technicmath

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  1. technicmath

    [WIP] Aston Martin Valkyrie

    Another possible solution for the rear lights is this: The .ldr file can be found in the same folder: https://bricksafe.com/files/technicmath/aston-martin-valkyrie-rear-lights/Rear lights_B.ldr
  2. technicmath

    [WIP] Aston Martin Valkyrie

    @Jeroen Ottens A possible solution for the rear lights is this: The .ldr file can be found in the same folder: https://bricksafe.com/files/technicmath/aston-martin-valkyrie-rear-lights/Rear lights.ldr
  3. Thank you @kbalage for this review! At 4:32, you mention "It is not highlighted in the manual but make sure to pay attention to the position of these gears: if you add one of them the other way around, the linear actuators will work in the opposite direction.". I think that the actuators will turn in the same direction, independent of the positioning of the 20 tooth idler gears. However, at that place in this set, the same mistake is made as in set 42082, which is demonstrated in this video from @Jim: This mistake was already made in set 8043 from 2010! See this post from @Blakbird
  4. Is this a new liftarm with alternating pin holes? This part is new in yellow:
  5. I made a realistic gearbox here: This gearbox has 4 gears, has a realistic setup, can handle very high torque, fits in the studless grid construction and runs with very low friction. It would be even better if Lego made a 24 tooth clutch gear, which is in my opinion actually more useful than the 20 tooth clutch gear.
  6. Thank you! Yes, indeed, the bar at the front controls the steering, there is indeed no rack and pinion. The steering arm has two of this part at the ends:. This steering arm is moved by moving the black arm with the 1 x 9 liftarm on top. This black arm moves together with the suspension and is controlled directly from the chassis of the vehicle. Thank you! The .ldr file contains building steps. At some points, the order of these building steps needs to be followed precisely because some parts can only be placed before other parts. Also, in some building steps, multiple parts are inserted in the same step. In this case, it is sometimes necessary to build some of these parts together before mounting it to the main build. I also made a corresponding rear axle with a diff lock, portal axles and the same width as the front axle: The following picture shows the very high ground clearance: A .ldr file can be found on bricksafe. This .ldr file includes building steps. The links: Front axle: https://bricksafe.com/files/technicmath/front-live-axle-with-kingpin-inclination-diff-lock-portal-axles-constant-velocity-joints-ackermann-steering/axle.ldr Rear axle: https://bricksafe.com/files/technicmath/front-live-axle-with-kingpin-inclination-diff-lock-portal-axles-constant-velocity-joints-ackermann-steering/axle_rear.ldr
  7. Thank you! Yes, I have built it in real bricks (except for some parts such as the differential which I don't own) and the construction is very strong. Simplified in which way? For example, the design can be enormously simplified by omitting the kingpin inclination and diff lock and then also the part count will be much lower. But these are the main features of the design.
  8. This is a front live axle with kingpin inclination with angle atan(1/4)=14.036... degrees diff lock portal axles with 8/24 gear reduction constant velocity joints Ackermann steering The following picture shows the very high ground clearance and highlighted kingpin axis (in red): A .ldr file can be found on bricksafe. This .ldr file includes building steps. There are 2 black steering links on top and 2 grey links at the bottom. These create a 4-bar linkage. A caster angle can be obtained by angling the whole axle by setting up the 4-bar linkage properly.
  9. In set 42128, there seems to be this part in blue. This came so far only in 3 sets: https://www.bricklink.com/catalogItemIn.asp?P=32065&colorID=7&in=A and last time in 2003. There also seems to be a 11L version of this part: This can be seen at the back below the orange 3 x 11 panels and also at the back fork.
  10. technicmath

    [WIP] Ford Sierra RS500

    @nicjasno In the previous designs, there is an even number of gears in the geartrain. Thus the first and last gears turn in opposite directions. If you want them to turn in the same direction, an odd number of gears can be used. For example as follows with gears 12-24-20-12-24 (from bottom to top): Design A: Design B: At first sight, the gears in design A and B are on the same coordinates, but they are not because the hole of the 1 x 1 Technic Brick is 0.015 stud higher than the standard studded grid. Thus the distances from top to bottom are: Diagonally between the 24 and 12 tooth gears: in design A it is sqrt(2^2+1^2)=2.236..., in design B it is sqrt(2^2+1.015^2)=2.242... and the optimal theoretical distance is (12+24)/16=2.25. -> Design B is better Vertically between the 12 and 20 tooth gears: in both design A and B, the distance is 2, which also is the optimal theoretical distance (12+20)/16=2. Vertically between the 20 and 24 tooth gears: in design A it is 2.785, in design B it is 2.77 and the optimal theoretical distance is (20+24)/16=2.75. -> Design B is better Vertically between the 24 and 12 tooth gears: in both design A and B, the distance is 2.2+0.015=2.215 and the optimal theoretical distance is (12+24)/16=2.25.
  11. technicmath

    [WIP] Ford Sierra RS500

    @nicjasno The above gear combination can be made as follows. The orange 20 tooth gear needs to be replaced by a 28 tooth gear. Edit: an even better solution is this one: At first sight, the gears are on the same coordinates as in the previous solution, but they are not because the hole of the 1 x 1 Technic Brick is 0.015 stud higher than the standard studded grid. Thus now the distances from top to bottom are: Diagonally between the 24 and 28 tooth gears: the distance in real life is sqrt(2.515^2+2^2)=3.213... and the optimal theoretical distance is (24+28)/16=3.25. Vertically between the 28 and 24 tooth gears: the distance in real life is 3.3-(2*0.015)=3.27 and the optimal theoretical distance is (24+28)/16=3.25. Vertically between the 24 and 12 tooth gears: the distance in real life is 2.2+0.015=2.215 and the optimal theoretical distance is (12+24)/16=2.25. @tomek9210 The chain does not fit with the 12 tooth gear.
  12. technicmath

    [WIP] Ford Sierra RS500

    @nicjasno In your stream "Lego Ford Sierra Live Stream 54 - Is this the turbo?" (see below), there is a gear combination situated at the engine with the gears 12 (at the bottom) - 24 (at the side) - 16 - 16 - 16 - 24 (two times at the top). This can be made with less gears with these options: 24 24 20 12 20 12 For the gear combination between 24 and 20, the distance is 2 both horizontal and vertical. This is not a very good solution since then the diagonal is sqrt(2^2+2^2)=2.828... Multiplying with 16 to obtain the number of teeth on the gears gives 45.254... but 20+24=44 and this gap between 45.254... and 44 is too big. A better option is this: 24 24 28 24 12 For the gear combination between 24 and 28, the horizontal distance is 2 and the vertical distance is 2.5. Then the diagonal is sqrt(2^2+2.5^2)=3.201... Multiplying with 16 to obtain the number of teeth on the gears gives 51.224... And 24+28=52 which should be close enough.
  13. Why is the axle from this part 3 studs long while the axle from this part is 2 studs long? I do not complain, I find it very useful that the axle is 3 studs long because then it is easier to build a strong drivetrain with liftarm-gear-liftarm which requires a length of 3 studs on the axle. Why can an axle slide in this part but not in this part ? That is a necessary property for some applications such as in a multilink suspension. (Of course there are other solutions to make a sliding axle but these require more space.) Why is this part 3 studs long? At first sight it seems that it could be 2 studs long which would make constructions more compact, but maybe then the connection with this part would be less strong and/or the angle they can make would be less?
  14. technicmath

    Gears-efficient gearbox

    Below is a possible solution to make this gearbox in a studless construction: The orange 36-tooth gears need to be replaced by 28-tooth gears and the dark bluish gray driving ring should be the newer 3L version. The 24-tooth gear at the bottom and at the right, the 12-tooth gear at the bottom and the 20-tooth gear at the right provide possibilities to go back in the studless grid. Or universal joints can be used to go from the axle through the 1 x 1 technic bricks back to the studless grid.
  15. Sorry, I did not realize that a flex axle should go through that place. Another possibility is to use this piece: The axle hole of this piece connects to the black liftarm. Then a 3L liftarm (possible at both sides of the above piece) can be used: 2 pin holes in the pins of the above piece and 1 pin hole at the top where the flex axle can go through.