Recommended Posts

F-4 Phantom – 5195 units produced, 63 years of production/service, dozens of monographs, modelling plans, etc., what can go wrong? Well, actually quite many things. Still, after a few setbacks, here it is, my latest model

About the jet

The history of McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II started back in the mid 50’, with the first flight taking place on 27th May 1958. Initially, the F4H-1 (the initial designation before the tri-service unification) started as an unsolicited proposal from McDonnell Douglas, which actually didn’t get much interest. Only after the problems of other Navy fighters led to the necessity of acquiring a new general-purpose fighter, the Phantom as we know could get its chance. After winning the competition against the Vought’s F8U-3 Crusader III submission, the F4H-1 went to service in 1961, with a new designation of F-4B (starting in 1962). Even though F-4B was a revolutionary design for it time, it still had a number of deficiencies, with the most serious ones being slightly too high approach speed, and its AN-APQ-72 radar lacking the look-down, shoot-down capabilities, performing poorly against the ground clutter. As a consequence, after delivering 649 F-4B, in late 1966 McDonnell introduced a new, improved version – the F-4J. This version featured a revised and strengthened internal structure, more powerful J79-GE-10 engines (the smokeless, 10B version was introduced later in 1978), new, wider tires (resulting in bulges on the top part of the wings), a few aerodynamic improvements for decreasing the approach speed (changes to inboard leading edges and slotted stabilator), and most importantly, new AWG-10 radar, with solid-state elements and prominent look-down, shoot-down capabilities. The F-4J served through the Vietnam war until the late 70’, together with the F-4B, and later F-4N (upgraded F-4B). After that, starting from 1978, the selected 265 F-4J underwent an upgrade to F-4S standard (the initial idea was for 302, but the number was reduced), featuring smokeless J79-GE-10B engines, improved electronics, and leading-edge maneuvering slats, similar to those on USAF’s F-4E. In this variant, Phantoms served until 1987 in USN, and 1992 in USMC. In the meantime, 15 F-4J were also sold to UK, to fill the gap left by FGR. 2 Phantoms (F-4M) deployed to the Falkland Islands. These aircraft, known also as F-4J(UK) Phantom F.3s, served from 1984 to 1991. Interestingly, they were greatly appreciated by the RAF pilots, with most of them considering them superior to British Spey-engined variants, mainly due to the much faster response of the J-79 turbojets, in comparison to Rolls-Royce Spey 203 turbofans.  

About the building process

While I’ve always appreciated the F-4, I was never a “Phantom Phanatic”. In fact, the idea for this model came to me by accident – I was a bit stuck with other projects, and thinking about different solutions, the idea that 2x3x1 curved slopes would make for an excellent Phantom fuselage went through my mind. I thought that these easy, boxy shapes of F-4 would make for a nice relax after the complex shapes of my F-14 and MiG-29, and so I started. Unfortunately, I made a huge mistake at the very beginning – I used the blueprints from the book, without validating their correctness first, which later cost me a lot of headaches.

Before going further, I should mention some of the F-4 models by other people, which were a huge inspiration to me. Of course, there is an excellent F-4B by Mad Physicist, a beautiful F-4B by Carl Greatrix, and a whole series of different F-4s by Justin Davies. However, from the viewpoint of my model, three Phantoms were of particular importance to me. The first one is F-4N by Jonah Padberg. Even though I’ve ended with a very different cockpit design, I’ve started with the modification of his 3-stud wide canopy and angled cockpit section. The next model is a F-4B by Maks, who made an excellent, SNOT version of the Phantom, which to a large degree influenced some of my design choices. Lastly, there is a huge, 1/15 scale F-4J by crash_cramer, which might be my favorite LEGO model ever. Similarly, as in the case of my F-14 Tomcat, I tried to emulate some of his techniques in a smaller scale.

The first assumption was to go for the 3-stud wide canopy, similar to my MiG-29. Such a solution is much more accurate in this scale and makes the model look much more realistic in my opinion. In fact, I’m so pleased with the outcome here that I will likely rebuild my F-14 in near future to a similar standard. The construction itself started with the wings. I’ve always come under impression that similarly to F-15, the angle for the leading edge is 45 degrees. Well, not really. Instead, the angle is 51 degrees, which effectively eliminates any plate-based solutions, leaving the brick-built wing as the only valid option. So instead of getting a nice, simple, sturdy 45 degrees wing, I had to go with a brick-built one, which combined with the main landing gear solution and folding mechanism, proved to be a nightmare. After figuring it out, the next challenge was to design the angled cockpit area. Here, the solutions from Jonah’s model were of great help. With those two pieces in place, the rest went relatively smoothly, leading to the stage presented in WiP pictures. And then, having 85% of the model ready, I checked the validity of my blueprints. I was able to get my hands on the original F-4 factory drawing on the Aviation Archives website, and all my drawings turned out to be off by a considerable margin. Fortunately, I’m not the only person dissatisfied with the quality of available blueprints, and I was able to find this awesome website, with a set of 100% accurate drawings, based on the factory ones, including the cross-sections. That was good news, the bad one was that my fuselage was too short, too high, and too wide. So I had to lower the whole fuselage by a plate, elongate it by 2 studs, and modify it from 10-stud wide, to 9-stud wide. Surprisingly, it wasn’t that hard, but after lowering the fuselage, it became evident that the angling of the front section is too steep. This, in turn, required a complete revision of the already most problematic section, consuming an awful lot of time. But after all these problems, I finally got a model, with which I am quite satisfied.

About the model

The model represents a McDonnell Douglas F-4J Phantom II in a 1/33 scale. The camouflage is based on the F-4J from VF-96 squadron, BuNo. 155800, callsign “Showtime100”, deployed on the USS Constellation aircraft carrier in Vietnam, around 1972.  This particular aircraft, on the 10th of May 1972, was credited with 3 MiG-17 kills, being flown by pilot Lt Randy Cunningham and RIO Lt(jg) Willy Driscoll. This effectively made them the only Navy aces of the Vietnam war, as they already had 2 kills on their account. You may also note that they flew a “borrowed” plane, as the name on the cockpit is that of Lowell “Gus” Eggert, who later commanded the USS Constellation from 1974 onward. As usual, the model possesses a number of features: openable cockpits, working flaps, foldable wings, working horizontal and vertical tails, retractable landing gear and tailhook. I’m rather pleased with the functionality, as most of the features, especially the landing gear, are much more reliable than in e.g. my MiG-29. The loadout comprises 4 AIM-7E Sparrows, 4 AIM-9G Sidewinders, and a centerline 600 gal. fuel tank. Also, under the wings, there are outboard pylons for two 370 gal. fuel tanks, which are visible on some of the photos. The credit for the stand design goes to Jerac. There is a small discrepancy in the camouflage – in principle nearly all USN phantoms had an all-white underside, with an exception of some late 80s’, extremely dull, low-vis versions. Unfortunately, due to the brick-built nature of the wing, I was unable to make them white on the bottom. For a moment, I contemplated utilizing huge white stickers, but it wouldn’t look all that great, and it would make the wings extremely modification-unfriendly. Still, the final effect is not that bad. So, please enjoy, and let me know what is your opinion on this model.

Flickr gallery

 

52463094960_b85c84d41a_k.jpg

52463174673_03c3a6a873_k.jpg

52463174828_83dab27c33_k.jpg

52462124712_92e61cd12a_k.jpg

52463174648_8e72562c41_k.jpg

52462911414_3462a4ded2_k.jpg

52463174713_dae56d149f_k.jpg

Edited by Juliusz D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[url=https://flic.kr/p/2o38qh8][img=https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/52532621887_39a8d9ca40_n.jpg][/url][url=https://flic.kr/p/2o38qh8]house[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/195192011@N02/]Dong hyuck KIM[/url], Flickr에서

 

52532621887_39a8d9ca40_n.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Test Post:

Lego

 

  1. Lego

:cannon:

 

lego2.jpg.511d44981805b062ce05d8057ac181f0.jpg

 

Spoiler

The following may contain tests.

Quote

This is not really a quote, just a test.

LS75104SUPERSET

 

 

EDIT 1/7/2022 8:29 p.m.: Tested to see if EDIT function works

Edited by NilssonLegoEngineering
To test the edit function.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greetings! I can't believe I never joined this site before! I need to experiment with linking image files because my pics are too big for this site. I have mocs to enter into the CSE contest, but haven't yet figured out how to do it. I can post a link from Flickr, right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, I’m Alpha Bernini, just signed in, and right now I’m practicing posting.

Fett kursiv unterstrichen durchgestrichen

OK, trying to embed a picture:

51123141542_cb06f265aa.jpg

Edited by Alpha Bernini

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Alpha Bernini said:

Hi, I’m Alpha Bernini, just signed in, and right now I’m practicing posting.

Fett kursiv unterstrichen durchgestrichen

OK, trying to embed a picture:

OK, this seems to work :pir-wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

blablabla

Bild:

52488956426_f42d2ac1c9_z.jpg

gjhlkjh

einbetten 640

<a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/186393687@N04/52488956426/in/dateposted/" title="skull viper"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/52488956426_f42d2ac1c9_z.jpg" width="640" height="427" alt="skull viper"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Edited by Alpha Bernini

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.