cb4

Eurobricks Citizen
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Everything posted by cb4

  1. cb4

    HMS Reliant

    Keep in mind that the Leda class normally carried eight carronades in addition to its 38 long guns, which were not included in the rating but still occupied gun ports. I noticed that your model has 24 ports on the main deck. It seems like the Leda class had 28, so I don't think that your model is overgunned for a frigate by any means.
  2. cb4

    Flying Dutchman WIP

    Looks great, and not too wide at all. Most large lego ships are very thin due to the use of the prefab hull sections, so I think people are used to seeing them that way. If it were me I might make the curve of the bows a bit finer. Even if you're trying to stay close to the movie version, I think the lines are probably up to you. I've seen plans for the floating set but I believe that it is quite distorted as it was used for filming and not for the CG macro shots.
  3. cb4

    28 gun Frigate HMS Suprize

    Perhaps you might build a little jig/tripod out of lego to hold the camera for you so that all you need to do is trigger the shutter. I'd really like to see some pictures that do this MOC justice.
  4. cb4

    Flying Dutchman WIP

    Wow, I've looked at the flickr pictures and it seems legitimately all lego. I wonder if he created the model in LDD and then exported the data to Solidworks or something. It'd be interesting to see if someone could build that in real life. I've found that the cruelest foe for any model is gravity. LDD is a zero-gravity environment, so you can build things that would fall apart or distort or stabilize in an unintended way if they were physical models. The detail on the beakhead in particular looks very delicate. It's quite the combination of new and old parts.
  5. cb4

    Help with Indication!

    This is a pretty confusing subject, actually. Given the renegade runner's sail plan, which has a single mast well forward, it does appear to be a sloop, as opposed to a cutter, which has the mast more centrally located. However, a sloop is also defined as any non-rated ship (less than 20 carriage guns) captained by a Master and Commander in the Royal Navy. Such a ship might be a brig, or might be a ship (fully rigged with 3 masts). A single masted sloop seems to have been a fairly small ship, and probably wouldn't have had more than 4 or 6 guns at the most. It seems like most single-masted warships/privateers/pirates were cutters instead. You should decide whether or not you want your ship to have a single mast, and if you do, whether or not it should be a cutter or a sloop. I wouldn't worry overmuch in remaining totally faithful to the renegade runner.
  6. cb4

    A proposal

    Well, my ship is now near enough to completion it could probably be entered into the game.
  7. cb4

    WIP Barbary Corsair Xebec

    Yup, I've got to buy some thick thick string for the standing rigging. Shrouds and stays shouldn't be all thin like they are.
  8. cb4

    WIP Barbary Corsair Xebec

    Quick update, rigging mechanism only. My first attempt made me realize that I needed to reduce the transverse loads on the masts when raising the yards and find a way to make the halyards run more smoothly. I've switched the top-blocks from using technic pieces with holes to a sandwich of round 1x1 plates. This allows the halyards to pass through the top of the mast without catching on any sharp edges. It's not as good as if I had little wheels in there, but there just isn't enough space. I've also added technic plates partway down the masts to act as guides for the halyards, and used headlight bricks to make little blocks at the bottom to run the halyards through. This ensures that pulling on a halyard doesn't pull the mast sideways. Finally, I've changed the way the halyards attach to the yards so that there is a little block-and-tackle. This halves the amount of force needed to lift the yards and allows the halyards to be belayed just by wrapping them around the bottom a few times.
  9. cb4

    WIP Barbary Corsair Xebec

    Well, in the book Master and Commander the xebec-frigate Cacafuego was actually in the process of changing her rigging between xebec and polacre in one of the circumstances when the Sophie caught sight of her. This might simply be something that Patrick O'Bryan made up, but as he based the action on various historical accounts of HMS Speedy's capture of the El Gamo, I consider it to be at the very least plausible. It wasn't at all something that was critical to the plot, so it makes me think he simply put it in to inform the reader. The author did a great deal of research to make sure everything he put into his books was as realistic as possible (though he took a lot of liberties with history), so I don't think he'd put it in if it was something that was never practiced.
  10. cb4

    WIP Barbary Corsair Xebec

    Yup, I'm guessing that having yards longer than the keel is impractical for storage purposes (not to mention the problem of finding large enough trees!) I may end up doing the same thing, I'm not quite sure yet. I'm also wondering if I can set things up such that I can re-rig as a polacre on the fly, since that was a common practice with xebecs in order to gain downwind performance.
  11. cb4

    WIP Barbary Corsair Xebec

    Yes, a bedsheet is a great idea - I'll have to try that. The deck isn't by any means finished, I need to build the galley, the longboat, and the windlass at the very least, and figure out where the hatches will go. I've rigged it temporarily so I can get the proportions right, figure out where the stays and shrouds will go, and deal with any issues that come up. I've discovered that the yards aren't rigid enough (the mainyard is 90 studs long, so you can imagine how flexible it is), and that I don't have the anchors for the foremast shrouds in quite the right position.
  12. cb4

    WIP Barbary Corsair Xebec

    Beakhead, and preliminary attempt at rigging to get the shape right. The ship is outgrowing my ability to photograph it!
  13. cb4

    A proposal

    The draft of a full hull model is normally pretty well defined - I can tell you mine, but the problem is going to be with waterline models. I suppose that the draft could be estimated based on the type of ship and its other dimensions. Does your data for real ships give a reasonable looking curve if draft is plotted against beam and width, or is it a scatter?
  14. cb4

    Artillery Battery

    This is beautiful. I think that the ruined buildings are great. They look very realistic and I can easily imagine where the original building was. Two guns is plenty in a raised battery like this. I like that you didn't just pack in a huge number of guns. I like how anyone attacking the battery will be exposed while they come up the steps, but anyone retreating to it will be protected from fire from the outside. The only thing I might have done differently would be to make the embrasures for the guns a bit more filled in, right now they are a little bit exposed. However, it would also hide some of the detail. I think any attacking ship would be very wary of your red hot shot!
  15. cb4

    WIP Barbary Corsair Xebec

    Are those ball joints of some kind? I can't really see properly.
  16. cb4

    WIP Barbary Corsair Xebec

    Quarterdeck and poop, with decoration. I'm not sure what the grating on the poop is all about (weight savings??) but I'm going to try to reproduce it faithfully.
  17. cb4

    A proposal

    Objectively, I'd be pretty concerned about using my MOC's weight as a basis for a realistic structural weight. While it approximates realistic construction techniques, there are a lot of compromises. From the plans that I have, I believe that the planking thickness is quite close to being correct, if 1 plate ~= 5 inches. However, it does not have nearly as many frames/stringers and other structural members as a realistic wooden model might have. For the purposes of the model, it does not need them due to lego at this scale being much, much stronger than oak at full scale. The frames that are there are much too thick, particularly at the bottom, because they need to be sufficiently sturdy and I can't just curve lego pieces - I need to build a laminated curve. The keel structure is too large, because it needs to anchor the hinges that hold the frames at the correct angle. The deck structure is reasonably accurate, but the real ship had two decks, one a convex structural deck, and the other laid directly on top of it to provide a flat surface for the guns. I have omitted the underlying curved deck for the sake of simplicity. There's also the fact that my ship is a xebec, which is much more related to a galley than say, a carrack or caravel, and has developed through somewhat convergent evolution to start to look something like a frigate/sloop, but with lateen sails. I do know that Mediterranean ships were built much lighter than those intended for use in the open ocean and intended to engage their opponents with heavy guns at close range. All in all, I think that the ship's frame is probably about 60% as heavy as it should be, assuming that the existing frame is heavier, yet much sparser, than a real frame. I really have no idea what percentage of the ship is frame and what percentage is planking, not having kept a part count. I also need a much more accurate measurement of my ship's total mass, including crew, guns, masts and rigging, etc. It occurs to me that the masts are probably much too light, given that they are mostly hollow. I'm wondering, should we include stores/water/ballast stones? Should we remove the guns and crew when weighing? Clearly the guns are not as heavy as they should be, but they still weigh something.
  18. cb4

    WIP Barbary Corsair Xebec

    Another update, at long, long last. Finally she has as completed hull, all her guns, and a proper colour scheme.
  19. cb4

    (W.I.P.) HMHV Snake Redux

    I think you're doing a great job with a limited parts selection. When I look at the long shot of the model I immediately think small sloop, and all the proportions seem just right. I especially like the fact that she has a considerable beam. I shudder when I think about the metacentric height of the first ship I built. I never put any foremast backstays on my little schooner, only shrouds. I just ran a stay from the top of the foremast to the top of the mainmast, and then set up a pair of running backstays for the mainmast that I could adjust by wrapping them around railing supports. I'm not sure if it's historically accurate or anything like that, but it meant that I could tighten up the whole rig just with the running backstays. I found that there wasn't much point in trying to get it really drum tight, but just to get the slackness out. In any event, it seems like you need one set of stays or the other to be adjustable without retying knots, otherwise it's like herding cats.
  20. cb4

    Red-Coat Shipyard

    If I were you I wouldn't bother with the cheese slopes, but instead just make the curves more gradual by changing the level one plate at a time. For the keel you could consider laminating it, so that it has a layer of white tiles, a layer of white plates, and then brown or beige. I've found that you can make very gradual and convincing looking curves without using any slopes, which gives you a lot more flexibility and is a lot more economical, too! This looks really cool and I'm eager to see more!
  21. cb4

    A proposal

    Yes, all the evidence I've seen is that 9 pdrs aren't all that much lighter than 18 pdrs or any other long gun. Really my ship should be armed with carronades, as they were in reality very light compared to cannon. I'd like to see 4 pdrs and 6 pdrs in the game as they were the common weapons for small sloops, and most MOCs are of about that size (although most are armed with what we consider 24 pdrs!) My ship is definitely mini-fig illusion scale, and so it is a bit too small for minifigs. I do think that your scaling factor for lengths is off, however - since minifigs come out extremely short at 4 feet 8 inches or thereabouts (assuming minifigs are intended as reference humans). The truth is that it would be impossible to overarm real ships in the way that we do since it takes many men and a lot of room to serve a gun in anything like safety. Many MOCs don't have any room for recoil or anything near the crew needed to reload their weapons in good time. Right now I don't think there's any way of controlling crew size and there's no metric for serviceability of guns so a hogging factor or something like it is probably the best option. In theory I agree with you, but the formula really favours heavy ships. If I enter my ship as 800 g, she makes 10.3 knots. At 10000 g, she makes 8.8 knots (both cases with no armament). The actual in-game movement numbers come out identically, so there is absolutely no point in making a ship light. Much better to fill the hold with the heaviest stuff you can find. My ship is light because I'm trying to use a historically accurate building technique as far as I can approximate it with lego, and I don't want to make my hull two plates thick and have a scantling every two studs, as it wouldn't gain me anything of value except massive part consumption. I do not think that my ship is exceptionally light by the standards of my own technique, but perhaps it is exceptionally light by other standards. I do not have a traditional lego ship to compare it with. I really think that hitpoints should be based primarily on the size of a hull (but this would probably need more than a beam/length measurement). A true minifig scale ship would be much larger and would have a much larger hull. The only way you're going to get a formula that is consistent with historical numbers is by measuring in the same way that ships were measured historically. My understanding is that they would make a series of measurements to determine the submerged volume of the hull, and then use that to determine the ship's total mass. This is impractical for most MOCs as most are not waterline models. May I ask how the scaling factor for MOC weight to scaled tons was derived? Is it arbitrary based on fitting a particular example MOC to the formula or is it based on the scaled down weight of a ship with the difference in density between ABS plastic and Oak or some other wood factored in?
  22. cb4

    A proposal

    Well, by decks I mean number of gun decks. Currently there's no notion of rigging damage vs hull damage. If all non-special event type damage is to the hull, there's no point in looking at the ship's rig for hitpoints. I believe that we should calculate a theoretical tonnage for a ship based on its dimensions and then use that to derive speed/hitpoints/etc. Using physical MOC weight is really simple. Unfortunately, I don't think it's comparable between MOCs unless they're built using very similar techniques, and so using it will give one technique or another an arbitrary advantage. It gives you a very quick answer, and if you don't mind getting weird outputs where a ship that's one and a half times as big as another has half as many hitpoints, then I guess that's ok - but I think it will discourage people from playing if their ship doesn't fit the mold, so to speak.
  23. cb4

    A proposal

    You're absolutely right, afterwards I thought to myself that I should have thrown a barrel or something into the water, but I wasn't thinking. If I do it again I'll make the water level much higher so I can hold the camera more steadily and do something like that so it's easier to see where the surface actually is. Yes, the square-cube law is really going to eat our lunch for any potential floating MOCs. I think after I've finished the ship I'll do the experiment again to see just where it ends up. At least we don't have to worry about Reynolds numbers! I'm in favour of basing hitpoints and other attributes on ship dimensions and things like the number of masts, decks, etc because weights are going to vary wildly between MOCs. Perhaps this would be useful for that sort of thing: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Builder%27s_Old_Measurement
  24. cb4

    A proposal

    Well, you've all inspired me to do a bizarre experiment. With the help of some cling-wrap, I made my WIP watertight, and she does, in fact, float. It seems like she draws about 5 studs of water. Apologies for the bad pictures, but bathtub shots are difficult and perilous. I think she's slightly by the stern but the trim is actually quite good. I really get a sense now of just how low in the water xebecs really were. The ship is only going to get heavier and really I don't think I'd want her to be heavier than this if I wanted her to float properly with a full load. The exercise is ridiculous in every sense, but I think it illustrates my point. You wouldn't expect most MOCs to float, and by the same logic it doesn't make sense to make them adhere to a narrow weight range in order to participate in a game. MOCs are about looks, so I think that it makes much more sense to base attributes on physical dimensions, not mass.
  25. cb4

    A proposal

    This is my point exactly - some MOCs would sink like stones, and some might actually float (if they were watertight). We don't in general build MOCs with the intention that they should float, so nobody cares how much they weigh - but somehow we do for this game? I do know what you mean, but length and beam are intentional. Nobody - to my knowledge - builds MOCs with a target weight in mind. Well, I don't have scientific scales. I think there is a bathroom scale somewhere, but the uncertainty on a bathroom scale is about 30% the weight of my MOC. There's every reason to make up a number instead.