DragonKhan

Eurobricks Vassals
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About DragonKhan

  • Birthday 03/15/1984

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  1. DragonKhan

    Fairground Sets - Rumours and Discussion

    The rumoured ride from the background is not a freefall tower though, but a "star flyer". They are basically chair swing rides on a tower. You don't drop, you slowly ride up and down while spinning. They're only thrillrides if you're afraid of heights. :) THIS! In my opinion, a freefall tower is the most plain and boring looking fun-fair ride there could possibly be. A classic chair swings ride or pirate boat ride I'd love to see MUCH more! :) So I hope the rumours are false and are just coming from the assumption of the ride in the backgrounds is a freefall tower.
  2. DragonKhan

    10261 LEGO Creator Expert Roller Coaster

    Impressive! I was wondering how long it would take until someone would try exactly that. It's more than just ugly though! And it's quite costly too. Because if I see it correctly, the loop requires the "valley piece" 8 times. The "hill piece" counterpart is rather unusable for such unorthodox builds since you can't connect it to anything else but the 45° slope I suppose?
  3. DragonKhan

    10261 LEGO Creator Expert Roller Coaster

    You really can't compare a marble run (as awesome as it is) to a roller coaster (which has carts with wheels). There's several major differences which are important. I tried to explain some of them previously, but I suppose I have failed there ... Of course it'd be theoretically possible to create new tracks and (more importantly) suitable trains, but what's the point of the current system then? I'd consider a new system highly unlikely, especially with third party systems with flexible tracks already on the market. Lego obviously goes for the playability of the coaster. A loop doesn't fit that in any case, otherwise it would've already happened ... You seem to understand it. I'm also expecting some MOC creations with some out-of-the-box thinking to make some inversion possible. But there will be some rather unorthodox techniques that need to be used which you'll never see in an official set.
  4. DragonKhan

    10261 LEGO Creator Expert Roller Coaster

    I've already explained why that won't happen. Especially not the small size that'd be needed to combine it with the system. It'd be way to tight and the twisting track at the entry and exit (the track does not go straight, but has to offset itself slightly to the side) would cause the train Lego is using to jam. It might be possible if the loop is large enough (less harsh twisting track where the train could get stuck), but then the first drop (and the whole ride) would be beyond huge. People need to get their loops out of their heads.
  5. DragonKhan

    10261 LEGO Creator Expert Roller Coaster

    I honestly see plenty of possible alternative track layouts.
  6. DragonKhan

    10261 LEGO Creator Expert Roller Coaster

    Almost. It's not so much the amount of g-forces, but the rate the g-force changes. Circular loops are possible (and do exist), as long as the radius doesn't change to suddenly. Doesn't matter for Lego figures though, they can take the forces. Good luck with the loop. I'm wondering myself if the offset and the entry and exit of the loop can be little enough that the twisting track can be managed by the cars. Possibly, but there's probably a lot of tweaking needed.
  7. DragonKhan

    10261 LEGO Creator Expert Roller Coaster

    I've heard oh so many people saying how they have patience and are good with models, just to hear them later yelling at the model how crappy it apparently is. So I'm always hesitant about suggesting these models to even experienced model builders. Coasterdynamix has brought out many great models (the company was founded by coaster enthusiasts after all). However they were not really successful since most people just couldn't get them to work right. It's the very reason model coasters are rare. It's almost like the holy grail of scale models. Especially their H0 scale wooden coaster was insane to get to work because of the small scale. I've uploaded a video of mine some years ago and I couldn't believe the hundreds(!) of people that asked me about tips and if I could construct theirs. The K'Nex coasters are not a very good reference. They are rather simple in comparison. Not surprisingly since they are also considered a toy. Why am I saying all this? Well, as a warning about the frustration I guess. Even if you're certain of your ability you will come across plenty of frustration and countless hours of stupid little things you'll try to get to work. The CDX blocks coaster is a bit easier to work with than the previous "roller coaster factory" and it's definitely a set I'd recommend for the curious, but it's still far from easy. One should definitely not try too hard or else you're really setting yourself up for frustration. Loops and crazy twists look awesome, but you're better off with just building a simple figure-8 first.
  8. DragonKhan

    10261 LEGO Creator Expert Roller Coaster

    Doubt it they'll push the limits. That's really what the CDX kit is for. And I agree with you about Lego keeping it simple. I also love that because I know when Lego brings something out, it'll work right away! 100% my thinking! I won't be able to afford more than one set, but knowing how much some AFOLs will dive into this gets me really excited. There were already many great coaster creations with CDX and other custom systems. With an official system now this is going to be crazy cool!
  9. DragonKhan

    10261 LEGO Creator Expert Roller Coaster

    It won't happen. It just won't. Because of what I've said already ... It especially won't happen with the current trains. I think many people here are thinking of a roller coaster model way to simple. Anyone who has worked with any kind of coaster model knows how problematic it can be. Lego has already acknowledged the CDX product and how it's not something they will produce. CDX is for those who are willing to put much more effort in constructing an excessive coaster. The Lego coaster is for those who just want to build a coaster and have fun.
  10. DragonKhan

    10261 LEGO Creator Expert Roller Coaster

    Obviously I don't know for sure, but I'd answer both of those questions with "probably". By the way ... Am I the only one that is excited about the support structure seemingly being very flexible? It might not be the prettiest, but with all those connectors I can't shake off the feeling that Lego made them purposely very flexible so other track layouts are easy to build.
  11. DragonKhan

    10261 LEGO Creator Expert Roller Coaster

    Yup, to a large part this is true. Also most modern roller coasters have articulated cars like that. I've also mentioned that earlier: There's an important detail though. When using one axis per cart, the first two axes can't be allowed to move vertically or horizontally relative to each other. They can only allowed to "twist". This ensure a stable front car ("zero-car" in coaster speak) that delivers the required stability to the freely attached carts that follow. This principle is also used in the CDX coaster. Anyone who has a set probably knows what I'm talking about. If you skip that important leading car the whole train will jam. You can also observe that in videos of CDX coasters (or any model or real coaster with articulated trains) if you watch how differently the first two carts move relative to each other compared to the other carts. Now to the question why Lego isn't doing that. Well, have you had the chance to play around with some coaster model set with flexible track? Let's put it that way, it's not exactly an activity for the impatient. While it would offer many more possibilities, it would not really be suitable as a toy for kids or impatient adults. It requires quite a bit of skill and a ton of patience (but then, the reward is amazing). I'm quite certain that the reason Lego isn't bringing out flexible track, banked turns/inversions (and with all that, the previously explained articulated trains) is not the lack of will, but simply to keep it simple enough that their customers can just construct the set and then have fun playing with it right away instead of fiddling around for hours to make it work.
  12. DragonKhan

    10261 LEGO Creator Expert Roller Coaster

    No hard feelings, but I think the version of FLP is actually more accurate. The steep slope clearly works better. (you can't compare the ratings in RCT though, since different styles of coasters get rated differently, even with the exactly same layout) You, Sir, just gave me a tremendous idea! It will be done!
  13. DragonKhan

    10261 LEGO Creator Expert Roller Coaster

    Flexible track would create many more possibilities, but it would be a nightmare to make work nicely, especially in the hands of kids. It would just cause a tremendous amount of frustration. It was quite clear to me that if Lego would come out with a roller coaster, the track will be rigid. It makes the system "playable". The reason they have the studs right side up all the time is geometry an simplicity. And if you look at one of the alternative builds from the pirate coaster you can see that you actually can use the tracks "off-slope". So it seems Lego was thinking along and you can use straight track pieces for the lift with some smart SNOT building. Pretty awesome if you'd ask me. I'm not seeing how two curves could create a vertical drop though. You do realize that the carts "wrap around" the track to ensure it won't derail?
  14. DragonKhan

    10261 LEGO Creator Expert Roller Coaster

    I can tell. And I can tell you loved playing Roller Coaster Tycoon. But I'm sorry to burst your bubble. As I explained (and Fuppylodders explained well again), it's simply not possible. I wish it would be ... There's a reason roller coaster models are rather rare. They are quite the nightmare to get to work right. I've had my fair share of experience. When it comes to different train types, I'm hoping that the AFOL community will come up with some creative ideas. Spinning and wing coasters should be possible. Inverted coasters like Nemesis less so (no wheels on the underside of the cart as far as I know?). Oh and another thing I forgot ... If you actually use modern wheel assemblies, the consistent width of the track actually would be an issue. The track has to narrow slightly in the turns then. Yup, roller coasters are quite the science!
  15. DragonKhan

    10261 LEGO Creator Expert Roller Coaster

    This is going quite into details, so be warned. :P In order to go into a banked turn, the track has to twist in 3 dimensions instead of 2 like on flat turns (horizontal turn) or drops/hill (vertical turn). A fixed axis can't manage such a "space curve" (technical term, google it) well without jaming. It also gets much worse when a cart hast two axes which can't twist relative to each other, which is the case here. A banked turn can still be somewhat managed if the bank is introduced before the track actually turns, but you need quite a bit of space for that to minimize the jamming since the axes can't twist relative to each other. And on a model coaster where the train has hardly any mass, even the slightest imperfection will make the train jam. This is also the reason we won't be seeing any kind of inversion in the new system from Lego. Pretty much all modern roller coasters have individual wheel assemblies instead (you can still find fixed axes on some very old wooden coaster). Those can "steer" with the track, making even the wildest maneuvers possible. On the scale of Lego that, of course, is not viable. To counter the problematic friction you'd want to keep the wheels as large as possible, but realistic wheel assemblies would be incredibly tiny. As far as I know the only somewhat realistic roller coaster model is the O-scale Inverted coaster from Coasterdynamix (where a single train has 42 wheels!). Stupid natural laws and their inability to be scaled for models! That all makes me think now ... A Lego coaster cart has two axes, right? Could removing an axis from the trailing carts (leading cart needs two axes) improve the friction and jamming problem somewhat? Basically making a modern articulated roller coaster train. Has anyone tried that already?