20feet

Eurobricks Vassals
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Everything posted by 20feet

  1. Ya, you have to look pretty closely at a 1x8 tile to notice that it's in the "wrong" sans serif font. I'm not really a font obsessive, but I'm quite persnickety with my MOCs. It's like that Steve Jobs quote about the back of the cabinet. And you're right about the change! I didn't notice but it looks like the Singapore and Great Pyramid labels are set in Cera Pro. Lego does like to make minor tweaks to their pieces for no obvious reason. Nice catch Mr Arial
  2. I found the answer! According to Adobe Reader the PDF contains a font called "LEGOChalet60" in different variants. Seems to be a proprietary version of the font family Chalet - very similar if not identical to Chalet London Nineteen Sixty. BTW I tried a bunch of online image font finder tools looking for this - they're all terrible.
  3. Hey does anyone know what font TLG uses for the printed city names in architecture sets? I'm making my own city skyline, and I've been hunting around the internet for the font and I just can't find it.
  4. 20feet

    [MOC] The Return of The X-Wing

    Ah, ya I should have a look at those 3D models. I was referring to this image: It's not terrible, but there are some issues. I've been looking for photos of original props, and came across an infuriatingly rare Japanese book that apparently has pages of prop photos for every X-wing model in ANH: It's annoying to know these photos exist and have no way to access them. But there are a few good pictures shared here. I think they'll be my main source if I ever get around to building my own X-wing. Is your second X-wing closer to the proportions of the Rouge Squadrons model than your first version?
  5. 20feet

    [MOC] The Return of The X-Wing

    Hi @Jerac, I'm just now taking a closer look at this and I'm curious what you're using as a reference for the X-wing proportions. Your previous version looks like a pretty close match for the blueprint in the Owners' Workshop Manual, but the new one's a bit different - particularly the longer nose. I don't completely trust the OWM (it led me slightly astray with my TIE Fighter) but it's hard to find more a definitive source. The perspective in photos can be a nightmare, as you noted.
  6. 20feet

    Modding the Barracuda thread

    Thanks! It's a fun challenge to build something from the pieces of just one set. But it's rare for a set to have such an awesome "B Model" that also leaves so many pieces for a cool side-build.
  7. 20feet

    Modding the Barracuda thread

    Ya I get that some people would prefer a subtler colour scheme, but for a set aimed at kids (or adults nostalgic for classic Pirates) the bright colours are great.
  8. 20feet

    Modding the Barracuda thread

    Hi all, I'm late to the party, but I finally got this set for Christmas and once I built the "B model" ship I knew I wanted to do something with all the leftover island pieces. If I'd seen this thread at the time I might have built one of the MOCs above instead, but I'm glad I spent the time to create my own! I built a "Traders' Cay" with a working crane to hoist cargo from a rowboat. Also features discreet treasure chest storage: And a gem buried by an unfortunate prisoner: It's fun to have an island side-build for the pirates to interact with. More pics on my Flickr! What do you think?
  9. 20feet

    T70 X-Wing: A classic revisited

    White or LBG is the eternal question of X-wing building. I generally prefer LBG, but this white version looks really sharp. Nice work! I just checked and I have trans clear studs with bars in 2 distinct heights. This is very troubling! Are you saying that Lego includes 2 different molds of this piece in the same colour in the same set? WTF?
  10. 20feet

    T70 X-Wing: A classic revisited

    It's really interesting to see the different versions. I do think the final version looks best from those options. The ones with built clear sections have a nicer shape but they're clunky and distracting. This persuades me that the only alternative would be a built frame without "glass" (which would look out of place in your lineup). It looks like the fuselage is basically the same shape in each version. The too-wide canopy doesn't look too out of place on the narrow hull.
  11. 20feet

    T70 X-Wing: A classic revisited

    Ya, I won't hassle you any further about using the glass canopy. It makes sense to stick with a consistent style when you're designing a whole fleet of ships, and that means making bigger compromises in some cases. I was curious whether you had to compromise the shape of the T-70 fuselage to fit the canopy - specifically the width and angles at the top.
  12. 20feet

    T70 X-Wing: A classic revisited

    Congratulations on beating the final boss! I'll always prefer the T-65, but it's definitely an achievement. I think the canopy extension technique you settled on is probably the best possible, if you have to use that stupid piece. It just makes me want to see a version with a build canopy - maybe someone will oblige. Did you have to alter the shape of the fuselage to accommodate the canopy piece? I like the round shape of the back end of the canons - looks like just some plates with pin holes to attach them to the wings. Should work on the T-65 too, right? I guess they're too narrow, but might be worth it for the shape. I'd be interested to read more about the design process and the compromises you had to make if you care to share. This is the most exciting part TBH :)
  13. 20feet

    All-New TIE Fighter MOC

    I’ve finally finished my first real MOC! My goal was simply to make a minifig-scale TIE Fighter that is as accurate as possible in its proportions and details. (Note: if any of my terminology confuses you, feel free to consult the glossary.) I started working on this in March, after completing my mod of @Jerac’s TIE Fighter (working from his first version). My mod changed a lot of the details, but kept the internal structure of the cockpit and spars. It also kept the wings mostly unchanged—not because I was satisfied with them, but because as a novice, reworking them felt daunting. Wing Hubs I knew that the technic 6-blade rotor had potential for a wing hub (thanks to Koen Zwanenburg) but it doesn’t come in LBG. I found a way to skin it that closely mimics the ship’s greebling, and isn’t too thick. Once I made these wing hubs, I knew I wanted to make a whole new TIE Fighter to match them. Wings I built a rim with the correct size and shape, and filled in the wing panels with my stacked 1x1 technique that suggests ridges running perpendicular to the wing edges. Coincidentally, 1 stud is very close to the right spacing for these ridges, so the overall look is quite accurate. I wanted to minimize gaps around the spokes, which meant using a lot of 1x1 plates (almost 150 per wing). I placed pairs of plates together where possible, to give a suggestion of the subtler parallel ridges. For the spokes I wanted smoothly tapered tiles rather than the standard steps and exposed studs. The spokes are less sturdy this way, but the wings overall are reasonably solid. The angles are a perfect 60 degrees. It’s annoying that TLG printed a tile for the central wheel with quite accurate details, but shifted the angles to 45/90. Spars Once I had the wings I moved inward to the spars, which present a trilemma: ideally you’d want your TIE spars to be cylindrical, sturdy, and free of non-Lego parts. You can have two of the three. My cylindrical, axle-based construction looks far better than stacked plates, but makes for wobbly, droopy wings. With standard Lego axles, this model is for display only. Following Cereal Eating Builder’s lead, I caved and bought metal axles. The hardest detail in the whole model to render was the “shoulder plate” on either side of the cockpit. I made a couple dozen prototypes (some early ones here) before finding one that represented all the angles (so many angles!) and wasn’t too chunky and distracting. I don’t love the gaps and exposed studs, but this is the best solution I could find. Cockpit Exterior I still prefer quarter domes for the cockpit. They really limit interior space but the smoothly rounded shape can’t be beat, and the greebles I wanted to include fit nicely in between them. The main inaccuracy in this model is the size of the canopy and top hatch, which should be 5 studs in diameter at this scale. The only solution would be to scale the ship up to match the 6-stud canopy, or down to the 4-stud version. Maybe someday. The canopy hinge and the quarter domes also push the cannons too low and wide, but I was able to get them just a bit closer than my previous version. I’m convinced that space binoculars are the best piece for the “bowties” beside the canopy, but they seemed impossible to attach. I struggled for a long time to make even an asymmetric connection with a clip or minifig hand, and I almost gave up before hitting on a sneaky solution. Can you guess how I did it? There’s a hint in the interior shots below. Rear The rear cone was a challenge. My previous TIE had a crude version with handlebars and 1x1 clips. I wanted something cleaner, and posing stands (now in LBG!) seemed promising. The trick was filling in the gaps between them. Purists may feel that I’ve cut my pneumatic hoses too short, but I’m pretty pleased with the result. The main issue again is that it’s a little oversized—6 studs wide rather than 5—but I’m ok with it because it’s in scale with the hatch and canopy. I was able to include the cone hump at the top—another oft-overlooked greeble. To me the dark bowties around the engines are an essential detail, and I was determined to include the red engines, which I couldn't fit in my previous TIE. I considered cutting a red hose, but I was ultimately able to work in a nipple tile. Cockpit Structure It was challenging to attach the spars securely to the cockpit. 1x2 bricks with axle holes are the obvious choice, but I couldn’t handle the asymmetry. There aren't many other options, so I ended up using 2x2 bricks with pins, reinforced by 2x4 technic plates and brackets. With metal axles they're almost solid—in spite of the reinforcements, with swooshing the spars can pull free and rotate forward slightly on the pin bricks. The quarter ellipse liftarms are structural, and not only do they make for a smoothly rounded exterior, but their half-stud width is ideal because the details around the edge of the cockpit—the hatch side greebles and the shoulder slopes—are 1 stud wide. TIE builders who prioritize smoothness and disapprove of my wanton greebling might still be interested in this technique. Cockpit Interior I wanted to include the shape of the dark grey “dashboard” and the triangle at the top of the canopy, since these are visible on the exterior model (although missing from the cockpit set). The interior is very constrained by the quarter domes and the structure holding them together. I was less concerned with modelling the interior accurately, but I did want to make sure that it fit a TIE Pilot (with oversized helmet) and that it looked reasonably cool. The pilot sits quite centred in the cockpit. There’s no space for a seat, but the movie set didn’t have one either. I was tempted to add a bunch of interior details with stickers, but once you start with that it’s hard to know where to stop. In the end I restrained myself to just 2: the iconic targeting display, and a tongue-in-cheek tribute to the rear “window”. Other designers have included transparent rear windows in their designs, but I haven’t seen any that put the interior window the correct position—high up behind the pilot’s head. Struggles with Scale This is my first attempt at scale modelling, and in the end I found the proportions are not as precise as I’d hoped. Part of the problem is that the hubs, although reasonably flat, are much thicker than the “real thing”. I wanted to define the overall width by the centre of the wings from the front view, meaning that the chubby hubs encroach into the spars’ space, and the T-shaped end plate gets squashed. But beyond that, my spars ended up being a bit shorter than the reference, for reasons I don't fully understand. I may try to fix this at some point, but I’d probably need to learn digital design to really nail it down. The side view, however, fits like Cinderella's slipper. Acknowledgements & References I’ve enjoyed discussing TIE Fighter building with Jerac, Cereal Eating Builder, and others. (If anyone else would like some feedback about a TIE in progress, get in touch! In building this I’ve gained a lot of knowledge that is really only useful to a freelance TIE MOC consultant.) My primary reference (the white overlay above) was the blueprint from the TIE Fighter Owners’ Workshop Manual. Unfortunately, I’ve recently noticed some inaccuracies compared to physical models. The EFX prop replica seems more reliable, and you can find some pictures of the original props here. Glossary I tried to keep this introduction short and sweet (seriously) but I am prepared to discuss every detail of this model at length if anyone cares to ask. In anticipation, I’ve created a visual glossary of all the greebles I tried to include, so we have some shared vocabulary. What do you think?
  14. 20feet

    All-New TIE Fighter MOC

    Thanks Jerac! I did figure out how to do most of it in Studio so I'll probably share that, even though it doesn't include the hoses and rubber bands. I don't plan on releasing instructions because 1) it sounds like a lot of work, 2) I used several rare pieces that wouldn't be practical on a larger scale, 3) I used techniques that would be hard to describe in instructions and would probably try the patience of most builders, and 4) I'd rather see people incorporate some of my ideas into their own MOCs than build duplicates of mine. I like the freedom of designing a one-off MOC. I wouldn't want to give that up to try to compete with Jerac and Brickvault, and I think trying to turn something like this into a product would be frustrating for all involved. But I do feel the need to brag about some of the techniques I used, so I'll probably share more about that even though no one's asking :)
  15. 20feet

    All-New TIE Fighter MOC

    I don't - yet. I've been trying to learn Stud.io and working on building this model digitally. The problem is I used a LOT of illegal techniques which I'm having trouble duplicating in Stud.io. (Any digital pros out there who can tell me how to position pieces precisely in ways Stud.io doesn't think will fit?) If I can make a good digital model I may share that (along with a lengthy disclaimer).
  16. That's a great-looking AT-AT! Can you describe how it differs from the other big AT-AT MOCs you mentioned?
  17. 20feet

    All-New TIE Fighter MOC

    I made a video comparing the stability of this MOC with Lego axles vs metal ones from Dark Ice Designs. The difference is dramatic. So which do you prefer: 1. Sturdy blocky spars like Jerac's 2. Wobbly, cylindrical, all-Lego spars, or 3. Sturdy, cylindrical spars with non-Lego metal axles?
  18. 20feet

    All-New TIE Fighter MOC

    Lol sorry, that's a bit of a troll. I looked into this recently and the bottom line is there are several inconsistencies between the interior TIE Fighter set and the exterior model—the set designers back in the day just weren't that concerned with accuracy. You can read my hard-hitting investigation starting here.
  19. 20feet

    All-New TIE Fighter MOC

    Thanks everyone! I agree that the wing rim and spokes look too smooth in comparison to the hub and other details. I thought about covering everything with hoses, but it would just get way too thick. Would look better from straight on but worse from the side. The only way I'd consider to add more detail there is stickers—a sticker running down the middle of the tiles would be closer to the right thickness than a hose. But philosophically I'm reluctant to add tons of stickers.
  20. 20feet

    Modified TIE Fighter MOC

    Thanks everyone! Well, with Lego axles it's wobbly, but "shelf-stable". With metal axles, fairly solid. There are several greebly bits that are easy to bump out of place - I had to re-take some pictures because I later noticed something was crooked.
  21. 20feet

    Modified TIE Fighter MOC

    I've made a lot of special modifications myself. Hi, this is my first real post here. Let me know what I'm doing wrong! I built @Jerac's TIE Fighter a couple years ago, and I've been tinkering with it off and on ever since. This was the first MOC I bought and built, and I remain very impressed by the strength, elegance, and ingenuity of the design. I've seen a lot of TIE MOCs since, and Jerac's is probably still my favourite. I wanted to say that clearly at the start, before getting into the nit-picking! Here's what I changed: Wing Gaps I always found the holes in the wings very distracting. They're easy enough to fill with 1x4 tiles, if you remove a plate from the base of the horizontal spokes. The result not only looks better, but holds the spokes in place more securely. I added 1x1 plates to the top and bottom corners to fill another gap. Canopy/Gun Mount I was also dissatisfied with the canopy/guns/controls assembly, which is a precarious stack of rods and clips. It's fiddly and fragile, and leaves extraneous T-pieces sticking out the front. Why did Jerac build it this way? I think because the cockpit's top, front and bottom dishes wrap around the quarter domes and they need to fit snugly to approximate a sphere, so the space available to mount the canopy and guns is incredibly tight. My solution was to mount the canopy on old robot arms. They're the right length, and they have a squared off neck where I've attached the gun mounts, which helps hold the guns in position (at least on 1 axis). Top Hatch Mount The top hatch in Jerac's model sits noticeably to the rear of centre. It's a bit tricky to fix because the hatch mount connects to the top of the central hexagon, which also needs to be positioned precisely. I had to rework my initial solution when I redid the rear - more on that below. Wing Construction I love Jerac's smooth stacked-brick wings, but they give the impression of subtle stripes running parallel to the wings edges, like concentric hexagons, whereas the real TIEs have prominent ridges perpendicular to the edges. It occurred to me that I could suggest these by using tall 1x1 bricks instead of long bricks. Stacked 1x1s do not make a strong wall, but because the hub/spokes/rim design is so secure, the finished wings are plenty solid. The main drawback of this design is that light can shine through the tall seams when you look straight on, lessening the sense of solidity. But I find the overall effect delightful. I used 1x8 tiles for all the spokes, to clear some extraneous studs off the wings. Interior I spent a lot of time trying to mimic the cockpit's triangular panels in some way, but couldn't find a solution at this scale. So I went for a looser interpretation, inspired by the beautiful Inthert version and Jerac's TIE Defender. The interior space in this model is very limited (even the Defender has an extra stud of depth) but I was able to include a lot of detail. I also made space for the newer, oversized TIE pilot helmets. I borrowed the control design from the Bricks Feeder/Inthert interior. I'm disappointed that LEGO has never printed the TIE Fighter targeting display. I may print my own sticker for that. The top hatch isn't functional, but it does need to swing up for cockpit access, so I added some simple details underneath. The scale is way off, but I like the way the 1x2 grills evoke the skylight pattern on the hatch. Cockpit Side Greebling I wanted to include the little dark grey bow ties on either side of the canopy. This was challenging for a few reasons: They should be centred, which means holding a small piece in the middle of a 2-stud space and minimizing the gaps around it. Everything should be curved to match the quarter domes. I also wanted to accommodate interior detailing in this space. Finally, there's an identical pattern in the rear, around the engines. These areas should look similar in front and back (see below). I'm quite satisfied with this solution: Wing Spars The arms (technically "spars") attaching the cockpit to the wings are full of Lego-unfriendly details: cylinders, thin rings and fins, and the notched plates next to the cockpit that slope in like 4 directions at once. Their diameter is small and they need to be strong. I did my best to imitate the details while sticking with Jerac's sturdy plate-based design. I swapped the 1x4 brackets for 1x2s to clear a couple studs off the front. There are more brackets inside to add strength and attach interior details. I tried a lot of different pieces for the bent T detail next to the wings. Pneumatic t-pieces seemed to best capture the shape. I'm dissatisfied with basically every part of these arms, but I haven't seen other versions at this scale that I prefer. Most of the key details are at least present, although crudely represented. Rear The central rear ring is the last piece of the original that I altered (so far). I'd done earlier revisions of the engines and hatch mount that retained the quarter ring tiles. I appreciate their smoothness even though they're too flat, and sink the central hexagon behind a circular cutout. I finally noticed that the outer diameter of this ring should match the top hatch and front canopy – it should be 5 studs (scaled to the overall model) or 6 (matching the canopy and hatch). That pushed me to build a custom ring with the key features of: 6 stud diameter Outer cone shape Inner inverted cone, and Prominent central hexagon with slightly recessed black interior. Drawbacks: I couldn't find a way to keep the red engine centers with this design I also couldn't include the bump on the top of the cone. The top hatch sits ~1mm too far forward (but closer to centre than the original) The outer diameter is 6 studs, but only at the points where the handlebars attach The handlebars aren't angled quite right, so the clips that form the ring are a bit skewed The inner inverted cone is too deep And of course this segmented design is not as smooth as the rest of the model. In spite of all that, I think the shapes are quite accurate for this scale, and I'm satisfied with the result. A Note on Scale The cockpit is about 9 studs tall, including the top hatch and bottom dish. At that scale the front canopy, top hatch and rear cone should all be 5 studs in diameter. It would be interesting to see a TIE MOC scaled up to fit the 6x6 dish – a cockpit diameter of ~11 studs. Conclusion I've changed most of the pieces and the details in this model, without changing much about the structure or general appearance. I'm still tinkering with it. I've got some ideas to rework the wings and spars, but that's quite a big project. Some of these modifications are a matter of taste, but I'm quite pleased with the results. I'm interested to hear others' opinions. Credits In addition to Jerac, I appreciated and drew inspiration from: Inthert and Bricks Feeder: Beautiful interiors Koen Zwanenburg: Clever cockpit side details, more accurate shape of the wing hubs (although I stuck with Jerac's for now) Fuku Saku: Nice front and back cockpit details. The rear cone piece is clean and accurate, but loses the center details. Force of Bricks: Interesting arm details and rear shape. If I do a more thorough redesign I'll likely borrow a lot from this model. Pasq67: Impressive details at a smaller scale. Cereal Eating Builder: Incredible accuracy at a much larger scale. Reference Photos The EFX prop replica seems to be the most accurate model available. This gallery is my main resource. For proportions I referred to this blueprint from the Tie Fighter Owners' Workshop Manual Some pictures of original props here A discussion of TIE Fighter scale
  22. 20feet

    Modified TIE Fighter MOC

    I finished my new TIE Fighter! Will discuss in a new topic here shortly.
  23. 20feet

    Modified TIE Fighter MOC

    Yep, just waiting for some rare pieces to arrive. Then I think I'll be done. But you know how that goes.
  24. 20feet

    Modified TIE Fighter MOC

    Thanks! Can’t wait to share - I’m (still) almost done
  25. 20feet

    Modified TIE Fighter MOC

    I have a teaser to share for my upcoming all-new TIE Fighter MOC, which I've been working on for the past 6+ months: When I finished my mod of Jerac's TIE Fighter in February, I kept the original wing shape and structure. I wanted to build my own version, but I knew it would take some work. Once I figured out the wing hub, I wanted to rebuild everything else with the same level of accuracy and detail. I'm almost done.