Ralph_S

Eurobricks Counts
  • Content Count

    1418
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Ralph_S

  1. Ralph_S

    How much did you spend on Lego in 2011?

    It's not every day you see a model of that size. That's one heck of a castle! I have participated in building large layouts of several square meters, but they were collaborative projects. I obviously understand that not having models on-line doesn't mean you don't have them. I do enjoy sharing mine, although I too don't really enjoy photography. Thanks for the comments on my models. I realise that some people collect the stuff, but never quite understood got the attraction of doing that. From a very young age, any set that I'd get would be together for at most a couple of days before the bits were used to make something myself. The only sealed boxes I have sitting around are about a dozen -mostly 2011's acquisitions- that I haven't gotten around to parting out yet. I don't know whether builders are a minority among AFOLs, but I do have the impression that we're the minority on Eurobricks. Cheers, Ralph
  2. Ralph_S

    How much did you spend on Lego in 2011?

    OK, so what do you do with your LEGO? That makes sense. Obviously that's a far bigger project than the sort of things I undertake. I generally don't work on projects that take longer than a few weeks at most. Cheers, Ralph
  3. Ralph_S

    How much did you spend on Lego in 2011?

    I agree. I generally only buy parts or sets with parts that I intend to use in my own models. Unlike some people I know, who tell themselves they'll use the parts eventually but don't seem to build much of anything, I actually do use them. I could easily spend more on LEGO if I wanted to, but don't have any use for more. Cheers, Ralph
  4. 'New' on bricklink means that they haven't been used. What that often means is that the seller has bought sets that they come in and has parted them out. I'm not aware of LEGO selling them to people directly, but they may. There was a thread about buying directly from LEGO through a service called LEGO Direct. http://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=46844 I'm not sure whether that info is still current, though, and whether it is cheaper. At least the part is still in production! Cheers, Ralph
  5. Ralph_S

    Where do Rare/HTF Parts come from?

    I don't collect 'HTF' parts for the sake of having them, I use them in MOCs. It's not unusual for me to be thinking about building something, figuring out what parts to use for some element of it, to then come to the conclusion that the part in question in the colour I want has never been produced for a set. If I only need a few and they're not overly expensive on BL I'll probably buy them. There also are some parts that I'm always looking for: trans clear jumper plates for instance. Those tend to be expensive, but whenever I'm buying something from a seller, I always check whether they perhaps have a few. Lots of small orders combined makes big quantities. Sometimes you get lucky. Legoland Windsor at one point bought a whole load of pearlescent grey parts because they intended to build several Boeing 747s in Virgin Atlantic colours. The project never happened and they sold off a fair bit of the stuff. It was mixed in with other bits in rummage boxes in one of the stores in the park a few years ago and I picked up quite a lot of it. They are parts not even listed on bricklink. Cheers, Ralph
  6. Ralph_S

    How much did you spend on Lego in 2011?

    I'm a bit shocked by some of the amounts. I thought I spent a lot on LEGO. I spent roughly 1300 Euros (excluding the air fare for going to Brickfair in the US and the Great Western LEGO show, which is a fairly typical amount for the last few years. Most of the LEGO I buy goes into MOCs and I'm pretty sure I build more than most people. This makes me wonder what those of you who spend close to $10000 on it do with all of it (other than trading)? Cheers, Ralph
  7. I see sets as parts packs first and foremost. I don't even build most of the sets I buy and most that I do build don't stay together for very long. There are a few exceptions. I still have the Lunar Lander (from 2003), the Sopwith Camel and Red Baron models. They are right up my alley, and I did buy multiple copies so that I could build one and use the rest of the parts for MOCs. I also used to have the Wright Flyer that I kept in one piece for several years, but took it apart about two years ago when I simply couldn't resist using the parts for one of my own models any more. At the moment I also still have the Grand Carousel in one piece. I generally don't get nearly as much enjoyment out of building from instructions and looking at the built up set than I do from building my own stuff and having my own models on a shelf. Cheers, Ralph
  8. Ralph_S

    Where do Rare/HTF Parts come from?

    The HTF parts are typically items produced for LEGOLand parks. Their models are built with the same shape of parts, but they can get them in unusual colours. I usually get mine through bricklink. I can only give you my own view on instructions or files of MOCs, as somebody who gets asked for them frequently and who almost always gives 'no' as a reply. I'm not reluctant to share instructions or files. I usually don't have any, because I normally don't make instructions. I obviously don't need them myself, and making instructions is an awful lot of work and is not something I enjoy doing. I'd rather spend the time that I have for my hobby on building new stuff. I suspect it is not different for many other builders that you might encounter. Cheers, Ralph
  9. Ralph_S

    9v Planes

    No. Think about it. a 1/43 scale car model doesn't weight 50 lbs, does it? Mass scales with the scale to the power 3. If the aircraft model were a perfect scale model and were to have the same density as the real one (were made out of materials similarly heavy per volume as the real thing) it would weigh 158,000/48^3=1.4 lbs. Since LEGO doesn't have the same properties as aluminium or titanium or whatever a B-2 is made of, if you were to want to build an aircraft model that big, with a 4 ft. wingspan it would probably need fairly thick skin and a lot of internal bracing and would end up heavier than that. Perhaps as much as 20 lbs. I have built large aircraft models and they tend to weigh about that much. The only way I can see a flying LEGO aircraft being feasible is with a lot of specialised parts. I don't think it's possible to build and to use a LEGO motor and propeller to provide enough thrust to propel it through the air at a high enough speed. Cheers, Ralph
  10. Ralph_S

    Double Decker Coach

    Nice to see you build MOCs Rog. It's where the action is I like the look of it. The wheels look a bit small compared to the bulk of the vehicle, but this way it does stay very close to the aesthetic of LEGO's own city range. Cheers, Ralph
  11. Ralph_S

    What LEGO mold are you?

    This is a weird topic indeed. I'm a finger hinge. Slim, very useful and a bit oldschool Cheers, Ralph
  12. It's not nonsense at all. If you buy a product from a company, you pay for part of the advertising and yes, you also pay for time people at that company spend on the loo and their loo paper too. If you want to look at this thing as a way of making money, of course you have to factor in the time spent on the whole process. Cheers, Ralph
  13. V-A-2A As usual, I have no idea where to put this. Model Team? Creator? City? Who knows? I built this model for an article for LEGO's Master Builder Academy Issue 4. By now it has been out for a while, so I can finally publish my pictures. For years the Dutch Police used the classic Bo-105, but by the turn of the century those were getting a bit long in the tooth. In 2001, eight MD902 Explorers were ordered as replacements, but MD helicopters had difficulties meeting the requirements on time. With all the stipulated equipment, the helicopters were overweight and had to be recertified, which took longer than intended. The contract was cancelled in 2005 and six EC135s and two AW139s were bought instead and all delivered in 2009. They are based at Schiphol Amsterdam airport and at two other fields (Teuge and Volkel). Dutch Police EC135 (1) by Mad physicist, on Flickr The EC135 has been a great success for Eurocopter, with helicopters having been sold for Police and Air Ambulance roles all over the world. Dutch Police EC135 (3) by Mad physicist, on Flickr The first version of the helicopter had a fenestron/ fantail similar to the design I used on my HH-65 Dolphin. However, I remembered that I had a few propellers lying in my drawer of 'parts that don't fit in any meaningful other category' and I figured that it would fit. It doesn't turn very well, but looks far better. Dutch Police EC135 (5) by Mad physicist, on Flickr The big challenge when building this helicopter was the cockpit section, with the glass nose and doors. The EC135s have an extensive equipment fit for the law-enforcement role, with a cockpit interior that is compatible with night-vision goggles, weather radar, a PA system, cable-cutters, a dedicated workstation for an observer -including a 20 inch computer monitor, an IR turret, night-sun searchlight and a real-time video down-link facility to share images with police on the ground. Dutch Police EC135 (4) by Mad physicist, on Flickr I hope the members of Eurobricks like it and would like to wish you all a happy 2012. Cheers, Ralph
  14. Ralph_S

    Dutch Police Eurocopter EC135 helicopter

    Thanks everyone. Obviously the larger scale helps with the details and the interior. I couldn't have done this in minifig scale. Cheers, Ralph
  15. Ralph_S

    Photos on Eurobricks

    On the other hand, it is a bit presumptuous to assume that people are going to take the time to see all the details, which means you're doing them a favour by just showing a nice overview. Cheers, Ralph
  16. Ralph_S

    Dutch Police Eurocopter EC135 helicopter

    Thanks guys. When I was asked to write something for the magazine, they specifically asked for non-military models. Most of my helicopters are military, however, and I felt that the two non-military models I had didn't really show what's possible. I spent a long time thinking about what I was going to build. When I finally decided to build this, I wasn't at all sure whether I was going to be able to pull it off. Many of my builds go off without a hitch. I start building and pretty much go from start to finish in one go, without having to go back and make changes to the bits that I've already built. This wasn't one of those. The nose cam together quite quickly, but the aft part of the fuselage underwent a few rebuilds. It's hardly minifig scale. In fact, it's about twice as large as I would consider appropriate for minifigs. I'm not quite sure whether LEGO Town is explicitly for minifig scale stuff though, but I'm pretty sure that the participants in the town forum are most likely to appreciate the model. Cheers, Ralph
  17. I built lots of new stuff, had some of my things blogged on TBB, had models in Brickjournal, and had more than a million views on flickr, but the same is true for 2010 I think the LEGO-related highpoint of my year was attending Brickfair in the DC area. I've been to a lot of events in the UK and a few in the Netherlands in the past, but this was my first event in the USA. I finally met a lot of people whom I'd more-or-less known on-line in real life, got to see great models, met fantastic new people, bought ridiculously discounted LEGO and to top it all off won an award. Next year I'll be going to AFOLCon (in the UK), the Great Western LEGO show (UK) and back for Brickfair 2012. I'm already looking forward to it. Cheers, Ralph
  18. Ralph_S

    Photos on Eurobricks

    There are so many MOCs out there that I give most only a cursory glance. Waiting for more than a dozen or so pictures to load in a discussion board is tedious, certainly if the model in question isn't all that interesting. If the first few pictures aren't interesting, I often can't be bothered to wait and scroll down. I click away and am unlikely to ever look at the rest or leave a comment. If there are only a few, however, I will probably see all of them and may write something, even if the MOC isn't everything I think it could be. So, I prefer a few pictures in the thread and a link to the rest. If I'm interested, I will go to flickr or MOCpages or wherever the rest are hosted. That's how I do it too. I chose a few nice pictures that give a general view and they link to flickr. Cheers, Ralph
  19. Ralph_S

    AFOLCON & The LEGOShow

    I will very likely be coming over to the UK for AFOLCON. I couldn't make it last time, but things look better this year. The guy who built St. Pancras (Warren Elsmore, the organiser of the show) has a van. I've attended numerous shows in the UK whilst living in the Netherlands traveling by plane. This summer I also took models to the US. The models go into my suitcase as check-in luggage on the aircraft. The way I keep them more-or-less in one piece is by packing them into a cardboard box lined with bubble wrap and with lots of plastic bags packed between them to keep them from moving about. The box gets tucked inside my hard-shelled suitcase and wedged in there such that it doesn't move about either. That's key: you ought to keep the models from moving around and banging into each other. They usually sustain some damage, but nothing I couldn't repair on the spot. I will probably be socialising in the evenings. I've been a member of Brickish for years, so I know a fair few people in the British AFOL scene, and expect to see quite a few friends at the show. Cheers, Ralph
  20. Ralph_S

    Tired of licensed sets

    I think you have to keep in mind that LEGO is selling most of these sets to kids. Lots of little boys will want a fire engine, so LEGO constantly brings out fire engines. The same goes for the Star Wars sets. Kids might be interested in Clone Wars or whatever, but if they've seen the original trilogy, they'll definitely want a Millenium Falcon, so LEGO constantly brings out fire engines. It's not rocket science. Cheers, Ralph
  21. Ralph_S

    MOCs: Police cars

    Thanks for that. I don't think I've ever seen one of those before. The ones based on the Ute are atrociously ugly. I'm not sure I'd go there. The ones based on the Holden Crewman are a bit less ugly, but still an acquired taste. This is definitely going on my list as a possibility. Cheers, Ralph
  22. Ralph_S

    MOCs: Police cars

    As a big Top Gear fan myself, I can understand that. I had thoughts of Jeremy Clarkson shouting 'Power Power Power' and calling the Ford Focus ST the 'Ford ABSO' in my mind whilst building it, not to mention the episode in which the three of them had to buy 2nd hand cars and turn them into Police cars. On behalf of all Dutch tax-payers: thank you for your contribution I know that most Passats that are sold are estate cars/ wagons and I understand why (lots more space for not all that much more money), but I chose a sedan for two reasons. I like the looks of it more, but more importantly, I knew that recreating the car's look was going to be very difficult. Many modern cars are a bit nondescript. In real life there are plenty of differences to help distinguish a Passat from the other cars in its price range, but rendered in LEGO making these differences visible is difficult. I figured that it would be more recognisable as a sedan than as an estate car. Thank you. Much appreciated. Cheers, Ralph
  23. Ralph_S

    Friends "Controversy"

    I realise that this thread has become quite long and that probably not all of you will have read everything, but the business week article I linked to in my first post made it pretty clear that LEGO are aware that the colour scheme and some of sets are stereotypical. However, irrespective of whether many girls' preference for pink colours and for dogs and ponies over cars is due to nature and/or nurture, one thing is clear: if LEGO don't opt for a somewhat 'girlie' theme, a lot of girls out there will probably either never play with LEGO or turn away from it once they reach the age (around five) where their preference apparently kicks in. That would be a terrible shame and LEGO would be stupid to do it differently. Cheers, Ralph
  24. Ralph_S

    Friends "Controversy"

    Businessweek have an interesting article on the Friends line. It deals exactly with the issues that some of the people in the comments in the page linked to in the original post were about The Lego Friends team is aware of the paradox at the heart of its work: To break down old stereotypes about how girls play, it risks reinforcing others. “If it takes color-coding or ponies and hairdressers to get girls playing with Lego, I’ll put up with it, at least for now, because it’s just so good for little girls’ brains,” says Lise Eliot. A neuroscientist at the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science in Chicago, Eliot is the author of Pink Brain Blue Brain, a 2009 survey of hundreds of scientific papers on gender differences in children. “Especially on television, the advertising explicitly shows who should be playing with a toy, and kids pick up on those cues,” Eliot says. “There is no reason to think Lego is more intrinsically appealing to boys.” from: http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/lego-is-for-girls-12142011.html Cheers, Ralph
  25. Ralph_S

    Tired of licensed sets

    Wow, this discussion has turned hot! To those of you who don't like them: -Nobody is putting a gun to your heads to buy them. -There are lots of other sets that aren't in licensed themes -not just City and Dinos, but also the utterly brilliant creator sets, so there's plenty of other stuff to buy. Some stores may mainly stock the licensed sets at the expense of the non-licensed ones (because they're cash cows), but with online resources such as brickset, eurobricks, flickr and whatnot, you actually get a better look at the sets than you can from looking at the box in a store. I buy almost all of my LEGO on-line. -While it's true that LEGO could introduce new parts in other themes, the licensed sets are some of the biggest sellers. Their sales help fund the development of useful parts that eventually will find their way into non-licensed sets -such as light-sabre blades and handles- and into our collections. They simply wouldn't be able to introduce as many new parts as they do if it weren't for the money they rake in with the licenses. Finally, a personal note, some of you seem very hung up on the design of the sets -something that I think applies to a lot of people active on Eurobricks. Everybody is free to enjoy their hobby the way they see fit, of course, but for me LEGO is about building my own stuff and I appreciate what licensed sets have to offer for that. Ralph