccentrics can change the direction of rotation. Considering the scale, the reversing engine doesn't technically have to be much more than a slightly-hidden piston that does the required job, but any more realism doesn't hurt. If something like this is possible, please let me know. I am really wanting to continue with this project, and this is a central part of it. But without the pieces in front of me instead of on a computer screen, what little I know of engineering definitely doesn't help without that tactile interaction. Thanks for your time, and I look forward to your replies! If it is possible, then I can follow up with the intended dimensions. Here are some references for any that wants some: View of turbine and condensers through wall from main engines rotor shaft model of port-side recip. engine overall basic view path of the steam of original, pressurized air for mine
  8. GeorgeCrecy

    The Royal Minifig Ship Titanic

    Hey Legoboy, I do thank you for the telemotor design, its really nice! I hope you don't mind my using a slightly different version in my model? Also, I do appreciate your help with the lifeboats. I have seen those done by others too, however it is hard to copy their brilliance without close inspection lacking in their photos. Something I am finding in using digital building is that it is vastly harder to build than in real life. And not to cue the "well duh" moment, I am saying so because the lack of continuous updates is because there are various mistakes that are harder to catch than in real life (i.e. parts overlapping), the loading time to move around and to place/delete parts is getting to be a few seconds each time due to the size of the model, also slowing the process. I have tried separating decks and working on them as separate files rather than separate custom sections - or multipart as it is known as in LDraw - but I found that created more problems than solved them. Plus, there are certain things that must be done in real life. For instance, I am trying to make working models of the reciprocating engines based on the work of on Youtube, and it is only tripping me up due to the lack of my not having the model in front of me and feeling the torque of the Technic parts. So I fervently thank everyone again for their patience.
  9. GeorgeCrecy

    The Royal Minifig Ship Titanic

    Hey Guys, Take a look at the page again, as it has been slightly updated on the Forecastle and Poop Deck, not to mention the addition of the large cranes, which I had problems with before and are finally implemented in Lego! But now we have many of the little bits and pieces on there, like the mooring bitts, cranes, anchor chain channel, skylights, the aft docking bridge, etc. Lots of stuff and only so much that can be seen in the pictures I try to show. I also need your guys' help. I am caught up with two things: the telemotor and lifeboats. If anyone could help with a design, I would appreciate it. Here are some pictures: Telemotor: I am aiming for this to have a base of 2x2, and not be higher than four or five bricks, something in that range. I was thinking to use one of the Technic wheels for the major part, but I can't find anything of the right size with a hole through the side to attach it to the base, and I haven't been too successful with anything brick-built. Lifeboats: There were several sizes that the lifeboats came in, from the standard sixteen, to the two collapsibles atop the Officer's Quarters, to the two hanging on either side of the Bridge. I think I am aiming for 26 bricks long on the collapsibles, perhaps 28 long on the regular ones, and only 18 or 20 on the smaller ones, and a width between 8 and 10. So if anyone can help with the design of these, I would appreciate it a lot! I am also aiming for these to be able to be sat in and used by the minifigs. Thanks again guys, I look forward to your ideas and suggestions.
  10. GeorgeCrecy

    The Royal Minifig Ship Titanic

    Hey Guys, here are some answers to your questions and comments: I like how you put my name in quotes. That was neat... and thanks. Well Wedge, that was part of my little plan was that it be sinkable, maybe to the point of having a section that could be removed or opened electrically. Thanks for the welcome and the luck, I will probably need it. In terms of building it completely, besides being incredibly mad in the first place, it would take a lot of time and money, both of which as a college student I don't have a lot of. Maybe at some time after I have won a few lotteries and have retired I will actually do this in real life, as great as that would be! Its so bad that I literally dream at night that I am shrunk down and am going through the ship. Hmm. Thanks PsyKater, its always nice to be given that chance that so few others are given, at least not at first! In terms of how many parts, that is a bit of a stumbler. Fortunately, there are various reports that I can generate and reference, so the person that can guess the closest to the TOTAL number of parts as of right now will get a cookie baked by yours truly. Does require for you to give me your address, birthday and social security number so you can collect your winnings.... But really, let me give you some idea of how many parts are in this. The Boat Deck (top deck) has 23863 pieces to it, the roof adding another 5817 pieces to that. The Promenade Deck (next down) with a lot less open space has 22271 pieces. This doesn't include what little of the other decks I have done, let alone those yet started. I might not reach over two-hundred thousand like with the Yamamoto, but I think I can manage a cool second place in terms of parts. I hope it will look as good as you think, as right now I have little hope with successfully making the curvature of the hull correctly. I probably won't be putting furniture in every room, but I might be tempted to do so in some of the important rooms. I also hope that this can be finished one of these days. I've been working on it for long enough (five years, two restarts). Hey Tedbeard, I also enjoyed the ship, though not from personally seeing it. However, there were a few things that annoyed me enough for me to say that it is based on the Titanic, and not the actual ship. Much of the Boat Deck, Forecastle, etc. are incorrectly made out, which is not a put down on Mr. Fowler's work, its just a tad bit of OCD-ness on my part that its... you know... not really it. Thanks LegoDr! Well, hopefully that answers some of your questions, and it's neat that my views jumped from around 700 to over 1000 in so little time, so thanks again to everyone and please remember to keep looking for updates on the work. I am going to make an effort to make sure that I get more out. Cheers!
  11. GeorgeCrecy

    The Royal Minifig Ship Titanic

    Hey Guys, I would humbly suggest taking a look at a project I have been working on for way too long. This is a full minifig scale RMS Titanic, the dimensions being over 31 feet long, over three and a half feet wide, and eventually over seven feet tall including masts and funnel height. Without including masts, the model would be almost five feet tall. My ultimate goal is to have each room, door, porthole, stairs, etc. included. I am not too focused on incredible detail, though many of the smaller things do find their way into it. Also, each deck will be able to be lifted off to see inside, though there won't be much in the way of interiors. Check it out at http://mocpages.com/moc.php/289808. I began this a long time ago after watching some videos on youtube of people trying to make a Lego Titanic, and I decided to try and do a better job of what was commonly done. They were usually too small, and were obviously exhausting a person's collection with the variety of colors that showed up. I wanted something as full scale as possible. I also have dreams that if I was ever to make this in real life, that it would include lighting along the passages, working elevators, smoke machines under the first three funnels (as last was a dummy and extra vent), the reciprocating and electric engines working and turning the props, maybe even the rudder working too. Current order of activity as of 12/20/15: B Deck: Finish rework of walls. C Deck: Work on it, finish the wall outline, etc. D Deck: get to it! E Deck: get to it! F Deck: get to it! Orlop Top (G): get to it! Orlop Bottom (H): get to it! Bilge and Keel: yes, getting to it! The curve of the hull is going to be a bugger to do, especially so considering that each deck is done separately. The brick count would be too much for my computer to handle if this was all in one model. I love MLCad for this, as I get to have so much versatility in model making, not to mention a lack of a part limit like in LDD. Thanks and remember to like!