Milan

Epic Journey: Building the LEGO room from scratch

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Note: this may start as a non-LEGO topic, but later on there will be all-LEGO related stuff.

Reading storage and sorting topic, i have noticed that many people said that they don't not have enough room in their houses/apartments to have LEGO room.

I have that issue, too, so i tried to make one myself in the basement, with some building materials I own, and with very low budget.

I have basic tools, and few helpful friends

So, I hope that this may help somebody, or at least provide some inspiration for a similar project ...

This topic will cover transformation from dusty, wooden-walls, earth-floor cellar...previously used as a bicycle and miscellaneous stuff....to fully equipped LEGO room, with a budget of a large LEGO set.

I live on a 3rd floor of the old building. My apartment is not very large, and my collection is growing each month, even just for a few bricks.

My usual method of storing boxes, drawers and bags are not working anymore. I needed bigger place for all that. Since dedicating one of the rooms from the apartment to LEGO is not an option, i decided to go down...to the basement.

The basement is divided, and each apartment has its own small area, divided by wooden bars. So security is high on list.

I am tight on budget, only about 200e, and I work and study, so I can only build this after work or on weekends. Luckily, I got few days off the job to start with.

Beginning and planing...

room.jpg

Simple 6 square meters (65 square feet) room, with large main work table on the left with lots of plastic and metal drawers where the main parts will be, on the back support table with a PC, on the right display shelf with additional storage boxes. At the front there should be strong metal doors with frame.

DAY ONE:

I haven't been in cellar for a few months, light broke, all kinds of boxes on the floor, wooden walls moved quite a bit, wooden door was in a sorry state...

1.jpg

Note the naked walls, not painted ceiling, wooden walls that are ripped out of their slots and slid in and out. Floor is still just naked earth dust.

DAY EIGHT:

2.jpg

First, light was fixed, and ALL of the stuff was trowed out.

Next, wooden walls are placed on their original slots, and secured top and bottom,

Next, thin layer of concrete floor was made.

Then, window frame is painted white, still without the glass, the ceiling is also painted white in one layer.

Thin layer of green fabric was secured to the boards.

Naked wall was painted yellow

Tired...

DAY NINE:

3.jpg

I removed (destroyed) my cellar door together with front wooden wall. The same day I have sold that wood, so I made some money back to my wallet.

Next, all the remaining time of the day i was making measurements for actual building the room, starting with the door steel frame.

My plan is to make a room inside the room.

I want to leave wooden walls intact and make brick walls between them, and to install proper heavy, metal door. Heating and additional electricity work are still to be done.

Next...building materials are arriving. And (FINALLY) starting to place bricks on the baseplate...

TO BE CONTINUED...

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Milan I wish you all the best in your conversion. :sweet:

I have worked in the building industry for the last five years but mainly in new builds.

My first tip would be if it is underground to try and stop any dampness in the room by using damp-prof paint (bitumen paint).

bartoline-bbp-copy.jpg

Edited by Alasdair Ryan

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Same! That room looks about the same size as my old dorm, 2 bed 2 desks and nothing else. Shared bathroom sucks BTW cuz you never know who left a sewer pickle behind and forgot to flush.

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Good idea and I wish to make perfect room for yourself.

As this is the basement I believe there are water and heating pipes located in the same area? Make sure to keep your LEGO and electric stuff as much as possible off the ground. You don't what to find your PC broken and all LEGO damp in case of accident. Also make sure to think of protection from dust, dampness and "basement smell", as plastic parts tend to accumulate not just smoke. Good light sources is a must too.

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Thanks guys!

Zux and Alasdair, it is the underground, but so far it is dry. There are water and heating pipes everywhere...but the room is planned to be on clear space, only two new metal heating pipes are going to pass through. All electrical wires are going to be installed from the ceiling (there is just one cable)

There will be more dust removing that is sure, because only window is cca 30cm above the street.

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Well that is good to know,If I was doing this I would also put in insulation between the walls you make and the original walls of the building.

I would also think about hiding that black electrical cable behind a wooden wall covered in plasterboard.

masonrywallswithplasterboard.jpg

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I think that was separates the Lego boys from the Lego men is a dedicated Lego room. I mean, someone has to be really an aficionado of Lego to dedicate a room only for their Lego activities/hobby. I am a "boy" then and will never be a "man" since I can't see myself doing this even if my wife would allow (which she would never as well). Anyway, good luck with your project, looks challenging (the transformation of the room from unfinished to finished and beyond).

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DAY 11:

Materials are here:

Blue canvas on the right is waiting for the sand in a few minutes.

4.jpg

DAY 12:

Building started!

7.jpg

Heavy metal door installed. They are my favorite part of the room.

8.jpg

First layer of bricks is placed. My friend expert is helping here. There where he is standing, the main table will be placed.

Placing the bricks are not going fast, since we decided that all the work should be done without mechanized equipment. This will be cheaper.

Right now the bricks wall(s) is about half done.

When it is done, I need to clean the bricks and to treat the mortar. I will keep the brick wall...bricked, without paint or anything, just cleaned. I like bricks too much!

TO BE CONTINUED...

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It is nice to see that in Serbia you guys still build houses with real brick and cement, just like in Brazil. Here in the US, Americans use "drywall", a wall/roof made of paper, some dust and glue. Very good for the construction industry, very bad for homeowners...

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Vee, to be honest, I was considering "drywall", but ultimately three factors were prevailing: security, look and price. We have pretty low crime rate here, but since all of my LEGO parts and PC with copies of data important to me will be there, drywall was simple not an option. Drywall for this room size would cost 350-500 euros...all the materials for brick building cost me 140 euros. I am putting a lots of man hours in it, but better that than paying more...I have a tight budget.

Look is a matter of taste, but I think visible bricks would look cool for a mancave like this.

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Ok, so you do have drywall in your country. We don't have it in Brazil. I hate drywall, can't get used to it. I miss so much the brick walls in my apartment in Brazil. But the way they build houses here, it has probably to be drywall because of weight problems, I guess (and cost, and time, and labor...).

Interesting that drywall is more expensive than brick. Probably because you are not accounting for the cost of labor, since you are doing it yourself?

I also love the look of bricks. In our apartment, in Brazil, I had my office with one of the walls with a wallpaper that simulated bricks. So nice! A stupid painter painted on top of it, after we left, despite me telling him NOT to!

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Interesting that drywall is more expensive than brick. Probably because you are not accounting for the cost of labor, since you are doing it yourself?

Yes, that is true, since no one is selling drywall materials here without installation included in price.

Works for me: low cost of the bricks, I can do all the work, and save money, plus I learned a lot this way.

Looking good. Do you have security bars on the window?

Yes, I have bricks-built bars in mosaic shape on the wall opening where the window is. Looks nice and unusual. Thanks for your interest.

Right now we are about to finish laying bricks. My expert friend's assistance is done, I can work by myself from now on. Only some few hours of mortar mixing and putting it where needed.

Than a long work of bricks and mortar polishing and protecting. I have some custom recipe for that which I want to try.

Will post later some pics of the bricked room. Right now i think we are on the half way to finish the whole project. :)

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I am really enjoying watching the progress of this. I am lucky that my LEGO room is inside the house :)

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Day 13:

Dream team at peak efficiency :)

img_20140119_131346_resize.jpg

And after many many hand mixed buckets of mortar...

img_20140121_212929_resize.jpg

My bricked room is finished, at least regarding brick-works.

Now the funny part comes:few days of polishing and cleaning bricks with steal-wire-foam things, and filling the gaps with foam.

img_20140121_213043_resize.jpg

Every brick needs to get its treatment and to be glazed with home made liquid.

Tomorrow I am taking final measurements for my new tables. I will use my own wood boards, so I will cut expenses there, too.

Basically, I am selling everything of the materials which is not used.

Still to do in a next three days:

1. fill the gap above the metal door with wood board.

2. fill the gaps around the room with foam

3. get 20m long extension electric cable and get it to the lego room from my apartment on 3rd floor.

4. Scrape excess mortar of the bricks and polish them, and use eye and nose protection.

5. get some good night sleep!

Thanks all for the interest!

TO BE CONTINUED...

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Looking good so far. A lot of work but at the end you can enjoy in your piece of paradise. And, yes, brick looks good, I have it in my house as a bar.

I'll keep my fingers crossed that everything will be OK.

Great job!

P.S.

Pozdrav iz Hrvatske. :sweet:

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Really enjoyed following this Milan! Im struggling to find a place for all my bricks so this is very inspiring!

Looking forward to more updates!

CF

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