Ralph_S

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Everything posted by Ralph_S

  1. Some of the hinges used in, for instance, creator sets have them, but there are all kinds of other things attached to the other sides of the bricks. Perhaps that's what you remember? http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItem.asp?P=47452 Cheers, Ralph Edit: Never mind. I should have clicked the link in paul delahaye's post before writing mine...
  2. It is almost impossible to diagnose the problem without the file, but I'll have a go at it. In LDRAW files, the colour is indicated by a number: the second number on the line. The number ML-CAD uses for tan is 19. If LEOCAD uses a different number for tan, MLCAD won't recognise it as such. There's an easy workaround: if you open the LDRAW file in question using a text editor, you should be able to replace the wrong number with 19, either manually or with a suitable replace command. You should be careful with the latter to write the replace command such that it doesn't change other instances of the number in question; just the ones that are preceded by 1, since the first number on a line in which a part is placed is always 1. If the wrong colour number is, say, 42, for instance, you could try replacing "1 42" with "1 19". MLCAD will only cycle through steps if the steps are defined in the LDRAW file, which is done by having lines with "0 STEP" in the file. I hope this helps. Cheers, Ralph
  3. Ralph_S

    Display or break down?

    I've got few sets built up -Grand Carousel, Taj Mahal, Sopwith Camel, Red Baron & Lunar Lander-, but I don't even build most of the sets I buy anymore. I did buy multiple copies of the last three of those sets for the parts. I have all of the modular buildings except the Grand Emporium and built all of them, but they didn't last long. I generally enjoy building my own stuff and looking at my own stuff far more than looking at something that I built from instructions. Cheers, Ralph
  4. Ralph_S

    Brickshelf up, down..who knows!

    Thanks for the added info. I'm a happy user of flickr, but this is good to know. Cheers, Ralph
  5. Ralph_S

    Maersk Madness Winners Announced!

    Congratulations guys. My effort went into the model itself, and not into the picture. The winners definitely made the most attractive pictures, and I particularly liked Woolie's. Cheers, Ralph
  6. Here are two more. First: my Mi-24 Hind. Mi-24 Hind updated (2) by Mad physicist, on Flickr Mi-24 Hind updated (5) by Mad physicist, on Flickr One of the reasons why I used non-LEGO canopies on this model in the first place, rather than the canopies a few other builders have used successfully on their Hind models, was because I wanted to have mine open properly and I wanted mine to look similarly heavily framed as the real canopies. Whilst upgrading it with brick-built canopies, that is something I wanted to keep. That's also what made this complicated, the door for the pilot in particular. On my model it first pops out and then hinges aft. Tricky. The second one is my US Marine Corps AH-1W SuperCobra. AH-1W SuperCobra updated (1) by Mad physicist, on Flickr AH-1W SuperCobra updated (2) by Mad physicist, on Flickr The SuperCobra was one of my first models with a completely brick-built canopy, a few years ago, but at the time I couldn't figure out a way to make it open properly. Whilst updating my Hind with a brick-built canopy, I spent a fair bit of time fiddling around with various hinges to get the doors to open properly. I realised that a variant of the solution I came up with might also come in handy for the SuperCobra, and I decided to give it an upgrade. I've already also replaced the canopy on my F-117 Stealth Fighter, but am still waiting for a bricklink order to show up in the mail, so that I can replace a part. I've used a dark grey bracket for part of the canopy and have ordered a black one to replace it. Once that comes in, I'll take pictures. I've also replaced the canopy on my U-2 Dragon Lady. I'll take pictures of that ones I;ve replaced the stickers on the model. They're about three years old and look dilapidated. Cheers, Ralph Comments and faves
  7. Ralph_S

    MOC 1969 Mercury Cougar

    You may want to lower the roof by a plate or so, but that looks very good. The new bumpers are a massive improvement and I like how you've also added an interior. Somehow that makes the outside look better too. Thanks for sharing. Ralph
  8. Ralph_S

    Brickshelf up, down..who knows!

    I use dropbox too. I often work on different computers, both at work and at home, and it's an easy way to have access to my files no matter where I am. I had never imagined using it as a way of publishing pictures, though. I'm also not sure I want to. If all it takes to get to my files is a link to them -without requiring a password- I'm a bit worried about security. I've got work stuff on there! Presumably you've set part of your allocated space as publicly accessible? Cheers, Ralph
  9. Ralph_S

    MOC 1969 Mercury Cougar

    What a difference a stud makes I like the shape of it much better now. Neat grille too. Cheers, Ralph
  10. Ralph_S

    Brickshelf up, down..who knows!

    Seeing how long this thread has become, I'm getting happier and happier that I moved to flickr four years ago. I loved Brickshelf when I first learned about the on-line LEGO community, but it is just too unreliable. How is the code on flickr inconvenient? Flickr generates the code for you. You click 'share','copy html/bbcode' with a tick at 'bbcode', and simply copy and paste the code to the forum. (You can upload other file formats, but flickr turns them them into jpeg and jpeg doesn't allow transparency). Cheers, Ralph
  11. Ralph_S

    MOC 1969 Mercury Cougar

    If my experience is anything to go by, it is more likely to appreciated by people in the town forum than in the Technic/ Model Team forum. I have to echo htbomb, here, gotoAndLego. There's not a lot about the car that makes it immediately identifiable as a Mercury Cougar. Then again, the '69 Cougar doesn't have a lot of very distinctive features, which obviously makes building a recognisable model a lot harder. Racing stripes over the vinyl roof look odd. Knowing what it is that you're trying to model, I think you've done a reasonable job. I've built a lot of cars on a similar scale and don't think it is too narrow. I think it is too long, but not much! It's got a wheelbase of 16 studs and a width of 10, which makes the scale approximately 1/22 (the scale I use for many of my cars too, because it works well with the wheels). At that scale, it should be at most 28 studs long. Unless I miscounted, the model now is 29 studs long. Not far off, but on a car that isn't all that distinctive to start with, small things matter. I think you can improve the look a lot by making the front end, forward of the front wheels, one stud shorter. I'd also lose the green bits on the wheels. It's not a bad part to replicate knock-off wheel covers, but not in green. They're really distracting. There are a few small things that would add a lot to the look. Rear-view mirrors, for instance. The real car also has reflectors or indicator light repeaters on its flanks, which you can easily replicate by building trans red and trans orange 1x1 plates into the sides. Finally, the front and rear bumpers on the real car are u-shaped: they curve upwards at the corners; one of the few distinctive features the car has. This may not be particularly easy, perhaps, but would help a lot. There's not a whole lot that is needed to raise the level of this model from unremarkable to really good. Cheers, Ralph
  12. Ralph_S

    Flesh coloured Bricks?

    I've got about a dozen flesh-coloured 1x2 bricks. I can tell you where I got them, but then I'll have to come an kill you . Cheers, Ralph
  13. Ralph_S

    Maersk Madness Winners Announced!

    OK. Here we go. I had the intention of taking a photograph of my own 8-wide completely mad Maersk model together with the set for months. Lucky for me, my sister, whilst staying at my place for a while, was nice enough to build me the set last weekend. How mad is she? Maersk trains (1) by Mad physicist, on Flickr Cheers, Ralph (edited for more madness)
  14. Ralph_S

    Getting in the mood... for sorting!

    Whenever I am doing just about anything with my LEGO, I'll have music playing. That applies to sorting as well. I don't like sorting, and it doesn't get easier with all the new parts that keep appearing. The way I prepare for sorting is by ensuring that I can do it in finite batches. I don't allow the stash of unsorted bits to get so large that sorting does start to seem endless! As one buys more parts and take apart models, there will be more to sort eventually, but it is not endless. I take models that I want to get rid of apart one by one. Similarly, I sort sets that I part out one by one. I may spend an hour or two parting out a set or taking apart a model once every few weeks and them I'm done for the day! I may still have a stack of unopened and unsorted sets in my LEGO room or some other models that I may want to take apart, but I can take care of those some other day. This also has the advantage that I don't have parts from all kinds of different things all together in the same pile. By sorting set by set and model by model the parts are already presorted to some extent and that makes it a lot easier. When I am building something I may pull out a lot of parts, many of which will end up lying on my table in an unsorted mess rather than ending up in the actual model. After I finish a new model and before starting a new model, I sort the leftover parts first. That ensures that I don't create an ever growing pile of unsorted stuff myself. Of course, none of this works if you're sorting a whole collection from scratch. I wouldn't know where to start if I were faced with a few hundred thousand parts of different varieties and colours in one big pile. The thought alone scares me a bit. Fortunately I've had some sort of sorting system in place since I was a teenager, and have kept sorting it small batches as my collection expanded. Cheers, Ralph
  15. Ralph_S

    Are LEGO Trains Classed as "Real" Model Trains?

    I agree with just about everything you wrote. This sentence is the exception though, because you forget talent, skill and dedication. Cheers, Ralph
  16. Ralph_S

    Where do Rare/HTF Parts come from?

    Trans clear 1x2 are another example. They used to be as rare as rocking horse poo, but are now available in several sets. I've seen a picture of one of the LEGO games sets that suggests there will be soon be 1x4 tiles in trans clear as well. Cheers, Ralph
  17. Ralph_S

    Are LEGO Trains Classed as "Real" Model Trains?

    I think I agree with you here. It's all too common to see people spending a lot of attention to the trains, but still use cars from sets, for instance. LEGO has done a great job with many of their city vehicles in the last years, certainly compared to the rubbish they produced in the late 'nineties, but I wouldn't qualify most of them as proper models. I'm not much of a train builder (although I do think that the two that I have built as an AFOL qualify as models in their own right), but I am very fussy about cars. Seeing one of those four wide cars with fenders sticking out and knobbly tyres sticking out of those on a layout is a massive turn-off from my perspective. It all needs to be good and there aren't many people who do that. Cheers, Ralph
  18. Ralph_S

    Photos on Eurobricks

    I too like flickr, in particular because downloading the pictures I post on it is made harder. As a flickr use you can limit downloads to your contacts or to other flickr users only (although there are ways around it, of course). I've done that for my pictures. Doing that has cut down plagiarism of my photos dramatically. I do understand the sentiment about flickr a bit, though. Before I used flickr myself I didn't really like using the site either. Going from a single picture linked in a thread to an overview of all the pictures of the MOC in question is awkward, unless you know about tags or they are all in the same set. Brickshelf has been on the verge of going belly up so long now that I don't even remember the last time I uploaded anything there. Looking at the replies in this thread, there's no obvious consensus on what people prefer. Some prefer all pictures in the thread because the don't like going to an external site. Other people prefer a few, because it takes less time and if the MOC in question is good, they will go to the external site. I think I'll stick to doing what I always do: a few pictures in the thread and the rest on flickr, but perhaps I'll add a link to the set as well. Cheers, Ralph
  19. Definitely not an easy aircraft to do well. I've never built one myself, but Ed Diment, a friend of mine from the UK has. B SR71 Blackbird angled above by Lego Monster, on Flickr It is bigger than what both of us would consider minifig scale, however. Thank you. It depends on the aircraft. When I replaced the canopy on the F-16, I decided to rebuild much of the jet, but even if I wouldn't have decided to give it a comprehensive overhaul, I would have had to make many changes. On some of the other aircraft it was fairly straightforward. A few changes to the interior, to the frame and to the hinge mechanism, and that was it. This weekend I've been working on my F-117 (pictures will follow once I get a bricklink order in for a part I want to replace) and there the new canopy involved rebuilding much of the internal structure of the forward fuselage. It was one hell of a job! Cheers, Ralph
  20. Last week I replaced the canopies on two more of my aircraft. MiG-29 updated (1) by Mad physicist, on Flickr Su-24 Fencer-D (1) by Mad physicist, on Flickr Cheers, Ralph
  21. Ralph_S

    Are LEGO Trains Classed as "Real" Model Trains?

    I'm not much of a train builder myself, having built only two in the 20 years, but I have displayed LEGO models at general model building events and there always are a few people who run trains on our display. The event is Brighton Model World in particular and I'm going again this February. This discussion goes beyond trains. I build scale models of real cars, aircraft and military vehicles. I have the impression that model builders who use kits or who build their models from scratch generally don't see LEGO as a medium for building models. They see it as a toy. The fun thing about Brighton Model World is that there the public and other model enthusiasts are confronted by a bunch of people who do build detailed scale models, including trains, using these little plastic bricks. The reaction is almost always positive, and I've often heard people express surprise that it is possible to build recognisable scale models using LEGO. There's a degree of unfamiliarity with the sort of stuff AFOLs can do. Cheers, Ralph
  22. Thank you. I'm not likely to run out of things to do any time soon -I've got loads of plans and plenty of unused parts- but I will probably put it back together. It hasn't been reduced to individual components, so it ought to be fairly straightforward, certainly with the pictures. Cheers, Ralph
  23. It's been a while since I last presented a new large scale car on Eurobricks, so to make up for that, here are two The first is a completely rebuilt new version of a car I built several years ago, a GMC Yukon SUV. I decided to build it as an unmarked police car. A closer look will reveal discrete red and blue lights and a few non-standard antennae on the roof. For about a year I've been gathering paradisa pink parts with the intention of building a pink Cadillac -the match of colour and car IMO. Recently I finally got my hands on a substantial quantity of parts, so it was time to start putting bricks together. This is the result, a 1959 series 62 convertible. Building it was a bit of a challenge, mainly because of the limited selection of parts I had available in pink: 1x1, 1x2,1x3 and 1x6 plates and 1x1,1x2 and 2x2 tiles. No jumper plates, slopes or headlight bricks. Despite the limitations, I'm very happy with the end result. I hope you'll agree. Cheers, Ralph
  24. Thanks for the replies everyone. I built and posted it more than two years ago, but it's good to see that it is still popular It would have been possible to build a more accurate representation of the shape of the car, of course, but when I was gathering the pink, the only car I that I could think of building with it was the '59 Cadillac. The Cadillac has travelled the world in the two years since I built it. I had already moved from the UK to the Netherlands when I built it, but took the car to the UK for a show. I left it with a friend of mine, who has since taken it to shows in Portugal and Dubai, among others. When I last talked to him, he told me that it didn't survive the trip to Dubai. Next time I'm in the UK (in February) I expect to be handed a bag full of bits... Cheers, Ralph
  25. Ralph_S

    Where do Rare/HTF Parts come from?

    That's part of the same project. The same building also houses this model. Legoland - Boeing 747 Jumbo by benallsup, on Flickr (not my picture, BTW.) This model consists largely of plates and tiles in the same colour as the cockpit you posted. They had the intention of building several of these, but that never happened, and they sold the surplus in one of the shops as well. I've got plates and tiles in that colour, in addition to some basic bricks. I used much of it to build this diner three years ago. Diner (5) by Mad physicist, on Flickr I realise that it's not immediately obvious from either picture that it isn't just grey, but when looking at these bricks in real life the difference is very obvious. On my diner you can see it on the wall next to the entrance. The 'macaroni' bricks are regular bluish grey and the wall is pearl. It has a somewhat metallic sheen to it. Having searched a bit more on bricklink, I've come to realise that they are listed in bricklink. I found some of the plates for sale, for something like €0.20 per 1x1 plate. Cheers, Ralph