cb4

Eurobricks Citizen
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Everything posted by cb4

  1. cb4

    WIP Barbary Corsair Xebec

    Yep, it's a rowboat. Sloop in this sense is just a translation of "chaloupe" in the plans. I think "chaloupe" might actually be better translated as "launch" in this case, but "sloop" is pretty broad to begin with. I may end up using the lego prefab boats, but I want to try with bricks first - more fun. This just just a rough attempt - I suspect I can do better.
  2. cb4

    WIP Barbary Corsair Xebec

    Quick and dirty first pass at the sloop, using hypotech due to space constraints.
  3. cb4

    Best and Worst ideas for PoTC sets

    I'd like to see the Jolly Mon (Anamaria's little boat that Jack steals and then leaves at the bottom of Port Royal harbour in the first film). Brick built, leaking, and with Jack bailing
  4. cb4

    WIP Barbary Corsair Xebec

    It's true, there are a fair number of very nice xebecs on this forum - it must be the cool factor. It's the barbary pirates themselves that I feel are underrepresented, particularly in light of their longevity and success in the Mediterranean. I'll be building the sloop (referred to as the "chaloupe" in the plans), but it remains to be seen exactly how I'll go about it. It's relatively small so it'll be tricky! Yup, you can see an example with a smaller ship from the very beginning in this thread. Yes, I've learned my lesson about taking pictures of black bricks. There are a few differences with my new project - particularly the different style of hinges I'm using, which have distinct advantages and drawbacks, but the principle is the same.
  5. cb4

    MOC: A busy shipyard

    The shrouds are at an angle - but maybe not as aggressive an angle as you have in mind. The chain plates extend two studs in front of the centre of the mast, and four studs behind it. The only issue I have with extending the shrouds further aft is that it limits the angle that the booms are able to swing through. I knew I'd catch some heat for the blocks A agree they do look a little strange, but due to the size of the ship even a 1x2 block looks large! I kind of like them, so they'll stay for now. She will get sails at some point. I don't think I'm going to name her until she's really complete.
  6. cb4

    MOC: A busy shipyard

    I finally found time to do some rigging. I think it turned out well, so I decided to have some fun and build quick little scene. I haven't often seen anything as mundane as loading cargo, so here it is. Note the redcoat official collecting his "fee". What kind of business is this ship in, exactly?
  7. cb4

    The Pickle: Now under sail

    I have no idea how accurate it is, but I found a pretty good article about the Pickle: H M Schooner Pickle (www.exeterflotilla.org) It offers a possible explanation on why the Pickle was so named. And, let me say that I really like your MOC, particularly how the stern is constructed in order to get a less abrupt curve than what is offered by the regular hull pieces.
  8. cb4

    MOC: A busy shipyard

    I do wish I could have come up with something that required a little less structure to support it. Maybe once I rig the ship I can work those in as functional in some way. That's definitely something to consider. I'm certainly going to have to experiment a bit with the chain plates. One thing I have noticed with a few ships is the use of a rubber band as a tensioner to avoid having slackness due to strings of slightly inconsistent length. I'll need to buy some string and rubber bands and try a few different arrangements. I'm a little bit jammed for coloured plates/tiles of appropriate sizes, unfortunately. The colour scheme is a compromise, but I think it looks decent. Mainly I didn't want it to be too drab with the black and white and grey. It kind of reminds me of the old Caribbean Clipper. Ultimately, I may simply have to buy some different colours of 1x1s and 2x2s. Even a proof of concept should look good. Thanks for the feedback!
  9. cb4

    MOC: A busy shipyard

    For insurance reasons, I've added railings. As it turns out the work on the stern inspired me on a good way to do them.
  10. cb4

    MOC: A busy shipyard

    It's been a while since I had a chance to work on this, but based on the great feedback, I've redesigned the stern. The tiller is still functional, but the lever goes through a channel in the stern and up through the deck. I think it worked out fairly well. I finally found a use for that black parrot.
  11. cb4

    HMS Interceptor

    The sides of pif500's ship have no curve where the log bricks are used - I don't think you can claim that he used maydayartist's technique at all without seeing the inside of the ship. I don't think anyone should be able to demand credit for something as simple as using a particular kind of brick in a fairly trivial way. While it's nice to receive credit for one's innovations, it seems a bit over the top to assume that nobody could ever come up with the same idea independently. If you think that someone has used your work as a reference, you can always send them a private message ask them where they got it from and to explain that it is polite to give credit if they used your model. In some ways this whole discussion seems pretty dangerous to me. If I come up with a technique that solves a particular problem in an optimal way, and I post it here, am I to be able to demand credit every time it is used thereafter in perpetuity? What if there is no better way to do it, or if the other ways of doing it aren't as elegant or have more problems? What if someone comes up with an new way of using my technique that is in itself novel? Who gets the credit then? The whole point of coming here for me is to share ideas, not hold them hostage. If someone uses one of my techniques and doesn't choose to credit me, it's disappointing but I don't really have a problem with that. I would have a problem if they claimed to have invented it themselves, because that would be a false statement (unless of course they came up with it independently, which is more-or-less plausible depending on the complexity). I want to build awesome MOCs, but more than that I want others to build awesome MOCs, so I develop techniques in the hope that others will use them and further develop them. The easiest way to make sure that you are credited (indirectly) is probably by making your technique's name part of the lexicon. This has happened with CGH's technique because he created a nice tutorial and it's much easier to refer to the method as "CGH's technique" or "CGH's tumblehome technique" than to say "shims under hinged sides with jumper offsets". Really though I think that CGH has a big advantage here because his acronym is only three characters
  12. cb4

    W.I.P Golden Hind?

    I found a blog using google image search that has some (accurate?) plans for the Golden Hind. The first image is small, but the others are large and quite detailed. They're in German but they're pretty easy to figure out. http://planurinave.blogspot.com/2009/04/golden-hind-1575.html It even has hull lines! I'm definitely building my next ship from diagrams like these Hope this helps.
  13. cb4

    W.I.P Golden Hind?

    This is already really beautiful. The only thing I would change would be the straight black lines around the bows and the flat beakhead. The stern and the rear three quarters has a beautiful curve, but everything straightens out a little too much up front. If it's a huge headache I wouldn't change it.
  14. cb4

    MOC: A busy shipyard

    I'm sorry Admiral - I was confused by the filename.
  15. cb4

    MOC: A busy shipyard

    I would love to do a sloped stern post, but then I would need to find a way to hang the rudder off that in a nice way - this ship is so small that it isn't very forgiving of complexity. Right now the rudder clearance is less than the thickness of a plate - much more than that and you see a LOT of daylight. If the stern post isn't vertical then the axis or rotation of the rudder won't be vertical either and then things get unpleasant. You either need to align your hinges with that non-vertical axis or look into ball joints of some kind. I think that this is the reason you don't see many lego ships with sloped stern posts. If you have some examples I'd love to see them. I do know what you mean about the decoration protruding but not the stern. I'll definitely look closely at that - I can definitely fill out the stern post at the top so that's not the case. I'm actually not convinced that the ship in the picture is a schooner - it seems to have a square-rigged fore-course. I don't think I trust that website when it comes to sail-plans. It also says that THIS is a brigantine: However, a brigantine should be fore-and-aft rigged (or at least the mainsail should be) on the mainmast. It kind of looks like what they call a schooner is in fact a brigantine whereas what they call a brigantine is actually a brig. I'm not using any particular real ship as the model - but yes, I will rig her as a schooner, and I will try to be as faithful as possible to the way ships of the period looked and were rigged - with a lot of artistic license thrown in EDIT: Seems I was looking at a different website that has the same picture - or maybe the original: http://pirateshold.buccaneersoft.com/pirate_ships.html
  16. cb4

    MOC: A busy shipyard

    After much experimentation, here is another update: Now I need to buy a lot of string...
  17. cb4

    MOC: A busy shipyard

    Yes, I think I would like a more solid line of color. I need to go through my inventory to see what colors I have for 1x1 plates. I only have four of the dark brown and they're all on there already I don't have many in any particular color so it's a bit of a challenge. I might do some kind of checker pattern if I can find colors I like. I wanted to do the rudder attachments in grey, but I don't have the right pieces, so I compromised on blue. Because the ship is built out instead of up, it's pretty easy to go back and change those type of details. Superstructure and standing rigging is next. I think it will be two masted - perhaps a topsail schooner rig. Something easy and cheap to operate! The deck is removable for maintenance purposes - here's a bonus picture of the interior:
  18. cb4

    MOC: A busy shipyard

    Quick update:
  19. cb4

    Planning Goonies moc

    I remember that movie! I found a couple more shots, including a decent detail picture of the stern. There doesn't seem to be a lot of information out there about this ship, but according to imdb it was based on Errol Flynn's ship the Albatross from the movie The Sea Hawk (1940). It seems that the Albatross was a British privateer. It looks like some Goonie fans have also done research on this. I hope it's ok to link this: Goonies forum topic From the hull form/rigging/etc it looks like a British galleon to me. A decent analog might be the Golden Hind (Sir Francis Drake's ship), but that ship has a vastly different style of decoration. Since the Sea Hawk is set during the reign of the Spanish King Philip II, it's from the same period as the Golden Hind. Hope that helps! EDIT: Forgot to mention, the ship's name is the Inferno.
  20. cb4

    W.I.P Port

    This looks absolutely brilliant already. I'm always impressed by the detail and composition on your MOCs. They manage to look organic and "random" while still looking very well balanced.
  21. cb4

    MOC: A busy shipyard

    I would like to go all with tiles but I do not think that I have enough, so it's going to be studs out for now :) The studs do help hide the sharp edges of the bricks, however, and I find I like the contrasting texture. Colour should not be a big issue once I have the pieces - it's very easy to remove any number of strakes. It is very much built like a real ship so maintenance is done much the same way :) I now have a reference so I won't mess up the lines. This ship isn't really going to get any taller except for maybe a little bit of a quarterdeck as it is simply not that big (perhaps with additional slopes). If I were going to make much it taller, I would either build on the deck/keel structure, or I'd do something like CGH's technique using hinges attached to what on this ship are the gunwales so that I can have the sides lean in at the desired angle without using huge numbers of slopes. The upper parts of the sides of the ship would be non-structural in this case. The technique is definitely a tradeoff - it gains a closer approximation to a V shaped hull before applying any bricks, and gives the gunwales a nice curve - but transitioning back to a traditional build is difficult.
  22. cb4

    MOC: A busy shipyard

    I agree completely - I want to do a nice white bottom/black sides/coloured trim colour scheme for the hull. Right now I don't have the white bricks to do it but that should change soon.
  23. cb4

    MOC: A busy shipyard

    What do you mean the hull is half finished? I don't see a single plank! Uh, this way sir... Might need more caulking - I see daylight.
  24. cb4

    MOC: A busy shipyard

    I think that this technique may indeed work well on a larger ship. My goal with the smaller ship is to determine its viability for creating small brick-built hulls. There are a lot of techniques for larger brick-built hulls, and in general the larger you make a ship, the more flexibility is gained. Creating small brick-built hulls that look convincing seems to be an open problem. The best evidence of that is how the vote for the Best Lego Sailing Ships (Minifig Illusion Scale) is dominated by prefabricated hulls. In any case, if you want to try using this technique, you're going to need to understand the geometry involved. The framing technique uses 5/4/3 pythagorean triangles. Here's a frame I've created for illustration purposes. It uses the old style hinges due to their geometric properties. I don't believe that using the old style hinges is strictly necessary, but it makes life much easier because they take up very little space and you don't need to make many allowances for them. For a really large ship you might consider using technic pins instead since they'd be much stronger. The bottom three hinges form two 5/4/3 triangles side by side. The "5" is the diagonal side, and it is 2.5 studs (25 units) long. The "3" is the horizontal side, and it is 1.5 studs (15 units) long. The "4" is the vertical side, which is 2 studs (20 units) long. The top two hinges (they're completely unnecessary, but they show that you can place more hinges at regular intervals) simply double the triangles. Note that the middle hinges exploit the hollow studs of the old style hinges, which are offset by half a stud on the yellow 1x3s. This method for creating a frame works well, but sometimes you can't fit those hinges in there without making your frame too wide. This is of particular concern when you're making a small ship. That's ok, because there are other places you can put your hinges to retain a rigid structure with the same geometry. Here are some of them: This technique also uses 5/4/3 triangles, but they're oriented a bit differently. The "5" is now the vertical side, which is 5 studs (50 units) long. Because 50 does not divide by 4 evenly, there is a old grey Dalek brick (10 units) to fix our numbers. The "4" is the diagonal side, which is 4 studs (40 units) long. The "3" is also diagonal and perpendicular to the "4" side. It is 3 studs (30 units), and thus needs the old grey rocket bricks to even things out (1 rocket brick + 5 plates [you must include one half of the thickness of each hinge in your calculation] = 30 units). Note that this pattern is also repeatable - another hinge can be placed on the center line another 50 units up. Additionally, two small triangles can be created using additional hinges so that the frame can be attached to our vertical structure. Since these triangles alone can make our structure rigid, the bottom hinge can be completely removed if the profile of the ship's hull calls for it. Now we have two frames, we can attach them together. This doesn't look like much, but because our frames have a consistent geometry, they fit together exactly. We can attach them along the diagonal sides, or along the vertical middle. We can build as many frames as we want, and they can have any profile we want, as long as we make them rigid. The more connections we create between the frames, the stronger our structure becomes. We can design the ship as a series of frames, and once the lines are satisfactory, we can start attaching "planks" to the frames, and we have a hull. The orientation of the frames means that we can do this with much less investment in slopes, and we don't need a SNOT interface part way up the hull to switch from "bottom" to "side". The diagonal orientation of the studs gives us a approximation of the hull of a ship (a V shape) which can be adapted for the appropriate part of the ship. The issue of tumblehome on a larger ship definitely needs to be addressed, but this could be done with any number of existing techniques, be it "free" hinged sections or slopes. There is most definitely a lower limit on how small you can make a frame (the hinges must go somewhere, and you must place them very carefully), which is why the bows of my prototype ship is simply SNOT. The larger your ship is, the less this will impact you. I hope this helps.
  25. cb4

    MOC: A busy shipyard

    Here are some detail shots of the hull. I've tiled in the bottom three rows on one side as a quick demonstration of the skinning technique.